What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
User avatar
bear
Posts: 3509
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 10:55 pm
Location: Massachusetts

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by bear » Thu Jul 14, 2016 11:41 am

Lovemyguitar wrote:I find life so much easier being a reclusive loner and avoiding direct contact with other human beings. Thus, their "cringy" foibles never cross my path nor cause me vexation. :D
The reason I live in the woods. Aside from my wife and breakfast with my daughter on Sundays, I seldom see or speak to any humans. The more time I spend around people; the more I like horses.
2013 Jeff Medlin '37 Hauser 640mm sp
2006 Michele Della Guistina Concert 10 string 650mm ce
2005 Jose Ramirez 4E 650mm ce
2005 Manuel Rodriguez Model C3F 650mm sp
2003 Manuel Rodriguez Model D 650mm ce

User avatar
Andrew Fryer
Posts: 2293
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 9:13 pm
Location: London SE5

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Andrew Fryer » Thu Jul 14, 2016 12:41 pm

The most cringeworthy thing is when the cloth-eared and talentless tell the rest of us how great mediocrity is.
1975 Calatayud y Gisbert, Yamaha CG131S.

User avatar
bear
Posts: 3509
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 10:55 pm
Location: Massachusetts

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by bear » Thu Jul 14, 2016 1:53 pm

Andrew Fryer wrote:The most cringeworthy thing is when the cloth-eared and talentless tell the rest of us how great mediocrity is.
I think it's kind of like liver. I hate it but some folks will go on and on about how good they think it is.
2013 Jeff Medlin '37 Hauser 640mm sp
2006 Michele Della Guistina Concert 10 string 650mm ce
2005 Jose Ramirez 4E 650mm ce
2005 Manuel Rodriguez Model C3F 650mm sp
2003 Manuel Rodriguez Model D 650mm ce

User avatar
MattPM
Posts: 52
Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2015 11:11 pm
Location: Scotland, UK

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by MattPM » Thu Jul 14, 2016 10:51 pm

Definitely overacting expression

User avatar
Guitar-ded
Posts: 1782
Joined: Fri Jul 10, 2009 5:32 pm
Location: BC Canada

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Guitar-ded » Thu Jul 14, 2016 11:39 pm

Lovemyguitar wrote:
Jeffrey Armbruster wrote:I'd give Lovemyguitar a fist bump in solidarity, but I don't like that much contact.
:lol:

I'm with these guys.
:D

I think Joe and David have it about right too.
Getting better bit by bit, day by day.

Nick Clow
Posts: 278
Joined: Thu Nov 13, 2014 2:58 am
Location: Murwillumbah, Australia

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Nick Clow » Fri Jul 15, 2016 12:13 am

Here's the thing. In my direct experience, amateur CG players almost invariably try to play pieces well beyond their grade level. Someone who might be able to give a very passable rendition of "Lagrima", instead tries "Capricho Arabe". Someone who could play Ponce's "Tres Canciones" reasonably well instead chooses (with their teacher's full connivance!) to inflict "Theme Varie et Final" on the audience. And so forth.

I leaned MY lesson years ago, and I simply don't try to play anything past about Grade V levels. My own Damascus Moment came from reading a 1939 interview in "The New Yorker" with the famed German pianist Wilhelm Bachaus. He said "Why seek difficulty when there is so much that is quite as beautiful and yet not difficult? Why try to make a bouquet of oak trees, when the ground is covered with exquisite wildflowers?" And Bachaus possessed a true virtuoso technique, so that things like the Beethoven piano sonatas, Liszt's "Don Juan" Fantasy, the Brahms-Paganini variations, and so forth were his standard concert fare. And there is no doubting whatsoever that the CG repertoire is overflowing with such "exquisite wildflowers" ready to be plucked (in BOTH senses of the verb!)
These are wise words here and I am on the same page with my playing and aspirations. Rather than torture myself for weeks trying to play a grade 7 or 8 piece (that I end up not being able to play with a high degree of security), it's far preferable to learn a grade 5 or 6 piece. They are usually close to being sight-readable and come together quickly, meaning the process is fun. Once learned, I can play them securely.

I am always on the look out for 'wildflowers' up to grade 5 or 6. Obviously there's stuff like various Sor studies, the Brouwer studies, Pavlovits, Yvonne Bloor, various Carcassi and Carulli studies, Peter Nuttall, various Tarrega pieces and Sagreras..

Feel free to point me to any other stand outs in this grade range, good tips appreciated.
formerly Edward Frillypants

User avatar
David_Norton
Posts: 3895
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2008 4:12 pm
Location: Salt Lake City, UT, USA

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by David_Norton » Fri Jul 15, 2016 3:19 am

Nick Clow wrote: Feel free to point me to any other stand outs in this grade range, good tips appreciated.
Check YouTube for music by:
Jean-Marie Raymond
Maria Linnemann
Roque Carbajo
Giorgio Signorile (a Delcamp member!)
Yves Carlin
Yvon Demillac
Mark Houghton
Andrew Shiels
Steve Marsh
Jurg Kindle
Per Olav Kindgren
Claude Gagnon
David Norton
Salt Lake City, UT

User avatar
sxedio
Posts: 1080
Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2007 10:18 pm
Location: UK / Cyprus

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by sxedio » Fri Jul 15, 2016 7:56 am

Peter Nuttall music. I'd rather hear Carulli method exercises any day.
(Gr) (En) (very little Fr)

Nick Clow
Posts: 278
Joined: Thu Nov 13, 2014 2:58 am
Location: Murwillumbah, Australia

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Nick Clow » Fri Jul 15, 2016 11:26 pm

. Nick Clow wrote:
Feel free to point me to any other stand outs in this grade range, good tips appreciated.


Check YouTube for music by:
Jean-Marie Raymond
Maria Linnemann
Roque Carbajo
Giorgio Signorile (a Delcamp member!)
Yves Carlin
Yvon Demillac
Mark Houghton
Andrew Shiels
Steve Marsh
Jurg Kindle
Per Olav Kindgren
Claude Gagnon
Thanks
formerly Edward Frillypants

User avatar
Muggins Simoon
Posts: 152
Joined: Tue Dec 03, 2013 4:27 pm
Location: Michigan, USA

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Muggins Simoon » Sat Jul 16, 2016 2:50 am

Recent entry: how every conservatory student has a Bam case. I wanted one till I saw everyone already owned one
2011 Mathieu Trepanier Sitka/Koa
2000 Otto Vowinkel Concert Spruce/Brazilian
1998 Christopher Dean Spruce/Indian
1995 Richard Schneider Sequoia/Brazilian
1979 Dauphin Model 40 (Japan-signed label) Cedar/Indian

sbsequeira
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2016 8:16 pm
Location: San Diego, CA

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by sbsequeira » Sun Jul 17, 2016 9:17 am

Adrian Allan wrote:Knowing the exact size and angle of Julian Bream's fingernails....

But not knowing the first thing about sonata form, or being able to name a famous classical sonata
Absolutely! My "cringiest" thing about guitar culture is power chords and four chord pop songs.

User avatar
60moo
Posts: 1790
Joined: Fri Nov 28, 2008 11:35 am
Location: Adelaide, Australia

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by 60moo » Mon Jul 18, 2016 3:20 pm

.
Last edited by 60moo on Mon Jul 18, 2016 3:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
60moo
Posts: 1790
Joined: Fri Nov 28, 2008 11:35 am
Location: Adelaide, Australia

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by 60moo » Mon Jul 18, 2016 3:20 pm

David_Norton wrote:The fixation on female player's appearance and clothing choices, versus their musical talents.
[But Galina Vale is asking for it! :lol:]

Classical music played on the CG at a recital (or similar) requires a certain convention in its playing and formality in its presentation - hence the need for both genders to 'look the part'. Naturally, both men and women (don't kid yourselves, ladies) will scrutinize the performer's appearance......if for somewhat different reasons.

Would food, dished-up as a "dog's breakfast" by an otherwise excellent cook at the local diner, appeal in the same way were it exquisitely presented by an equally good chef at a top-notch restaurant? I'd think not. Similarly, music's appeal is not only limited to one's ears.

Then again, perhaps those who are fixated by appearance just haven't yet developed the appropriate musical taste.

User avatar
Granary Guitars
Posts: 338
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 12:59 pm
Location: Carmarthenshire, West Wales

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by Granary Guitars » Mon Jul 18, 2016 3:35 pm

Nick Clow wrote:
Here's the thing. In my direct experience, amateur CG players almost invariably try to play pieces well beyond their grade level. Someone who might be able to give a very passable rendition of "Lagrima", instead tries "Capricho Arabe". Someone who could play Ponce's "Tres Canciones" reasonably well instead chooses (with their teacher's full connivance!) to inflict "Theme Varie et Final" on the audience. And so forth.

I leaned MY lesson years ago, and I simply don't try to play anything past about Grade V levels. My own Damascus Moment came from reading a 1939 interview in "The New Yorker" with the famed German pianist Wilhelm Bachaus. He said "Why seek difficulty when there is so much that is quite as beautiful and yet not difficult? Why try to make a bouquet of oak trees, when the ground is covered with exquisite wildflowers?" And Bachaus possessed a true virtuoso technique, so that things like the Beethoven piano sonatas, Liszt's "Don Juan" Fantasy, the Brahms-Paganini variations, and so forth were his standard concert fare. And there is no doubting whatsoever that the CG repertoire is overflowing with such "exquisite wildflowers" ready to be plucked (in BOTH senses of the verb!)
These are wise words here and I am on the same page with my playing and aspirations. Rather than torture myself for weeks trying to play a grade 7 or 8 piece (that I end up not being able to play with a high degree of security), it's far preferable to learn a grade 5 or 6 piece. They are usually close to being sight-readable and come together quickly, meaning the process is fun. Once learned, I can play them securely.

I am always on the look out for 'wildflowers' up to grade 5 or 6. Obviously there's stuff like various Sor studies, the Brouwer studies, Pavlovits, Yvonne Bloor, various Carcassi and Carulli studies, Peter Nuttall, various Tarrega pieces and Sagreras..

Feel free to point me to any other stand outs in this grade range, good tips appreciated.
Mauro Giuliani wrote a lovely set of pieces which (from memory) are not difficult and totally fit the bill. Look for "Choix de Mes Fleurs Cheries" - 'A Choice of my favourite flowers' - includes Carnation, Jasmine, Myrtle etc.

kervoas
Posts: 126
Joined: Sat Aug 06, 2011 1:10 pm
Location: Bude, Cornwall, UK

Re: What's the most cringiest thing about guitar culture?

Post by kervoas » Mon Jul 18, 2016 4:07 pm

Back to the cringeometer.
Nodding does it for me. I can hear the beat thanks, without having it nodded to me.
I too live in a wood - one might have guessed.
“The only escapes from the miseries of life are music and cats”
Albert Schweitzer

Return to “Public Space”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Adrian Allan, Altophile, Archibal, Briant, CommonCrawl [Bot], Granary Guitars, hackedpineapple, OldPotter, Portland Bill and 8 guests