Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Jeffrey Armbruster
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby Jeffrey Armbruster » Fri Mar 03, 2017 1:10 am

nm
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rojarosguitar
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby rojarosguitar » Fri Mar 03, 2017 5:44 am

Jeffrey Armbruster wrote:nm


????
Music is a big continent with different landscapes and corners. Some of them I do visit frequently, some from time to time and some I know from hearsay only ...

CathyCate
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby CathyCate » Fri Mar 03, 2017 2:32 pm

I want to second the suggestion to seek out "young luthiers" who are on the way to becoming better known and established.

I am an intermediate player who considers herself extremely lucky and sitting in the guitar lap of luxury with Spruce/Maple treasures by Matt Chaffin and Andy Culpepper (a Forum member) respectively. Both are now (a brief time after my purchases) represented by an international dealer. My guitars, while not built specifically for me, were both great finds, suit my playing style very well and represent extremely good value for my investment. My teacher helped me with making both selections. Having a good advisor familiar with the classical guitar and the instrument marketplace is invaluable.

No plans to sell either, since I consider them "priceless". If only I could time the stock market like that! Enjoy your search and good luck with your decision making.

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twang
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby twang » Fri Mar 03, 2017 3:53 pm

I've always wondered what happens if you commission a guitar and it doesn't end up with the sound you wanted?
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby Lovemyguitar » Fri Mar 03, 2017 4:51 pm

twang wrote:I've always wondered what happens if you commission a guitar and it doesn't end up with the sound you wanted?

Many luthiers (of course, get this in writing beforehand) will allow a person to return a guitar that is not to their liking within a time frame (30 days is usual) with a refund (minus deposit, usually, and assuming there is no damage), and provided the guitar is of one of their "standard" designs (something very customised may be "all-sales-final", but again, one can agree to all the terms before the guitar is built).

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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby Jeffrey Armbruster » Fri Mar 03, 2017 4:53 pm

rojarosguitar wrote:
Jeffrey Armbruster wrote:nm


????


I've always assumed that this was an abbreviation for "never mind" when I saw it on line elsewhere, but I may be wrong. that's what I meant however. I can't figure out how to delete a post entirely and make it go away.
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Michael.N.
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby Michael.N. » Fri Mar 03, 2017 5:12 pm

Lovemyguitar wrote:
twang wrote:I've always wondered what happens if you commission a guitar and it doesn't end up with the sound you wanted?

Many luthiers (of course, get this in writing beforehand) will allow a person to return a guitar that is not to their liking within a time frame (30 days is usual) with a refund (minus deposit, usually, and assuming there is no damage), and provided the guitar is of one of their "standard" designs (something very customised may be "all-sales-final", but again, one can agree to all the terms before the guitar is built).


Non standard can be a bit of a nightmare for luthiers. Personally I wouldn't agree a non standard build if the client wasn't under an obligation to buy.
30 days seems a bit of a long trial period IMO. In any case one week or 10 days should be more than sufficient. Of course the longer the trial period the greater the chance of damage happening. Any ding/scratch is going to be time consuming to correct and it's going to cost the client a bit of money. The advantage is that you get to play the instrument in your own home, played at your own leisure. You can even invite friends around for second opinions.
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby souldier » Fri Mar 03, 2017 5:19 pm

twang wrote:I've always wondered what happens if you commission a guitar and it doesn't end up with the sound you wanted?


As said above, most luthiers provide a trial period. With most luthiers I've come across, this trial period is usually around 1 week only. The tricky thing with this is it can really be difficult to recognize the true sound of a guitar during the honey moon period. There is also the hopes that a newly strung guitar will sound better after its been broken in more. Plus the one who commissioned the guitar has gone through months or even years of patient waiting. Also players may feel that they are hurting or offending the luthier by sending a guitar back, and they sometimes don't have the courage or heart to give any negative feedback. I'd actually like to hear what luthiers around here think about receiving negative feedback/constructive criticism on their guitars.

For these reasons the safest bet is still to buy a guitar one can try in person while comparing it side by side with other excellent guitars to really know if they are getting a good value. If I were ever to commission a guitar brand new, I'd be absolutely sure to try at least one or more already made guitars from that luthier and compare it to other guitars before making that decision. Video clips and player testimonies simply aren't enough to really assess a guitar if you ask me. I've had to learn this the hard way.
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guitarrista
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby guitarrista » Fri Mar 03, 2017 5:28 pm

Jeffrey Armbruster wrote:
rojarosguitar wrote:
Jeffrey Armbruster wrote:nm


????


I've always assumed that this was an abbreviation for "never mind" when I saw it on line elsewhere, but I may be wrong. that's what I meant however. I can't figure out how to delete a post entirely and make it go away.


You cannot delete a post - it is a feature, not a bug. I thought nm = 'no message' - not sure why - but I like your version. In any case it is the same idea - nothing to see here, it is an empty post.
Last edited by guitarrista on Fri Mar 03, 2017 9:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Steve O
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby Steve O » Fri Mar 03, 2017 6:01 pm

Buy what you're happy with and what you can afford, then you are not buying an overpriced instrument.

We all have buyer's remorse - but if you are happy with the guitar, you will have a happy life.

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Michael.N.
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby Michael.N. » Fri Mar 03, 2017 8:06 pm

souldier wrote:
twang wrote:I've always wondered what happens if you commission a guitar and it doesn't end up with the sound you wanted?


As said above, most luthiers provide a trial period. With most luthiers I've come across, this trial period is usually around 1 week only. The tricky thing with this is it can really be difficult to recognize the true sound of a guitar during the honey moon period. There is also the hopes that a newly strung guitar will sound better after its been broken in more. Plus the one who commissioned the guitar has gone through months or even years of patient waiting. Also players may feel that they are hurting or offending the luthier by sending a guitar back, and they sometimes don't have the courage or heart to give any negative feedback. I'd actually like to hear what luthiers around here think about receiving negative feedback/constructive criticism on their guitars.

For these reasons the safest bet is still to buy a guitar one can try in person while comparing it side by side with other excellent guitars to really know if they are getting a good value. If I were ever to commission a guitar brand new, I'd be absolutely sure to try at least one or more already made guitars from that luthier and compare it to other guitars before making that decision. Video clips and player testimonies simply aren't enough to really assess a guitar if you ask me. I've had to learn this the hard way.


It's disappointing but as a maker you have to be pragmatic about such things. I doubt that any maker wants for someone to buy a guitar just because they feel obliged yet at the same time being underwhelmed by the sound of the guitar.
True story but I once sent a guitar to a player (no names) and within two days I received an email asking how he could return it. That was a bit of a shock considering that he had a 10 day trial period. He wasn't very happy with the trebles. I was so taken aback that I decided that I would pay for the shipping both ways, fearing that I had made a guitar that sounded complete junk. Once it had returned I opened the case, tuned the guitar and I couldn't understand why he felt the trebles so poor. I placed it straight back into the case and off it went to another player. Several days later I received an email saying how great the trebles sounded. As a maker it's highly unlikely you are going to please everyone. There are just too many players with their many differing views. I guess you do your best and hope that someone likes what you have made.
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby guitarseller345645 » Fri Mar 03, 2017 9:34 pm

Jeffrey Armbruster wrote:
rojarosguitar wrote:
Jeffrey Armbruster wrote:nm


????


I've always assumed that this was an abbreviation for "never mind" when I saw it on line elsewhere, but I may be wrong. that's what I meant however. I can't figure out how to delete a post entirely and make it go away.


That would be nvm....
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rojarosguitar
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby rojarosguitar » Fri Mar 03, 2017 10:48 pm

Jeffrey Armbruster wrote:
rojarosguitar wrote:
Jeffrey Armbruster wrote:nm


????


I've always assumed that this was an abbreviation for "never mind" when I saw it on line elsewhere, but I may be wrong. that's what I meant however. I can't figure out how to delete a post entirely and make it go away.


I looked it up and the official rendition is 'New Mexico'. Urban Dictionary gives some meanings, some of which ar quite ambiguous...
Music is a big continent with different landscapes and corners. Some of them I do visit frequently, some from time to time and some I know from hearsay only ...

Jeffrey Armbruster
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby Jeffrey Armbruster » Fri Mar 03, 2017 11:06 pm

O.K. I was delivering a hint to the op to look for a guitar in New Mexico, because there's a great deal to be had there...

I don't really speak internet and so I just try to guess the meaning of abbreviations from the context. OP means 'opinionated person', right?
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WoodNString
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Re: Tips on avoiding buying an overpriced instrument

Postby WoodNString » Fri Mar 03, 2017 11:10 pm

I would second the suggestion of finding something you really like. Play a large variety of guitars and don't fixate so much on price. A 2k guitar might blow you away while a 5k guitar feel like an average one. Having played lots and lots of cg's, there are few nowadays that would for me qualify as superb and when I play one of those, I then think about the price.


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