What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
Jack Douglas
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Jack Douglas » Thu Jun 22, 2017 3:15 pm

leslietranter wrote:
Thu Jun 22, 2017 1:41 pm
Jack Douglas wrote:
Sun Jul 10, 2016 11:35 am
Mouth gyrations and eye fluttering while playing
Sorry to hear that. I found that it is an affliction which has come on me while playing with increasing age and I am not conscious of it.
I'm increasing in age too. In my case I have to be careful not to drool :lol:
Hauser III 2014!

Lawler
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Lawler » Thu Jun 22, 2017 4:32 pm

Guitar orchestras have been mentioned... Tuomas Kourula, a member here, has done a lot of guitar orchestra conducting. I thought this performance was charming.


Youtube

martin_z
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by martin_z » Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:06 pm

One advantage of a guitar orchestra is that, because of the frets, they are at least in tune, no matter how badly they are played.

The cringiest sound in the world is an amateur string orchestra - a bunch of not very competent violin/viola/cello players who are almost, but not quite, in tune.

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Guitar-ded
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Guitar-ded » Fri Jun 23, 2017 12:18 am

Lawler wrote:
Thu Jun 22, 2017 4:32 pm
Guitar orchestras have been mentioned... Tuomas Kourula, a member here, has done a lot of guitar orchestra conducting. I thought this performance was charming.
To clarify the odd point.
Guitar orchestras can be good I'm sure, given work. Those I'm nominating here are the type where the members, often numbering in the dozens, have only been together for a matter of hours and many of those members may be new-ish to the guitar. The tuning is not always as it might be and the time keeping is often lax due in part to the nervousness of the players. I'm not saying it's a bad thing in and of itself, just that if it's not up to a decent standard please don't include it in the concert programme 'cause it's y'know... painful to watch and certainly a candidate for 'most cringiest'.
:bye:
Getting better bit by bit, day by day.

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Guitar-ded
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Guitar-ded » Fri Jun 23, 2017 12:20 am

Laudiesdad69 wrote:
Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:39 am
String shaming...but this only happens when they find out you strung your guitar up with D'Addario.
Exactly!
Don't these people realise that if you haven't included strings from at least four different makers on your instrument then ...well, you're simply not trying.
:roll:
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tothebroccolifields
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by tothebroccolifields » Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:01 am

Andrew Barrett wrote:
Sun Jul 10, 2016 12:26 pm
Adrian Allan wrote:Knowing the exact size and angle of Julian Bream's fingernails....

But not knowing the first thing about sonata form, or being able to name a famous classical sonata

ie. the short-sighted geekiness of "guitar culture".
This! I might supplement this by adding that I have met people obsessed with gear to an absurd extent. At some point shouldn't we all step back and make sure that our focus is on playing the guitar, not browsing the web discussing playing angle, ordering a new accessory that will "change the way you play" every other week, etc. I don't mind these things, but these elements of playing the guitar should not be the end-all-be-all of what it means to be a classical guitarist.
I definitely had the gear obsession for a while. For me it was guitar supports, I had about 6 of them in the span of two years. It' important to find something that works, but it's really easy to keep moving on to the next thing.

tothebroccolifields
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by tothebroccolifields » Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:05 am

Elitism.

chiral3
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by chiral3 » Fri Jun 30, 2017 12:56 pm

Re guitar orchestras - important not to change strings for the big show. I've seen it a few times; performers will change their string within days of the performance and you end up with all these guitars going slightly out of tune and it all just goes down hill. For anyone seeing a large guitar ensemble for the first time, it'll probably be their last.
物の哀れ

ddray
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by ddray » Fri Jun 30, 2017 1:43 pm

tothebroccolifields wrote:
Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:05 am
Elitism.
Yep, I agree.

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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:57 pm

ddray wrote:
Fri Jun 30, 2017 1:43 pm
tothebroccolifields wrote:
Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:05 am
Elitism.
Yep, I agree.
How about; it's opposite?
Simon Ambridge Series 40 (2005)
Trevor Semple Series 88 (1992)
Louis Panormo (1838)
Alexander Batov Baroque Guitar (2013)

ddray
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by ddray » Fri Jun 30, 2017 5:40 pm

Stephen Kenyon wrote:
Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:57 pm
ddray wrote:
Fri Jun 30, 2017 1:43 pm
tothebroccolifields wrote:
Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:05 am
Elitism.
Yep, I agree.
How about; it's opposite?
Populism? Egalitarianism? I can't speak for the original commenter, but I think the problem is not so much among those who are truly "elite".

Btw I'm not going to slam guitar orchestras either. These seem to be made up mostly of relatively inexperienced musicians, and why kill their enthusiasm with a jaded (dare I say) elitism? ;)

RainyDayMan
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by RainyDayMan » Tue Sep 12, 2017 2:30 am

Guitar-ded wrote:
Fri Jun 23, 2017 12:18 am
Lawler wrote:
Thu Jun 22, 2017 4:32 pm
Guitar orchestras have been mentioned... Tuomas Kourula, a member here, has done a lot of guitar orchestra conducting. I thought this performance was charming.
To clarify the odd point.
Guitar orchestras can be good I'm sure, given work. Those I'm nominating here are the type where the members, often numbering in the dozens, have only been together for a matter of hours and many of those members may be new-ish to the guitar. The tuning is not always as it might be and the time keeping is often lax due in part to the nervousness of the players. I'm not saying it's a bad thing in and of itself, just that if it's not up to a decent standard please don't include it in the concert programme 'cause it's y'know... painful to watch and certainly a candidate for 'most cringiest'.
:bye:
Tuning is an issue even with solo players. Sometimes an otherwise articulate performance just does not sit well because of the instruments is not tuned with greater precision, for the key, chords, positions used. Having said that, it probably better to play with others sometimes to improve general musicianship. Listening, timing, coordination etc.

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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Tue Sep 12, 2017 9:27 am

RainyDayMan wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 2:30 am
...

Tuning is an issue even with solo players. Sometimes an otherwise articulate performance just does not sit well because of the instruments is not tuned with greater precision, for the key, chords, positions used. Having said that, it probably better to play with others sometimes to improve general musicianship. Listening, timing, coordination etc.
Very true. And/but and apologies if I've said this already several times, take the exact same level of musical and instrumental competence as any given guitar orchestra, and distribute it randomly among the members of a conventional, amateur orchestra; you will prefer the guitar orchestra every time!
Simon Ambridge Series 40 (2005)
Trevor Semple Series 88 (1992)
Louis Panormo (1838)
Alexander Batov Baroque Guitar (2013)

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Adrian Allan
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Adrian Allan » Tue Sep 12, 2017 6:11 pm

Stephen Kenyon wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 9:27 am
RainyDayMan wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 2:30 am
...

Tuning is an issue even with solo players. Sometimes an otherwise articulate performance just does not sit well because of the instruments is not tuned with greater precision, for the key, chords, positions used. Having said that, it probably better to play with others sometimes to improve general musicianship. Listening, timing, coordination etc.
Very true. And/but and apologies if I've said this already several times, take the exact same level of musical and instrumental competence as any given guitar orchestra, and distribute it randomly among the members of a conventional, amateur orchestra; you will prefer the guitar orchestra every time!
That's the great thing about the guitar and teaching the guitar.

I really do pity violin teachers, but they must somehow musically switch off.
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Gwynedd
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Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Gwynedd » Wed Sep 13, 2017 11:26 am

Mouth gyrations and eye fluttering while playing
I muttered something about "guitar face" during one discussion of classical guitar at our group. Got a lot of response on that.

I think I saw a video masterclass with Sharon Isbin once, and in an offhand remark, she was telling the student that she could help with the face. I'm sure I heard this--it was in passing but at the time, I had no idea what she meant. Now, I know. She tosses her head back and closes her eyes. When I watch her, now I think, that would prevent a lot of the grimacing and scrunched mouth, screwed-up eyes we suffer from.

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