Getting from Mind to Music

Theory and practice of composition and arranging for classical guitar, discussion of works in progress, etc.
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Composers' Workshop
Theory and practice of composition and arranging for classical guitar, discussion of works in progress, etc.

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JMinkey

Getting from Mind to Music

Post by JMinkey » Thu Oct 16, 2014 11:38 pm

I have a problem where I think up good music inside my head, usually just in random parts of the day, but I cannot translate that music onto paper.

If anyone else has had any problems or experiences like this, could you share tips?

Thanks!

:merci:

mcmurray

Re: Getting from Mind to Music

Post by mcmurray » Fri Oct 17, 2014 4:57 am

Train your ears.

Learn movable do solfege (do major, la minor). Sing scales, arps and easy pieces straight from the score in solfeggio.

It simply works, and will get you exactly to where you want to be in the minimum amount of time. You have to put the effort in though! If you really want to do it quickly, join a choir and ask them to teach you to sight-sing.

BTW - before someone comes in here and tells you to learn to identify intervals, don't take any notice of them.

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Denian Arcoleo
Composer
Posts: 6059
Joined: Tue Jul 25, 2006 3:39 pm
Location: Somerset, England

Re: Getting from Mind to Music

Post by Denian Arcoleo » Fri Oct 17, 2014 6:02 am

mcmurray wrote:Train your ears.

Learn movable do solfege (do major, la minor). Sing scales, arps and easy pieces straight from the score in solfeggio.

It simply works, and will get you exactly to where you want to be in the minimum amount of time. You have to put the effort in though! If you really want to do it quickly, join a choir and ask them to teach you to sight-sing.

BTW - before someone comes in here and tells you to learn to identify intervals, don't take any notice of them.
All very good advice indeed. But what is wrong with identifying intervals?

mcmurray

Re: Getting from Mind to Music

Post by mcmurray » Fri Oct 17, 2014 7:06 am

Denian Arcoleo wrote:
mcmurray wrote:Train your ears.

Learn movable do solfege (do major, la minor). Sing scales, arps and easy pieces straight from the score in solfeggio.

It simply works, and will get you exactly to where you want to be in the minimum amount of time. You have to put the effort in though! If you really want to do it quickly, join a choir and ask them to teach you to sight-sing.

BTW - before someone comes in here and tells you to learn to identify intervals, don't take any notice of them.
All very good advice indeed. But what is wrong with identifying intervals?
Solfege practice will give you this skill, along with a solid sense of functional pitch recognition, i.e. hearing notes in the context of a key (or tonality).

Practicing identifying intervals will only give you the skill of identifying intervals, not functional pitch recognition. If you only practice intervals then want to transcribe a piece of music, you need to identify intervals between every successive note in real time - this is impossible.

When transcribing with functional pitch recognition, you simply write the notes as you hear them, there is no need to keep track of successive intervals in real time, and the task is about a million times easier.

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robin loops
Posts: 2949
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2012 8:57 am
Location: California

Re: Getting from Mind to Music

Post by robin loops » Fri Oct 17, 2014 3:00 pm

Also helpful to carry a small recording device (most smart phones will work but a dedicated device that you can just hit record with works better for creative flow). When you get an idea (in the middle of the day) sing, whistle or hum the melody into the recorder. Then try to work it out on the guitar later. Practicing a lot of chord based music (classic rock in my case) helped get familiar with keys and chord structure, etc. Practicing scales can help with becoming more familiar with melodic structure as well.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them.
-James-

mcmurray

Re: Getting from Mind to Music

Post by mcmurray » Sun Oct 19, 2014 2:48 pm

Google Mike Verta's website and go to it. Click on Podcasts and Tutorials, then listen to "The Mind's Ear".

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