Stage fright

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
belminokanovic
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Stage fright

Post by belminokanovic » Thu Feb 16, 2017 8:35 am

Hello,

Here is one important topic.
How do you deal with stage fright?

Greetings,

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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: Stage fright

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Thu Feb 16, 2017 9:31 am

By regularly playing in public, starting small with carefully planned, successful steps; and by having the attitude that the audience is one's friend, not a bunch of negatively critical enemies ... and by not expecting perfection.
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PeteJ
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Re: Stage fright

Post by PeteJ » Thu Feb 16, 2017 12:12 pm

No, no. The audience is there to listen out for mistakes and criticise whenever possible. They don't like you and would much rather be somewhere else. They find the guitar boring anyway. They don't like your choice of pieces and find your playing unmusical and wonder how you can have the nerve to charge admission.

What do you mean paranoid?

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Jim Davidson
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Re: Stage fright

Post by Jim Davidson » Thu Feb 16, 2017 1:40 pm

Step 1. Play in front of people whenever you can

Step 2. Repeat Step 1
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cedartop
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Re: Stage fright

Post by cedartop » Thu Feb 16, 2017 2:42 pm

I think for most people, the biggest fear is probably that not that you will make a mistake, or not play as musically as you wish, but that you will forget where you are and have to stop the piece. To be less fearful, you have to know that you really know the piece. If you can visualize both hands (away from the music or guitar) in tempo, then you know the piece. If you can write out the music from memory without the guitar, then you know the music. If you know that you have not only muscle memory, but additional memory chains as evidenced by the ability to do the above activities, then you will not be concerned about forgetting the piece. You will also be training your mind to stay focused completely through the piece. In my experience, losing your train of thought is the culprit, because when you come back into focus, you have already broken the muscle memory chain.
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JohnyZuper
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Re: Stage fright

Post by JohnyZuper » Thu Mar 02, 2017 9:13 pm

Visualizing the playing and writing the music from memory are very good tips to test how well one knows a piece. Thanks! (I also have trouble performing)
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Adrian Allan
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Re: Stage fright

Post by Adrian Allan » Thu Mar 02, 2017 9:26 pm

By having the sheet music in front of me - so the stress of remembering is instantly defeated.

Butch Alan
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Location: Phila. Pa.

Re: Stage fright

Post by Butch Alan » Fri Mar 03, 2017 5:50 pm

I don't care what you do, it never goes away completely and it shouldn't. Keeps you on your toes.

Alan Green
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Re: Stage fright

Post by Alan Green » Fri Mar 03, 2017 9:39 pm

My method:

1 - be properly rehearsed and prepared before you go on

2 - play something at the start of the show that you can play well and isn't too complicated. My show opens with Manuel de Falla's Miller's Dance, from the three-cornered hat

dory
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Re: Stage fright

Post by dory » Sun Mar 05, 2017 1:50 am

I got over much of my stage fright and then it came back. I think it may be a constant struggle for many of us.
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bear
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Re: Stage fright

Post by bear » Sun Mar 05, 2017 2:16 am

Everyone has great advice but for some stage fright is forever i.e. elvis. If the above advice doesn't work (and try it first) look at Propranolol.
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2handband
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Re: Stage fright

Post by 2handband » Sun Mar 05, 2017 4:05 am

Picture the audience naked, they say...

I dunno, mostly be really really prepared. The only times I really have trouble with stagefright is when I'm doing standins and have to learn 20-40 songs really fast. You don't know what nervous is until you're staring down at a setlist trying to connect the next title with some music in your head.

If know the material up one side and down the other I can usually walk onstage completely relaxed.

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lucy
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Re: Stage fright

Post by lucy » Sun Mar 05, 2017 7:26 pm

Stephen Kenyon wrote:By regularly playing in public, starting small with carefully planned, successful steps; and by having the attitude that the audience is one's friend, not a bunch of negatively critical enemies.. and by not expecting perfection.
That's a great summary Stephen! Thanks.

I'd also like to echo other people's points about the importance of thorough preparation. Even so, you can never tell exactly how a performance is going to go!
“Do what you can, with what you have, where you are”. Theodore Roosevelt

2handband
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Re: Stage fright

Post by 2handband » Tue Mar 07, 2017 3:41 am

lucy wrote:
Stephen Kenyon wrote:By regularly playing in public, starting small with carefully planned, successful steps; and by having the attitude that the audience is one's friend, not a bunch of negatively critical enemies.. and by not expecting perfection.
That's a great summary Stephen! Thanks.

I'd also like to echo other people's points about the importance of thorough preparation. Even so, you can never tell exactly how a performance is going to go!
You can't, but one huge tip is that no matter how much you screw up you should make sure you look awesome doing it! I'm serious, actually. If you screw up don't stop for anything (if you have to repeat a section because you forgot the next one for god's sake do it) and continue to look utterly relaxed and oblivious. Smile... this is too much fun to care about a little mistake! Above all else do not tense up. I've seen great players completely freeze and do a terrible show the moment they make their first boo boo and you can't do that! It's over, the moment is gone forever, and just keep it firmly in your mind that the next few moments are going to be AWESOME. Maintaining the right mental attitude is everything. I know it sounds like psycho babble but proven psychology: if you spend five minutes telling yourself how awesome you are before going on, you will probably do a better show. The trick is you have to keep believing it even after you make that first mistake.

Laudiesdad69
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Re: Stage fright

Post by Laudiesdad69 » Tue Mar 07, 2017 4:40 am

bear wrote:Everyone has great advice but for some stage fright is forever i.e. elvis. If the above advice doesn't work (and try it first) look at Propranolol.
Made me laugh :D

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