Fiddle tunes for Classical Guitar

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
Altophile
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Re: Fiddle tunes for Classical Guitar

Post by Altophile » Thu Oct 12, 2017 3:52 pm

Bill Piburn had an entire anthology of fiddle tunes for the acoustic guitar published by Mel Bay:

Title: Complete Book of Fiddle Tunes for Acoustic Guitar

~Sean

Altophile
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Re: Fiddle tunes for Classical Guitar

Post by Altophile » Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:06 pm

Altophile wrote:
Thu Oct 12, 2017 3:52 pm
Bill Piburn had an entire anthology of fiddle tunes for the acoustic guitar published by Mel Bay:

Title: Complete Book of Fiddle Tunes for Acoustic Guitar

~Sean
Oops, I just noticed that Karen already mentioned this anthology. Sorry:-(

~Sean

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bert
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Re: Fiddle tunes for Classical Guitar

Post by bert » Fri Oct 13, 2017 12:52 pm

Sandaun wrote:
Wed Oct 11, 2017 7:24 am
Has anyone ever transcribed or recomposed any fiddle tunes for classical guitar?
Like this?
devilshornpipe.png
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Karen
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Re: Fiddle tunes for Classical Guitar

Post by Karen » Fri Oct 13, 2017 11:52 pm

Razz- Devil’s Dream is in the Mel Bay book mentioned above.

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guitareleven
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Re: Fiddle tunes for Classical Guitar

Post by guitareleven » Sat Oct 14, 2017 12:09 am

Sure, I've done it. One common ground between guitar and fiddle, of course, is O'Carolan. Though he was a harper, and wrote his tunes for that instrument a lot of them have been absorbed into the "traditional" fiddle repertoire, and, there are also many arrangements of them for, and recordings of them, on guitar as well. At the dawn of time, I used to "second" for a fiddle player in New Hampshire. I learned a lot of Irish, Scottish, and Cape Breton fiddle tunes from him. As for influence going in the other direction, i.e., from me to him, we also did arrangements I made, or that we obtained, of Renaissance pieces- I remember our including an Italian Saltarello (not the one apocryphally attributed to Galilleo's dad) in a St. Patrick's day concert, not because it had anything to do with Ireland, but pretty much on the strength of our having decided that , if it wasn't Irish, well then, it should have been! I think the audience appreciated both that and the piece. Even more remarkable was our having essayed and learned a sonata by Ernst Gottlieb Baron (which, believe it or not, we also did in the same concert), scored for guitar (lute) and flute (recorder). I think most people who have explored that repertoire would have encountered it. It was a new sort of thing for my friend, but he bravely took on the task, he did it very well. But, the interesting thing was, his being thoroughly a fiddle player and not a violinist, he, of course, played it like a fiddle player. In doing so, he imbued it with a peculiarly ineffable spirit, a particular sort of elan, that I'm not sure could have been replicated by a more classically trained violinist. There was something rougher about it, perhaps, but certainly not inept, or having thereby come off as naive or unsophisticated -- but he somehow he made it come alive in a manner redolent of a peasant vitality that may not have been as removed to the periphery of musical life in the Baroque as it is today. Maybe this informs a closeness whereby dance forms like allemandes and bourrees were lifted from their origins and appropriated into the cosmopolitan milieu of courtly life by finding place in suites written for the enjoyment of the aristocracy.

Sorry for the tangent- but, yes, it's been done- I'm certainly not the only guy who has done so; I don't even think I'm a rare example of such-- and it's something worth doing. One good thing about it is that, because of the musical patterning and the prevailing diatonicism of the melodies, its good intermediary training in the the inner ear comprehension on which sight reading skills should best be founded, in the sense of comprehending the music directly from the score , and then using ones rapport with the instrument to reproduce that understanding, rather than availing oneself of the score as a mechanistic and complicated pseudo-tablature, upon the execution of which the music is appreciated as an end by-product of the exercise.

razz
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Re: Fiddle tunes for Classical Guitar

Post by razz » Sat Oct 14, 2017 7:06 pm

Karen wrote:
Fri Oct 13, 2017 11:52 pm
Razz- Devil’s Dream is in the Mel Bay book mentioned above.
Thanks Karen, I'll have a look at it.

dwpc
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Re: Fiddle tunes for Classical Guitar

Post by dwpc » Sun Oct 15, 2017 12:27 am

"Niel Gow's Lament On The Death of His Second wife" is a very lovely 18th Century fiddle tune that translates beautifully to classical guitar. David Russell recorded it for his "Messages From the Sea" album of Celtic tunes, and his arrangement is excellent.
Played here by Rory Russell: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gd_-pmTDhwU
2001 Model 1B from Casa Parramon, Barcelona; set up by Rubio in Los Angeles. Also a Guild flat top and Alvarez baritone.

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Erik Zurcher
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Re: Fiddle tunes for Classical Guitar

Post by Erik Zurcher » Sun Oct 15, 2017 6:38 am

dwpc wrote:
Sun Oct 15, 2017 12:27 am
"Niel Gow's Lament On The Death of His Second wife" is a very lovely 18th Century fiddle tune that translates beautifully to classical guitar. David Russell recorded it for his "Messages From the Sea" album of Celtic tunes, and his arrangement is excellent.
Played here by Rory Russell: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gd_-pmTDhwU
+1
There is a nice arrangement from fellow member David Crooks here: viewtopic.php?f=12&t=54786
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"While you try to master classical guitar, prepare for a slave's life: the guitar will forever be your master and you its slave".

Ceciltguitar
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Re: Fiddle tunes for Classical Guitar

Post by Ceciltguitar » Mon Oct 16, 2017 1:54 am

Not classical guitar arrangements, but the following guitarists have published books of arrangements of fiddle tunes for guitar:

Steve Kauffman
Dan Crary
Tony Rice
Clarence White
Duck Baker
Tommy Flint
Orrin Starr

Tommy Flint has a book published by Mel Bay on crosspicking for guitar that includes a nice arrangement of "Devil's Dream". It's probably out of print.

Duck Baker's arrangements are fingerstyle.

Some of David David Russell's arrangements are of traditional Irish and Scottish dance tunes, jigs and reels.

Mel Bay has at least a few books of fiddle tunes, some books for flat picking, others for fingerstyle and / or "Classical " guitar.

Allan Alexander has a book entitled "Celtic music for guitar" that include some traditional Irish fiddle tunes.

Duck Baker's classic " Irish Scottish English and American fiddle tunes for the fingerpicking guitarist" is a real treasure, if you can find it.

Http://thesession.org has thousands of traditional Irish tunes, including jigs, reels, slip jigs, polkas etc. - traditional Irish dance music.

Altophile
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Re: Fiddle tunes for Classical Guitar

Post by Altophile » Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:27 am

dwpc wrote:
Sun Oct 15, 2017 12:27 am
"Niel Gow's Lament On The Death of His Second wife" is a very lovely 18th Century fiddle tune that translates beautifully to classical guitar. David Russell recorded it for his "Messages From the Sea" album of Celtic tunes, and his arrangement is excellent.
Played here by Rory Russell: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gd_-pmTDhwU
Very nice playing, and I really like the sound of Rory's guitar.

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