Questions

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
Doug Crosswell
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Questions

Post by Doug Crosswell » Wed Jul 12, 2017 8:11 pm

Me and a good friend were visiting the art gallery of ontario . I haven't made this known , but I always loved visual art . If I wasn't into classical guitar and music in general , art would of been the next thing for me.

Also , my best friend who is a classical sitarist , once told me that learning , practicing and playing classical music is a fine art .

So after visiting the art gallery , we talked about art in general and how we both believe that their isn't much of an audience for art and he believes it's because of money .

Which makes me wonder , are we collectively becoming a minority on the verge becoming extinct and if so , is this a new trend or have we been on this trend for a long time now .

I just want to state that I believe classical guitar is a fine art because we predominately play classical music and fine art to me anyways is a valid label due to the level of attention and detail that is required .

Do you think these statements that I have made are valid . Is their a measure of truth in them ?

What are your thoughts ?

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: Questions

Post by Rick Beauregard » Thu Jul 13, 2017 5:43 pm

Doug Crosswell wrote:
Wed Jul 12, 2017 8:11 pm
Which makes me wonder , are we collectively becoming a minority on the verge becoming extinct and if so , is this a new trend or have we been on this trend for a long time now .

What are your thoughts ?
As an ecologist I learned that bio diversity is healthy and mono cultures are unhealthy and prone to disastrous collapse. So it was worth the effort to prevent extinction of even the most obscure species to maintain genetic diversity. The same may be true of culture. So maybe we should view ourselves as artists attempting to maintain cultural diversity and prevent extinction of our art so future generations can enjoy what otherwise may go extinct. I think there is a trend as we get more automated to value more the skills of the artist and artisans.
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Andrew Pohlman
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Re: Questions

Post by Andrew Pohlman » Thu Jul 13, 2017 7:57 pm

Doug Crosswell wrote:
Wed Jul 12, 2017 8:11 pm
Which makes me wonder , are we collectively becoming a minority on the verge becoming extinct and if so , is this a new trend or have we been on this trend for a long time now .
In the SF Bay Area, classical is pretty much dead in terms of audiences and making a living. Other forms of music thrive just fine, and people who choose to be professional musicians can make a modest living - just not with classical.

So are we a dying breed? I think it's like habitats, yes, we are dying in some places, but doing fine in others.
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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: Questions

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Thu Jul 13, 2017 9:12 pm

The death of the arts has been predicted with regularity since they invented arts, and while of course there is plenty of fluctuation, it seems to me there is a strong tendency for them to hang in there.

As an example, in the 1980s I used to often go to the then local orchestral concerts (Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra). I was usually pretty much the only 20 something there, the average age of the audience was probably about 60. And the average is still about 60, 30 years later!
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Paul Janssen
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Re: Questions

Post by Paul Janssen » Thu Jul 13, 2017 9:37 pm

I have two nephews one 17, the other 21. They have both been in choirs since they were quite young. The younger is now in a local youth chorale, the older recently joined the Melbourne Bach Choral. They have both performed in several operas and sung with several fine orchestras including the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra.

I have attended many of their performances and to be honest most of them weren't really my thing. But in all the performances I have attended they have played to full houses and very appreciative audiences.

If you asked kids today what they think of the Beatles, I'm sure they would say that they rarely (if ever) listen to them. Trends come and trend go, but good music lives on.

Adrian Allan
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Re: Questions

Post by Adrian Allan » Sun Jul 16, 2017 7:17 pm

The chance of making a living from playing the classical guitar is very remote, even for excellent players.

However, the medium of Youtube is ideally suited to the classical guitar, and there is certainly a thriving culture there - with both vintage and new videos being put there all the time.

So part of it is that people just don't make the effort to watch live music, they would rather sit at home with headphones on and watch world class players on Youtube. I know it's not quite the same, but it's still pretty good to hear and watch the world's best players when I want. I couldn't do that over ten years ago.

Laudiesdad69
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Re: Questions

Post by Laudiesdad69 » Mon Jul 17, 2017 2:36 am

I get my classical guitar entertainment mainly from YouTube. I am really thankful for it, as I can't really count on making it through a live performance in a hall somewhere as I never know when I'm going to have to take that ride in the back of the ambulance with the friendly paramedic.

I wish that I could, but there is hardly any classical guitarists who come to my area anyway. Sharon Isbin was in town for a week of events, and I caught an hour long performance at my favorite local music store. I was however too ill to make the master class the next day and I was sick for her performance with the local symphony. So yeah, I don't even try anymore.

That being said, if Andrew York or God willing, John Williams came to town I would buy tickets, and attend in my pajamas with I.V. pole in tow if I had to. However, that would probably ruin it for the other people who paid to see it.

Andrew Pohlman
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Re: Questions

Post by Andrew Pohlman » Mon Jul 17, 2017 4:20 pm

Stephen Kenyon wrote:
Thu Jul 13, 2017 9:12 pm
The death of the arts has been predicted with regularity since they invented arts, and while of course there is plenty of fluctuation, it seems to me there is a strong tendency for them to hang in there.

As an example, in the 1980s I used to often go to the then local orchestral concerts (Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra). I was usually pretty much the only 20 something there, the average age of the audience was probably about 60. And the average is still about 60, 30 years later!
And the arts have long been the territory of colleges and universities. These institutions have a vested interest in preservation of historical forms. And many musicians are "classically trained" but transition to pop music to make money. Pat Benatar was trained as an opera singer. Yngwie Malmsteen was trained as a classical guitarist. I'm sure there are many, many others who fit this category.

Said a little differently, there are tons of kids studying classical forms at my local music school: violin, guitar, piano, cello, etc. But the money is not in classical. So by natural reality, students gravitate to other professions or more commercial forms of music. My instructor said of all the people who graduated with him from the SF Conservatory, he is the only one still doing music professionally. All others have moved on to other careers.
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Doug Crosswell
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Re: Questions

Post by Doug Crosswell » Fri Jul 21, 2017 11:08 pm

First off . Sorry I haven't replied recently . I was having a conversation with a close friend of mine about whether their is a market for artists that mainly play classical guitar , she believes that if their were publishers like video game publishers to promote classical music , then perhaps it could create a market for classical music to thrive.

I think what needs to happen is that their needs to be a demographic shift and to take classical guitar for example and find a way that can make it more appealing to a younger audience .

I think radio can also be influential . If more classical music was played on radio it would be listened too and that can also help .

As to why I think classical guitar and classical music is hard to make a living at it is because I personally find it to be an acquired taste .
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Overall , I think the classical music community can change the course of classical music , but it would require some a reinvention of some sort and innovation as well . But that's me

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