1970 Kurosawa?

Leon Victoriano
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Apr 02, 2017 11:19 am

1970 Kurosawa?

Post by Leon Victoriano » Mon May 15, 2017 12:43 pm

So I was browsing my country's e - b a y-ish website, and found this 1970 Kurosawa guitar for sale. I was wondering if any of you know about a Japanese lutheir named Kurosawa and have used his guitars? Do you have any tips and suggestions for people like me who are testing out 2nd hand guitars and analyzing their value and quality? The seller is selling this for 45,000 pesos, which is around 900 dollars. Do you think it's value is good even tho the price isn't as much? It's an all solid guitar made in the 1970s, I was thinking that it would be around 2000 dollars at the least. What are your thoughts?

Here are the specs and some photos as well.
top : solid cedar
back and sides : solid rosewood close grain (old wood)
neck : spanish cedar (one piece) with bone nut
headstock : spanish cedar with rosewood top
bridge : rosewood with bone saddle
scale : 660mm concert style
rosette : eight petal flowers
fretboard : macassar ebony

*According to the seller, there is also a one and a half inch crack on the soundboard near the neck of the guitar but apparently it doesn't affect the tone, how do I figure out if he's telling the truth?
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"To play wrong notes is insignificant; to play without passions is inexcusable."

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rinneby
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Re: 1970 Kurosawa?

Post by rinneby » Mon May 15, 2017 1:10 pm

I will answer you in a few minutes. You can entertain your self with the "We who love Japanese classical guitars" - thread until then ;)

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1973 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.80
2004 - Lars Jönsson Torres SE 114

You are the instrument, not the guitar

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rinneby
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Location: Sweden

Re: 1970 Kurosawa?

Post by rinneby » Mon May 15, 2017 1:56 pm

Tunesavuro Kurosawa (uncle to the still active Sumio Kurosawa) guitars are often considered beginner/intermediate instruments in Japan. Tunesavuro's No.1 is the lowest model and higher numbers (often) means better guitar. You can tell by looking at the details as well as the tuners that this is a lower end guitar. I'm almost certain this is not an all solid wood guitar. With this said it could very well be a good sounding and playing guitar, most Japanese vintage guitars are great, but don't expect it to be concert grade.

Right now you can get a Tunesavuro Kurosawa No.3 at j-guitar for 27.000 yen, that is much less than 900 dollars.

I hope this helps.

/Jon
Last edited by rinneby on Mon May 15, 2017 5:28 pm, edited 3 times in total.
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1973 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.80
2004 - Lars Jönsson Torres SE 114

You are the instrument, not the guitar

Leon Victoriano
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Apr 02, 2017 11:19 am

Re: 1970 Kurosawa?

Post by Leon Victoriano » Mon May 15, 2017 2:30 pm

Thank you so much for the advice!
So you're saying that the sides aren't solid? Which means the seller lied about the description?
If that's the case, how does one figure out if the sides. back, and also the front are solid or not? Is it just gonna be heavier than normal laminated guitars or is it gonna like make a different sound if i tap that part of the wood?
Also, one of my guitar friends said that identifying the tuners are one of the many ways to determine a guitar's value, assuming the tuners are default and not customized. What can you say about the tuners? How can I tell if tuners are good? Does this mean that just because tuners are gold plated doesnt mean theyre any good?

This is only going to be my 3rd guitar buy so I'm still quite new to the process of testing guitars out before buying them.
"To play wrong notes is insignificant; to play without passions is inexcusable."

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rinneby
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Re: 1970 Kurosawa?

Post by rinneby » Mon May 15, 2017 3:07 pm

Leon Victoriano wrote:
Mon May 15, 2017 2:30 pm
Thank you so much for the advice!
So you're saying that the sides aren't solid? Which means the seller lied about the description?
If that's the case, how does one figure out if the sides. back, and also the front are solid or not? Is it just gonna be heavier than normal laminated guitars or is it gonna like make a different sound if i tap that part of the wood?
Also, one of my guitar friends said that identifying the tuners are one of the many ways to determine a guitar's value, assuming the tuners are default and not customized. What can you say about the tuners? How can I tell if tuners are good? Does this mean that just because tuners are gold plated doesnt mean theyre any good?

This is only going to be my 3rd guitar buy so I'm still quite new to the process of testing guitars out before buying them.
Many Japanese guitars from the 60s and 70s were laminated, but still much better than todays standard. Only the high end ones where all solid. I wouldn't worry too much about this. However, the inside looks surface treated though which is a good thing to prevent cracking. The tuners have plastic buttons and the mechanics are very basic. They are probably not original, but could be, looks pretty new.

I'm not saying the seller is lying about the wood, maybe he/she doesn't know for sure. The best you can do is ask for more pictures inside/outside of the guitar, then it's easier to determine if the grain patterns are a match = solid woods.

The pictures are pretty low-res, but the saddle looks like plastic too. With all this said I'm sure its a totally fine guitar, probably much better than todays beginner guitars, but I doubt very much it's worth 900 dollars.

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1973 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.80
2004 - Lars Jönsson Torres SE 114

You are the instrument, not the guitar

MessyTendon
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Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2015 1:33 am

Re: 1970 Kurosawa?

Post by MessyTendon » Tue May 16, 2017 12:58 am

Yes I would pass on this one...Be very wary of guitar photos. I had a really promising japanese guitar that looked nice in the photos but when I went to look the Cedar top had raised cracks all over the place the fingerboard was cracked.

These things can be hidden in photos. Cracks aren't really a big deal, but sight unseen it's a huge risk. Pass on this one.

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