Turkowiak Guitars

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Beowulf
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Location: London, Ontario CANADA

Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by Beowulf » Fri Aug 25, 2017 3:12 am

kavor wrote:
Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:57 pm
Beowulf wrote:
Thu Aug 24, 2017 6:09 pm
kavor wrote:
Thu Aug 24, 2017 3:20 pm


There are no adversaries here, relax :)
Very relaxed...my tongue was in my cheek: :wink:
You, sir, you like double speak a lot.

Well, I realize some of those passages in my video should have been played differently :) But, lets just concentrate on the sound that the guitar is making, eh? Still not a guitar? :)
Kavor
I was making a general comment on debates from a humorous point of view; and not any comment on your instrument. The sound of an instrument will change a great deal depending on the player and the potential of any instrument can be better expressed and experienced as one develops one's skill in playing and interpreting music. Enjoy!
1971 Yamaha GC-10

Monteverde
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Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by Monteverde » Fri Aug 25, 2017 11:02 am

kavor wrote:
Thu Aug 24, 2017 3:36 pm
Jack Douglas wrote:
Thu Aug 24, 2017 1:52 pm
Kavor,

You haven't indicated where you are located. There my be a classical guitar society or classically trained guitar instructor near you. Someone mentioned technique, posture, holding the instrument and to prevent injury to yourself and getting the most from your new guitar it's important that you learn as much as you can to make the best use of it and your ability.
Regarding a Guitar Society; it's a great venue to meet like minded musicians, listen to a variety of guitars and improve your knowledge about the classical guitar.
Also, there's nothing like attending a classical guitar concert in an intimate setting to really appreciate what the guitar,in the hands of a dedicated and trained musician, can sound like.
Good luck.
Jack
I live in Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Kavor
Hi Kavor --

If you are looking for a classical guitar instructor in the Lebanon/Hanover, New Hampshire, area, I'd strongly suggest you consider William Ghezzi. You can easily find his website (through which you can contact him) and YouTube videos with an internet search. His next concert performance will take place on Sunday, November 12, 2017, at Dartmouth as part of the Vaughan Recital Series.

Another upcoming event that might be of interest to you: the Los Angeles Guitar Quartet will be performing at the Hopkins Center for the Arts at Dartmouth on Wednesday, September 13, 2017.

Best regards,
Jon

hatalap
Posts: 76
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2015 4:16 pm

Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by hatalap » Fri Aug 25, 2017 9:30 pm

kavor wrote:
Thu Aug 24, 2017 3:36 pm
Jack Douglas wrote:
Thu Aug 24, 2017 1:52 pm
Kavor,

You haven't indicated where you are located. There my be a classical guitar society or classically trained guitar instructor near you. Someone mentioned technique, posture, holding the instrument and to prevent injury to yourself and getting the most from your new guitar it's important that you learn as much as you can to make the best use of it and your ability.
Regarding a Guitar Society; it's a great venue to meet like minded musicians, listen to a variety of guitars and improve your knowledge about the classical guitar.
Also, there's nothing like attending a classical guitar concert in an intimate setting to really appreciate what the guitar,in the hands of a dedicated and trained musician, can sound like.
Good luck.
Jack
I live in Lebanon, New Hampshire. If you are not familiar, its that place Walter White gets to hide in the middle of nowhere (if you watched braking bad)

There are some cultural happenings here in upper valley. The teacher that I found is a great musician, really interesting fella, but he is not like traditional classical.

On the weekends I am in Boston. I went to watch David Russel in a small church. Yeah, that was a great experience.

Any good teachers in Boston that you know, perhaps? (I haven't done my homework here, there is Boston classical society but...)

Kavor
The Boston Classical Guitar Society is a decent place to start and there are likely many teachers at the David Russell concert. They also offer some guitar performance nights where you can likely talk with others about their teachers. PM me if you want specific recommendations or want to play some different guitars - I have a bunch.

Cheers

Paul

kavor
Posts: 59
Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2017 11:18 pm
Location: Boston MA

Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by kavor » Sat Aug 26, 2017 8:38 am

Jack Douglas wrote:
Fri Aug 25, 2017 12:47 am
kavor wrote:
Thu Aug 24, 2017 3:36 pm
Jack Douglas wrote:
Thu Aug 24, 2017 1:52 pm
Kavor,

You haven't indicated where you are located. There my be a classical guitar society or classically trained guitar instructor near you. Someone mentioned technique, posture, holding the instrument and to prevent injury to yourself and getting the most from your new guitar it's important that you learn as much as you can to make the best use of it and your ability.
Regarding a Guitar Society; it's a great venue to meet like minded musicians, listen to a variety of guitars and improve your knowledge about the classical guitar.
Also, there's nothing like attending a classical guitar concert in an intimate setting to really appreciate what the guitar,in the hands of a dedicated and trained musician, can sound like.
Good luck.
Jack
I live in Lebanon, New Hampshire. If you are not familiar, its that place Walter White gets to hide in the middle of nowhere (if you watched braking bad)

There are some cultural happenings here in upper valley. The teacher that I found is a great musician, really interesting fella, but he is not like traditional classical.

On the weekends I am in Boston. I went to watch David Russel in a small church. Yeah, that was a great experience.

Any good teachers in Boston that you know, perhaps? (I haven't done my homework here, there is Boston classical society but...)

Kavor
In Boston there's the New England Conservatory of music and Berklee School of music. I don't know the name of a classically trained teacher. I can almost bet that someone in the classical guitar society in Boston could recommend a good teacher.
You mentioned in another post that there are no guitar stores in Boston. However, in your area there are two well known luthiers, Stephen Connor and Aaron Green. Both of these luthiers make instruments that are sought after and performed with by touring professionals and enthusiastic hobbyists.
When I first started learning to play I took lessons from a really good musician that was not a 'classical' guy. He understood music and was enthusiastic, and I was quite happy learning a few songs. What he didn't know about or how to teach was the technique of playing a classical guitar. He had a well developed 'finger picking' style that worked well enough to get notes out of the guitar and he knew enough music theory ear training to jam with people. At the time that was all I wanted.
The rub came when I got my first luthier made guitar and joined a classical guitar society. In those meetings the classically trained musicians would play my guitar and it sounded like a real concert instrument. I finally quit lessons with the nice guy musician and took lessons from a graduate of one of the schools in Boston; I can't remember which one she attended. It was a profound change. I had to learn how to produce sound pressing down into the sound hole, not picking up at or across the strings, sitting properly to prevent injury to my back, filing and caring for my fingernails, holding the guitar in a balanced manner and using the hands and fingers in a relaxed manner to prevent injury. My new teacher exposed me to so much more that the playing of a few pieces. I've gone for periods of time without a teacher, but, have found that a skilled and engaged teacher is the best way to get the most out of whatever guitar I've owned.
I think it's great that you have a new guitar and it's one you like a lot. I also think it would be worth it to learn how to properly play if so you can then experience for yourself how much horsepower she's really got.
By chance is your teacher, Stuart Johnson, at Upper Valley Music Center. He's a North Carolina fellow and studied with David Stevenson at UNC Asheville. The UNC school is a two year program. He's closer that driving to Boston. You might also look up David William Ross, a Peabody Graduate. He is who I would be seeking to teach me because Peabody is one of the very best conservatories.
That's all I've got. Good luck.
Hi, I appreciate your thoughts and advice. I certainly could benefit from more proper instruction. I am in a bit of a transition for just couple of weeks. I want to get some things in order before I start anything. This guy David William Ross does some jazz on classical guitar I saw. I have dabbling in jazz for many years now. I want to play more classical music for some reason. If I could name one guy who like inspires me the most now is Andrew York. I don't exactly know what 'category' he belongs to. I don't care really, it just seems he played a lot of classical guitar to my ears.

The luthiers you mentioned are phenomenal. Its just, these things start from 10k. I can see the fireballs coming from my wife's eyes.

Thanks

kavor
Posts: 59
Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2017 11:18 pm
Location: Boston MA

Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by kavor » Sat Aug 26, 2017 8:45 am

Monteverde wrote:
Fri Aug 25, 2017 11:02 am
kavor wrote:
Thu Aug 24, 2017 3:36 pm
Jack Douglas wrote:
Thu Aug 24, 2017 1:52 pm
Kavor,

You haven't indicated where you are located. There my be a classical guitar society or classically trained guitar instructor near you. Someone mentioned technique, posture, holding the instrument and to prevent injury to yourself and getting the most from your new guitar it's important that you learn as much as you can to make the best use of it and your ability.
Regarding a Guitar Society; it's a great venue to meet like minded musicians, listen to a variety of guitars and improve your knowledge about the classical guitar.
Also, there's nothing like attending a classical guitar concert in an intimate setting to really appreciate what the guitar,in the hands of a dedicated and trained musician, can sound like.
Good luck.
Jack
I live in Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Kavor
Hi Kavor --

If you are looking for a classical guitar instructor in the Lebanon/Hanover, New Hampshire, area, I'd strongly suggest you consider William Ghezzi. You can easily find his website (through which you can contact him) and YouTube videos with an internet search. His next concert performance will take place on Sunday, November 12, 2017, at Dartmouth as part of the Vaughan Recital Series.

Another upcoming event that might be of interest to you: the Los Angeles Guitar Quartet will be performing at the Hopkins Center for the Arts at Dartmouth on Wednesday, September 13, 2017.

Best regards,
Jon
I will certainly check out these performances. I went once to Los Angeles Guitar Quartet concert. Thanks for you suggestion for teacher. Do you know what is the approximate range serious classical people like Ghezzi charges? Thanks

Kavor

kavor
Posts: 59
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Location: Boston MA

Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by kavor » Sat Aug 26, 2017 8:53 am

Jacek A. Rochacki wrote:
Thu Aug 24, 2017 11:58 am
Let me repeat my congratulations on your guitar. You like it and it is most important, I think.

Perhaps with time you will notice that some pieces sound better on some guitars, and sound not so well on other guitars. Then you will chose your repertoire/number of pieces that in your perception sound the best on this mr. Turkowiak guitar. It will be interesting to know your impresions on comparison this very guitar with other guitars (not factory made) of a traditional construction when the same "test" piece is played - Romance Anonymous, some etudes by Tarrega or Sor.
Thanks Jacek. I was away from my Esteve guitar for about 15 days. I went back to it and realized its definitely Spanish:) Its not the easiest thing to play either. I can see what you are saying. I pulled this instrument of the sale and will instead sell my Cordoba C12. I think Esteve 12 is much much more powerful. I am working on a lot of classical pieces now. I think I will be able to experience this contrast between constructions you mentioned with these two instruments that I have, Turkowiak and Esteve. Thanks

Kavor

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Jacek A. Rochacki
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Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by Jacek A. Rochacki » Sat Aug 26, 2017 9:40 am

When I take to my hands the factory made or manufacture made guitar the first thing that I do is to have the action of strings set up to my liking. This usually means the visit to luthier who will carve from bone new nut and saddle for this new for me instrument. I think that I am not alone in belief that the first thing to do with a factory or manufacture guitar after purchase it brand new (or even second hand) is to have the action set by a luthier. In case of guitar previously used the first owner has probably had the guitar set by a good luthier, but it is not always so. I say this after reading that your Esteve is not the easiest thing to play...it is a pity that it seems that this guitar does not have a chance (yet) to show what she is able to do :)

And one more thing: I read at Mr. Turkowiak web pages that his guitars are described as luthier's instruments. So, regardless innovative construction etc. they should rather be compared to other luthier's instrument not to a guitar belonging to category of factory or manufacture instruments.
Antonio Picado, model 60, 2015, Cedar/IRW. Scale 640 mm.

kavor
Posts: 59
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Location: Boston MA

Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by kavor » Sat Aug 26, 2017 12:37 pm

Jacek A. Rochacki wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 9:40 am
When I take to my hands the factory made or manufacture made guitar the first thing that I do is to have the action of strings set up to my liking. This usually means the visit to luthier who will carve from bone new nut and saddle for this new for me instrument. I think that I am not alone in belief that the first thing to do with a factory or manufacture guitar after purchase it brand new (or even second hand) is to have the action set by a luthier. In case of guitar previously used the first owner has probably had the guitar set by a good luthier, but it is not always so. I say this after reading that your Esteve is not the easiest thing to play...it is a pity that it seems that this guitar does not have a chance (yet) to show what she is able to do :)

And one more thing: I read at Mr. Turkowiak web pages that his guitars are described as luthier's instruments. So, regardless innovative construction etc. they should rather be compared to other luthier's instrument not to a guitar belonging to category of factory or manufacture instruments.
Jacek, relax, I had my Esteve set up first thing I got it.

And I am not comparing these guitars(Turkowiak and Esteve) on quality... No worries.

Gary Macleod
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Location: Edinburgh

Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by Gary Macleod » Sat Aug 26, 2017 12:46 pm

I'm surprised you had to get your Esteve set up, any guitar I've had from them has been very easy to play straight out the box.

kavor
Posts: 59
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Location: Boston MA

Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by kavor » Sat Aug 26, 2017 1:00 pm

Gary Macleod wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 12:46 pm
I'm surprised you had to get your Esteve set up, any guitar I've had from them has been very easy to play straight out the box.
viewtopic.php?t=90974

Read this thread, I am not the only one saying that Model 12 is little hard to play.

Gary Macleod
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Location: Edinburgh

Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by Gary Macleod » Sat Aug 26, 2017 1:12 pm

kavor wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 1:00 pm
Gary Macleod wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 12:46 pm
I'm surprised you had to get your Esteve set up, any guitar I've had from them has been very easy to play straight out the box.
viewtopic.php?t=90974

Read this thread, I am not the only one saying that Model 12 is little hard to play.
Well yes, one other person said it was hard to play.
I've played 6 Adalid guitars and they were all really well set up.

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Jacek A. Rochacki
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Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by Jacek A. Rochacki » Sat Aug 26, 2017 1:23 pm

- kavor, thanks for the info that your Esteve was set up after purchase. So I am really curious why this guitar is still not the easiest thing to play; in my case setting of action results in best possible playability; the guitar plays as easy as proverbial butter and playing is smooth. Maybe it would make sense to check out your Esteve guitar by a luthier ? maybe there is something wrong with neck relief and/or other factors that (beside adjusting string action) influence playability ? or - as we read in posts that appeared in the meantime - it is just a "specific beauty" :) of this very model ?

I also had similar experience with certain guitar. It is a concert level luthier's instrument; sounds terrific, but is too hard for me to play, and it was impossible to improve playability by string height adjustment. Finally after 3 years of fight I sold the instrument and solved the problem in this not sophisticated way :)
Antonio Picado, model 60, 2015, Cedar/IRW. Scale 640 mm.

kavor
Posts: 59
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Location: Boston MA

Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by kavor » Sat Aug 26, 2017 1:47 pm

Gary Macleod wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 1:12 pm
kavor wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 1:00 pm
Gary Macleod wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 12:46 pm
I'm surprised you had to get your Esteve set up, any guitar I've had from them has been very easy to play straight out the box.
viewtopic.php?t=90974

Read this thread, I am not the only one saying that Model 12 is little hard to play.
Well yes, one other person said it was hard to play.
I've played 6 Adalid guitars and they were all really well set up.
Dude, your data is irrelevant. Bottomline, they are different adalid guitars than Model 12, right? So, we have 2 data points against 0 data points. Model 12 is a unique guitar as they all are. In my hands, compared to Cordoba C12 and some other guitar I have Model 12 seems little hard on fingers. In my opinion its much better guitar than Cordoba C12 but, just like this other person says, you gotta show it who's the boss.

kavor
Posts: 59
Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2017 11:18 pm
Location: Boston MA

Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by kavor » Sun Aug 27, 2017 1:43 pm

Jacek A. Rochacki wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 1:23 pm
- kavor, thanks for the info that your Esteve was set up after purchase. So I am really curious why this guitar is still not the easiest thing to play; in my case setting of action results in best possible playability; the guitar plays as easy as proverbial butter and playing is smooth. Maybe it would make sense to check out your Esteve guitar by a luthier ? maybe there is something wrong with neck relief and/or other factors that (beside adjusting string action) influence playability ? or - as we read in posts that appeared in the meantime - it is just a "specific beauty" :) of this very model ?

I also had similar experience with certain guitar. It is a concert level luthier's instrument; sounds terrific, but is too hard for me to play, and it was impossible to improve playability by string height adjustment. Finally after 3 years of fight I sold the instrument and solved the problem in this not sophisticated way :)
I am thinking of putting light gauge strings on my Esteve to improve playability. Do you have any experience with putting light gauge strings? Thanks

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Jacek A. Rochacki
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Re: Turkowiak Guitars

Post by Jacek A. Rochacki » Sun Aug 27, 2017 3:22 pm

Oh yes, I do. After many decades of playing many different strings - brands and tensions I become sworn aficionado of low/light tension all nylon strings. It has not been my idea, I simply followed advices by our Friend active here, Ramon Amira. We who play low tension strings are sometime named here "Ramon Amira low tension strings club".

The subject has been discussed and is described at our forum
viewtopic.php?t=95392
and in other threads
the strings recommended are often:
La Bella 2001 light tension
D'Addario J 43
Augustine in different combinations treble/bass; some of us are happy with Augustine Imperial/Black.

Original Jose Ramirez medium tension strings all nylon set also falls into category of not_so_high tension strings and many of us love them.
Antonio Picado, model 60, 2015, Cedar/IRW. Scale 640 mm.

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