Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

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Beowulf
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Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Beowulf » Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:02 pm

This may have been posted before. If so, my apologies. A wonderful example of what can be done to an old piece of junk... :mrgreen: 1957 Hauser II: http://www.crane.gr.jp/CRANE_Back_No/Ha ... chi/E.html
1971 Yamaha GC-10

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zavaletas
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by zavaletas » Fri Oct 13, 2017 12:06 am

Thanks for sharing this. I have rescued a lot of fine guitars, in worse shape-- and have yet to be disappointed. Fine guitars, made with great woods, when expertly restored, seem to be very resilient-- and seem to retain their greatness.
James, Zavaleta's La Casa de Guitarras

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Beowulf
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Beowulf » Fri Oct 13, 2017 12:29 am

zavaletas wrote:
Fri Oct 13, 2017 12:06 am
Thanks for sharing this. I have rescued a lot of fine guitars, in worse shape-- and have yet to be disappointed. Fine guitars, made with great woods, when expertly restored, seem to be very resilient-- and seem to retain their greatness.
You are most welcome. I am still amazed that my GC-10 has not developed any issues after 46 years and for many of those years I forgot to humidify it during the very dry winters here in Canada. Well aged Jacaranda and Ezo spruce have stood the test of time.
1971 Yamaha GC-10

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pogmoor
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by pogmoor » Fri Oct 13, 2017 9:46 pm

The most amazing piece of restoration I came across was of the lute that Jakob Lindberg plays. He obtained it at an auction as an evidently old lute that had been altered several time since it was made and it turned out that it had been built in 1590 by Sixtus Rauwolf maker in Augsburg. Although it looked a very nice instrument it was in extremely poor condition and it's painstaking restoration by two luthiers (with help from a violin maker) took several years. The UK Lute Society published an account of this by Michael Lowe (one of the luthiers who carried out the work) but I don't think this is available online, though it is referred to in this interview with Jakob Lindberg (search the page for Rauwolf to find the reference). The result is a beautiful sounding instrument.
Eric from GuitarLoot
Renaissance and Baroque freak; classical guitars by Paul Fischer (1995) and Lester Backshall (2008)
Yamaha SLG 130NW silent classical guitar (2014), Ramirez Guitarra del Tiempo (2017)

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Beowulf
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Beowulf » Sat Oct 14, 2017 1:46 am

pogmoor wrote:
Fri Oct 13, 2017 9:46 pm
The most amazing piece of restoration I came across was of the lute that Jakob Lindberg plays. He obtained it at an auction as an evidently old lute that had been altered several time since it was made and it turned out that it had been built in 1590 by Sixtus Rauwolf a maker in Augsburg. Although it looked a very nice instrument it was in extremely poor condition and it's painstaking restoration by two luthiers (with help from a violin maker) took several years. The UK Lute Society published an account of this by Michael Lowe (one of the luthiers who carried out the work) but I don't think this is available online, though it is referred to in this interview with Jakob Lindberg (search the page for Rauwolf to find the reference). The result is a beautiful sounding instrument.
Fascinating story of recovering the soul of a beautiful instrument...she's a treasure:
Rauwolf Lute 2 small.jpg
Rauwolf Lute small.jpg
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Justfun
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Justfun » Sat Oct 14, 2017 1:55 am

were you able analyze the black stuff?
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zavaletas
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by zavaletas » Sat Oct 14, 2017 2:20 am

Neat lute, great story.
James, Zavaleta's La Casa de Guitarras

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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by vesa » Sat Oct 14, 2017 6:30 am

Thanks. Very interesting to see a master fixing an other masters guitar.
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Michael.N. » Sat Oct 14, 2017 10:22 am

The very best tend to be the specialist violin restorers. It's partly down to the general value of violins being that much higher than the value of guitars. No one is going to trust a £100,000 + violin with someone who isn't fully trained and has a very high reputation in repairs. These people don't tend to be makers, just specialists in repair and restoration.
That Hauser restoration. Sorry but I'm not sure I like the method of the soundboard splints at all.
Historicalguitars.

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Beowulf
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Beowulf » Sat Oct 14, 2017 12:20 pm

Michael.N. wrote:
Sat Oct 14, 2017 10:22 am
That Hauser restoration. Sorry but I'm not sure I like the method of the soundboard splints at all.
What method would you recommend?
1971 Yamaha GC-10

Jack Douglas
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Jack Douglas » Sat Oct 14, 2017 1:16 pm

Fascinating story of Andrea’s restoration work. Thanks for posting!
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Michael.N.
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Michael.N. » Sat Oct 14, 2017 2:04 pm

Beowulf wrote:
Sat Oct 14, 2017 12:20 pm
Michael.N. wrote:
Sat Oct 14, 2017 10:22 am
That Hauser restoration. Sorry but I'm not sure I like the method of the soundboard splints at all.
What method would you recommend?
Well the end of the splints wouldn't be finished like that, they would be feathered. That's standard method and doesn't draw the eye to it.
Scroll down and whilst they aren't splints it does show how the ends are usually finished. Really good restorers can make a splint disappear. That does require a big selection of spruce and a lot of time carefully matching grain and reflection.

viewtopic.php?t=61226
Historicalguitars.

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zavaletas
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by zavaletas » Sat Oct 14, 2017 3:07 pm

I am having a 1843 Mateo Benedid guitar restored for my own collection. The guitar has been repaired before, but as is common, some of the repairs were poorly done. For example, the frets were a mess, some places where binding was missing had been filled with puddy of some sort. The fingerboard was coming up neat the nut, and needs to be reglued. The missing pieces of binding are being repaired properly, matching each of the thin, black and white, rows in the five or so inches where they were missing. The previous poor repairs are being corrected, as well as the couple of unrepaired cracks that it presented. The guitar itself has a particularly interesting history.

Mateo Benedid (1800-1878) was born in Cadiz, and was one of Josef Benedid Diaz (1760-1836) two sons, the other being Joaquin Benedid Diaz (1814-1854) who like their father were celebrated guitar makers. In his guitar method, Fernando Sor notes that “The guitars which I have always given the preference are those of Alonzo of Madrid, Pages and Benediz of Cadiz, Joseph and Manuel Martinez of Malaga, or Rada, successor and scholar of the latter, and those of M. Lacote of Paris.”

In 1843, when this guitar was made Mateo Benedid was living on the calle Herron, 132 with his wife Maria de los Dolores Sosa, and five children (one boy, and four girls). Two years previously, their two year old daughter had died, but his wife had just given birth to another daughter. Besides his own family, five members of his wife’s family shared these quarters. By 1845, his wife seems to have died, but he continued with his immediate family and in-laws. The picture that emerges is of a poor, hardworking guitar maker struggling to provide for a large family. Ultimately, he seems to have failed, and dies in 1878 in the Casa de Misericordia in Cadiz.

This 1843 Mateo Benedict guitar originally belonged to Captain John Bautista Rogers Cooper (1791-1872). The captain was born into a maritime family in Massachusetts, and arrived in Monterey, California then the capital of Mexican Alta California in 1823 as master of the ship Rover. In 1827, he married Geronima de Encarnacion Vallejo (1809-1902) who was the sister of General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo (1808-1890) who later became the military governor of Alta California.

Although in 1826 Captain Cooper sold the Rover and became a trader and rancher, he eventually returned to the sea. Between 1838 and 1844, in command of the Mexican Government's ship, the California, he sailed regularly up and down the coast between Monterey and Acapulco, (the nearest port to Mexico City) carrying mail, prisoners, and officials. In 1846, he made a voyage to Peru, and in 1849 as master of the Eveline, he sailed to China. The Captain seems to have picked up this 1843 Mateo Benedid guitar during one of his voyages between Monterey and Alcapulo between 1843 and 1846.

When Capitan Cooper died this guitar passed to his daughter Amelia Cooper (1844-1918) and then to her daughter Frances Mary Molera (1879 -1968), who was the former owner, T.N.'s (born 1938), grandmother's first cousin. T. N. knew her Aunt Frances (Fanny) well, and it was Frances who gave her this guitar.

Feeling it would be a shame if this guitar's 175 year history in California, as the personal property of these Monterey pioneer families could be lost, I asked T.N. to write down what she knew of it's history. She did this, and provided a few key pages from a book that she annotated to help one understand how this guitar descended through the family of General Vallejo to her.

[img]
1843MateoBenedid-bkx.jpg
1843MateoBenedid-ft.jpg
1843MateoBenedid=ftx.jpg
Captain John Cooper.jpg
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piotr
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by piotr » Sun Oct 15, 2017 8:05 am

This is fantastic restoration.

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Beowulf
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Beowulf » Sun Oct 15, 2017 4:19 pm

Michael.N. wrote:
Sat Oct 14, 2017 2:04 pm
Beowulf wrote:
Sat Oct 14, 2017 12:20 pm
Michael.N. wrote:
Sat Oct 14, 2017 10:22 am
That Hauser restoration. Sorry but I'm not sure I like the method of the soundboard splints at all.
What method would you recommend?
Well the end of the splints wouldn't be finished like that, they would be feathered. That's standard method and doesn't draw the eye to it.
Scroll down and whilst they aren't splints it does show how the ends are usually finished. Really good restorers can make a splint disappear. That does require a big selection of spruce and a lot of time carefully matching grain and reflection.

viewtopic.php?t=61226
Yes, I see...however the very poor original restoration attempt that had to be cleaned out may have made that pretty difficult/impossible.
1971 Yamaha GC-10

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