Famous musicians' secondary careers

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
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pogmoor
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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by pogmoor » Wed Dec 28, 2016 12:47 pm

Before he retired folk singer Roy Bailey was professor of sociology at Sheffield University.
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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by Dirck Nagy » Wed Dec 28, 2016 4:25 pm

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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by robert e » Wed Dec 28, 2016 5:32 pm

montana wrote:
robert e wrote:Dedicated bongo drummer Richard Feynman won a Nobel Prize in physics.
Bongo drummer . ...surely your joking
:D Well, he must have mastered more than six easy pieces, as he played them in pit orchestras.

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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by guitarrista » Wed Dec 28, 2016 5:58 pm

robert e wrote:
montana wrote:
robert e wrote:Dedicated bongo drummer Richard Feynman won a Nobel Prize in physics.
Bongo drummer . ...surely your joking
:D Well, he must have mastered more than six easy pieces, as he played them in pit orchestras.
Still :-) a bit of a stretch to call Feynman a famous musician. I mean, the guy hated music, after all! Meaning he had said it did nothing for him, it was like tasting sand.. I guess him being an exceptional genius in one field did take away from some perception in a different field.. But I suppose he was rhythmical and so he took up the bongo - an inharmonic instrument - which demonstrated sufficiently his indifference to melody or harmony :lol:
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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by robert e » Sat Dec 31, 2016 6:12 pm

guitarrista wrote: Still :-) a bit of a stretch to call Feynman a famous musician. I mean, the guy hated music, after all! Meaning he had said it did nothing for him, it was like tasting sand.. I guess him being an exceptional genius in one field did take away from some perception in a different field.. But I suppose he was rhythmical and so he took up the bongo - an inharmonic instrument - which demonstrated sufficiently his indifference to melody or harmony :lol:
:lol: Funny! But also hogwash. Feynman loved music with a passion. As with any other of his interests, though, he liked what he liked and everything else was useless to him. He was almost exclusively interested in rhythm and rhythmic complexity, and allergic to structured forms, so he delved into tribal music, and he loved samba. Yes, it's appropriate to call him a musician--percussionists are musicians, too, and he was more dedicated and gigged more than many of us on this forum. And he was well known for it.

He had very narrow musical interests, obviously (though even there, perhaps not even as narrow as some of our fellow members :wink: ). Specialization doesn't disqualify a musician, or translate to "hating" music. Music has many forms and many roles. It's scope is not defined by any one person's tastes and preferences.

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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by guitarrista » Sat Dec 31, 2016 8:09 pm

robert e wrote:
guitarrista wrote: Still :-) a bit of a stretch to call Feynman a famous musician. I mean, the guy hated music, after all! Meaning he had said it did nothing for him, it was like tasting sand.. I guess him being an exceptional genius in one field did take away from some perception in a different field.. But I suppose he was rhythmical and so he took up the bongo - an inharmonic instrument - which demonstrated sufficiently his indifference to melody or harmony :lol:
:lol: Funny! But also hogwash. Feynman loved music with a passion.
I remembered now where I read about Feynman and music being like tasting sand. It is from the well known biography of Feynman by James Gleick: "Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman". On page 65 we find the following:
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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by Laudiesdad69 » Sat Dec 31, 2016 8:22 pm

Brian May was a college chancellor and Astro physicist, as well as a guitar seller/ designer. He is also an animal rights activist.

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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by robert e » Sat Dec 31, 2016 10:40 pm

guitarrista wrote:
robert e wrote:
guitarrista wrote: Still :-) a bit of a stretch to call Feynman a famous musician. I mean, the guy hated music, after all! Meaning he had said it did nothing for him, it was like tasting sand.. I guess him being an exceptional genius in one field did take away from some perception in a different field.. But I suppose he was rhythmical and so he took up the bongo - an inharmonic instrument - which demonstrated sufficiently his indifference to melody or harmony :lol:
:lol: Funny! But also hogwash. Feynman loved music with a passion.
I remembered now where I read about Feynman and music being like tasting sand. It is from the well known biography of Feynman by James Gleick: "Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman". On page 65 we find the following:

Capture.JPG
That was Feynman as a student. Later in the book, Gleick relates how in Rio the adult Feynman, finally exposed to music outside American academia's idea of "culture", fell in love with samba, joined a samba school, took up the frigideira and took part in carnaval. He remained infatuated with samba and other third world music the rest of his life. That's not someone who "hates music". That's the Feynman who organized conga lines at Los Alamos parties. As Gleick points out, it turns out what he hated was the way music was regarded in his academic circles--as part of a standardized "being cultured" package.

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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by robert e » Sat Dec 31, 2016 11:35 pm

Before Sting became Sting, he was Gordon Sumner the bus conductor, then construction worker, then tax officer, then schoolteacher who played jazz in the evenings.

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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by richardm » Sat Dec 31, 2016 11:39 pm

Don't forget Brian Cox, well known physicist, TV presenter and former keyboard player in the pop group D:Ream.
I also remember Patrick Moore was an accomplished xylophone player.

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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by malc laney » Sun Jan 01, 2017 11:00 am

Not a bad collection ! But am looking foward to finding out D.Trump was a pridigy on something?

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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Sun Jan 01, 2017 6:52 pm

While-ago British Prime Minister Edward Heath could conduct an orchestra pretty well. And sail a yacht.
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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by Custard » Mon Jan 02, 2017 1:45 am

Einstein liked to play in an amateur string quartet. There's a story that other members of his quartet complained that Einstein couldn't count.

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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by Nick Clow » Mon Jan 02, 2017 1:56 am

Einstein: "I could give up physics, but I could never give up music" (purportedly).

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Re: Famous musicians' secondary careers

Post by bear » Mon Jan 02, 2017 1:37 pm

Stephen Kenyon wrote:While-ago British Prime Minister Edward Heath could conduct an orchestra pretty well. And sail a yacht.
I'll bet he could do both at the same time.
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