Songwriting

Theory and practice of composition and arranging for classical guitar, discussion of works in progress, etc.
Forum rules
III Our MP3, WMV, MOV, OGG, AVI, Authors' rights

Composers' Workshop
Theory and practice of composition and arranging for classical guitar, discussion of works in progress, etc.

Once you have subscribed to the 002 group, you can attach the following types of files to your messages:
Audio : .mp3 .ogg .wav .flac
Video : .avi .flv .mov .wmv
Score : .pdf .jpg .gif .png
Finale: .mus
Doug Crosswell
Posts: 200
Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2012 9:05 pm
Location: Toronto

Songwriting

Post by Doug Crosswell » Thu Dec 13, 2012 4:38 pm

Hello again . I like to song write but I admit I'm still a novice. most of my songwriting I have done in the past was on steel string acoustic. I like a lot of the traditional hyms we sing in my church and I also like creating my own Christian music.

I was wondering though ,is it possible for me to write songs with lyrics on CG. I know that CG isn't really made for strumming which I'm okay with,
but a lot of my music idea are a bit of upbeat , but of course I like to do slow songs as well. does most music on CG consist of pieces and instrumental ?

I really want to go all out on learning CG and try out composing , songwriting etc etc , but I'm worried I'll be limited.

User avatar
Anthony Campanella
Posts: 2373
Joined: Wed Dec 13, 2006 12:29 pm

Re: Songwriting

Post by Anthony Campanella » Thu Dec 13, 2012 5:07 pm

Good luck Merwood, we could use more songs for cg
You know the melody is usually the most important and most difficult element to accomplish
For accompaniment you could try arpeggios, base/chord - base/chord, etc

Gruupi
Posts: 1186
Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2007 12:11 am
Location: Dallas, TX

Re: Songwriting

Post by Gruupi » Fri Dec 14, 2012 6:14 pm

We tend to focus on instrumental guitar works on this forum, that is what most us want to do. But you can absolutely write "songs" for CG and voice or other combinations of instruments. I have heard some really good recitals for CG and voice. Maybe I am biased but a classical guitar player along with a female singer has a great appeal to me.

You say you worry that you will be limited? The only limitation is your imagination and talent.

I am not saying you are going to be accepted in the classical guitar community, they can be very conservative. The general public may or may not like what you do either, even if it is good. But if you are sincere about composing and guitar playing, you owe it to yourself to follow your artistic desires. DO IT!

Luthanick

Re: Songwriting

Post by Luthanick » Sun Dec 16, 2012 7:08 am

This post reminded me of when Christopher Parkening and Kathleen Battle did a classical guitar and voice album. You should check those pieces out. Also, I remember my instructor did very intricate guitar/lute and voice pieces, very medieval type music. I was always blown away when he performed them. I would love to hear more legitimate CG and voice pieces.

wrnr

Re: Songwriting

Post by wrnr » Sat Dec 22, 2012 11:12 pm

To inspire you, watch her singing and playing: it's such a beautiful combination, CG and voice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jdZdhKzJtXg

User avatar
KeMe
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 6242
Joined: Thu Jun 15, 2006 12:46 am
Location: Galveston County, Texas

Re: Songwriting

Post by KeMe » Wed Dec 26, 2012 6:45 am

Composing a song on a classical guitar really isn't any different from writing one for a steel string guitar. I think that the classical guitar and the voice make such a beautiful combination because each has it's own warmth.
As Anthony wrote, finding the melody is the most difficult part.
Once you have the melody, write down the notes in standard notation, tabs, or just letters. Sing your melody and accompany yourself. Write down the chords that you used above the melody, then work out how you want the chords to be played, as chords, to break into arpeggios or in any number of ways.
There are so many different ways to compose songs for a classical guitar.
The most important part for me is to write down the melody. If I don't write it down, I'll forget it by the next time I come back to work on it later. I've lost a lot of wonderful melodies because I didn't write them down at the time.

Kay :sorride:
Music touches the heart, but playing classical guitar can lift your heart and enrich your life.

herb
Posts: 262
Joined: Sat Sep 12, 2009 3:37 am
Location: Cedar Falls, Iowa

Re: Songwriting

Post by herb » Wed Dec 26, 2012 3:00 pm

KeMe wrote:.....As Anthony wrote, finding the melody is the most difficult part. Once you have the melody, write down the notes in standard notation, tabs, or just letters. Sing your melody and accompany yourself.......The most important part for me is to write down the melody. If I don't write it down, I'll forget it by the next time I come back to work on it later. ....
Ditto here. I used to carry a notebook in the car and sometimes pull off the road to jot down a melody or lyrics that came into my head. Harmonizing for me comes very naturally at the keyboard, but now that I occasionally do something for guitar, my teacher sometimes suggests jazz chords that I would not have considered.

Another suggestion would be to start with a short, simple project just to develop the melody, lyric, and harmony writing skills. It can be easy to get bogged down with a longer composition. There's a wealth of good, short, public domain poetry and folk songs out there that could be set into new songs, saving the need to create lyrics.

Herb

Bob Cleary

Re: Songwriting

Post by Bob Cleary » Wed Dec 26, 2012 3:04 pm

One of the big, free online university course companies (massive open online courses or MOOCs) is offering a songwriting course from Berklee starting I think in early March.


Peacefrog

Gene

Re: Songwriting

Post by Gene » Fri Aug 23, 2013 10:30 pm

I am composing just that myself. Look up the baroque period, these writers are the top flight which you ,mean by classic, Purcell etc. They are also christian as in Bach. Three part harmony is how you look at it not strum or not.

Gene

Re: Songwriting

Post by Gene » Fri Aug 23, 2013 10:46 pm

If you reach that level there is no limit its best to look at classical music as music and the others as recreation or money making or folkpeoples.ways. Look up "What is Art"by Tolstoy, he will explain thatthelimits are set up by money and wealth not art. Mozart could imitate any kind of music ,why because he knew music period and no one is more classical then he.

nicofitz

Re: Songwriting

Post by nicofitz » Tue Jun 03, 2014 1:38 pm

The first thing that came to my mind was John Dowland's lute songs. I guess what one means by classical guitar songwriting is songwriting that uses the guitar in a fingerstyle manner (as opposed to strumming) and which avoids repetitive picking patterns and repetitive harmonic patterns (i.e. in folk music). By this definition I think many, many songs (but not all) could be transcribed for classical guitar and voice from all the worlds of pop/jazz/classical.

A good example of someone who had great ability as a fingerstyle guitar player and who fused this with his vocal writing was Nick Drake. He also had a mind towards orchestration, so his guitar accompaniments are not always merely folk-style repetitions, but often indicate other musical ideas and possibilities. His Pink Moon album is a good example of songs written for 'mostly non-repetitive' fingerstyle + voice.

miotail

Re: Songwriting

Post by miotail » Tue Jun 10, 2014 1:28 am

cg technique and cg can be used for so many situations in music. I like to take works from popular songs and transcribe them for solo performance.

Smith
Posts: 1222
Joined: Thu Jun 20, 2013 4:17 am

Re: Songwriting

Post by Smith » Fri Apr 07, 2017 8:34 pm

Check out "Arther Sullivan's Songwriting Technique - David Owen Norris" on utoob.

neil
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri May 26, 2017 3:22 pm
Location: France Paris

Re: Songwriting

Post by neil » Mon May 29, 2017 7:51 pm

CG is appropriate for instrumental music but there's a lot of beautiful song played with it. Leonard Cohen was playing on Classical guitar.
After folk can open you different universe.
I think it's really interesting to play both of them.

Return to “Composers' Workshop”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot] and 3 guests