1925 Herman Hauser on auction

Sharkbait
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1925 Herman Hauser on auction

Post by Sharkbait » Mon Jun 12, 2017 11:55 pm

On the UK guitar hyphen auctions site, there's a 1925 Herman Hauser coming up for sale very soon - 15 June, lot 345.

Blurb:

1925 Hermann Hauser guitar, labelled Herm. Hauser, Lautenmacher in Munchen, A.D. 1925, with open peg box, 20 fret ebony fingerboard on an ebonised heel adjustable neck, maple back and sides and spruce top, hard case

*This guitar has been in the same family since at least the early 1940s and is sold with two black and white photographs of the vendor’s father playing the instrument

Estimate £4500 – 6500 (Buyers Premium of 24% inclusive of VAT @20%)



I'm a little surprised at the estimate. Would have expected a Hauser I (yes? 1925 should be Hauser I not II?) to cost more, so I'd love it if others with more experience could chime in on what a realistic/likely price would be.

I'm not looking to buy but if anyone else is, go right ahead. This is just a public service announcement.

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petermc61
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Re: 1925 Herman Hauser on auction

Post by petermc61 » Tue Jun 13, 2017 12:28 am

I don't think they auction many Hauser 1 guitars. If it's playable I'd expect it to sell for at least 10 times that estimate.

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petermc61
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Re: 1925 Herman Hauser on auction

Post by petermc61 » Tue Jun 13, 2017 12:42 am

Changed my mind. Maple with adjustable neck suggests a Viennese model or similar. Estimate is probably reasonable. His Spanish guitars started coming to the fore in the late '20s (Segovia's first was 1928).

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Re: 1925 Herman Hauser on auction

Post by Philosopherguy » Tue Jun 13, 2017 1:40 am

There is that Sicca's video of Marcin Dylla playing a beautiful 1924 Hauser though that looks very spanish. So, Hauser must have been making spanish based instruments earlier than the late 1920's. One of the members here actually told me he once had a potential opportunity to buy the guitar that Dylla is playing in that video.

But, this guitar that is being auctioned does look like the Viennese model. Too bad! For that estimate I would have been interested in a spanish model!

Martin
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2013 Ramirez 130 Anos - Spruce
2013 Ramirez 4NE - Cedar
1998 Dean Harrington - Spruce
1977 Kuniharu Nobe - Spruce
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petermc61
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Re: 1925 Herman Hauser on auction

Post by petermc61 » Tue Jun 13, 2017 3:48 am

Philosopherguy wrote:
Tue Jun 13, 2017 1:40 am
There is that Sicca's video of Marcin Dylla playing a beautiful 1924 Hauser though that looks very spanish. So, Hauser must have been making spanish based instruments earlier than the late 1920's. One of the members here actually told me he once had a potential opportunity to buy the guitar that Dylla is playing in that video.

But, this guitar that is being auctioned does look like the Viennese model. Too bad! For that estimate I would have been interested in a spanish model!

Martin
Hi Martin

What you say is certainly correct. His work on a Spanish guitars started earlier, I seem to recall around 1920 but I can't recall where I heard this. I think he gradually introduced Spanish build as I have seen posts of samples of his guitars from that time that had aspects of both German and Spanish design.

When I said they were coming to the fore by the late 20s I meant that he was starting to achieve the sound he would become famous for, and was starting to get the recognition for it.

I can add to your list of people who were interested in that 1924 Hauser. I was in serious discussions about acquiring it also. I did not proceed for two reasons - a bit of boxiness to the midrange (which seemed to disappear in his later Spanish guitars) and the fact that the action was fixed by applying a thicker fretboard that was not cut uniformly thick over its length. In consultation with Hermann Hauser III he indicated that it would be better served by a reset of the neck ie pull it apart, fix the geometry issues permanently and put it back together again. Unfortunately the cost to that was about the same as getting a new Hauser III (about €15,000, since he estimated to time and work the same as building a new guitar). In retrospect I think I would have done that but the boxiness in the midrange just didn't appeal. Instead, I am waiting to win the lottery so I can buy a mint 30s-40s version......

Peter

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Re: 1925 Herman Hauser on auction

Post by gjo » Tue Jun 13, 2017 5:24 am

Hauser I built his first "spanish" guitars in summer 1924 after his first meeting with Segovia in spring 1924. The 1924 meeting that Segovia described in 1954 was already the second meeting in which Hauser presented his "spanish" guitars based on Segovia's 1912 M. Ramírez. The 1924 at Sicca's was one of the very first "spanish" Hausers, but in fact it was a german constructed guitar in spanish disguise.

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Re: 1925 Herman Hauser on auction

Post by Philosopherguy » Wed Jun 14, 2017 3:40 am

petermc61 wrote:
Tue Jun 13, 2017 3:48 am
Instead, I am waiting to win the lottery so I can buy a mint 30s-40s version......
Hey! There is a coincidence! I am waiting on the same lottery! Good thing we live in different countries or we might be in competition for it! When we both win the lottery, I'm likely going to be in the market for a Manuel Ramirez though. So we might be safe from competition on the guitar front!

I heard that 1924 Hauser from Sicca's needed some work(unless its been repaired since). I actually love the sound of that guitar though. Then again, I haven't heard it in person. Marcin Dylla can likely make most guitars shine. I just love that "old world" tone that seems to emanate from it! To me, a guitar should sound like a guitar; not a piano and not a canon of an instrument. The guitar is intimate and it's music flows from the gentle touch of the human body in a fluid motion. That is the romance that is in the playing of the guitar; it is exemplified in the simple instruments with that classic sound. Otherwise we might as well all throw our guitars away and play an instrument that can do more for us (ie. an electronic synthesizer or some computer software).

Anyways... we still all search for the Grail! Apparently this auction is not it! hahaha..

Martin
*************************************************************
2013 Ramirez 130 Anos - Spruce
2013 Ramirez 4NE - Cedar
1998 Dean Harrington - Spruce
1977 Kuniharu Nobe - Spruce
1971 Yamaha GC3 - Spruce

Sharkbait
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Re: 1925 Herman Hauser on auction

Post by Sharkbait » Wed Jun 14, 2017 6:07 am

Thanks Peter and Martin for your comments and for sharing your knowledge. It's what I love about this forum.

I didn't even realise that Hauser built different guitars (the Viennese model) from what he became famous for (Spanish-based). Could you please explain a little more about what the difference is? Is it in the bracing? Thickness of the soundboard? How do the sounds differ?

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petermc61
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Re: 1925 Herman Hauser on auction

Post by petermc61 » Wed Jun 14, 2017 8:35 am

Hauser 1 built quite a few different instruments including zithers and lutes as well as guitars. Frankly, I can't tell you about the construction differences between the German and Spanish schools 100-150 years ago. I am sure some of our luthiers here will have a far better idea.

The Viennese model sounds to me ears like a sonic progression from the romantic guitars. They have more midrange and treble and less bass weight compared to modern guitars and less sustain. They are good for works of Sor, Carulli, Regondi et al if you are chasing the 'original sound'. I really can't imagine them playing 20th Century Spanish or Latin pieces.

Peter

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Re: 1925 Herman Hauser on auction

Post by simonm » Wed Jun 14, 2017 9:22 am

Germany construction most likely means that the neck is slid into the body in a slot similar to some bolt on necks today. For adjustable versions the Rubner tuner company still makes the necessary bolt mechanism.

It is not a mortice and tenon type slot - it is straight sided. I have heard a violin neck is similar but I have never seen a deconstructed violin next so I can't say for sure.

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Michael.N.
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Re: 1925 Herman Hauser on auction

Post by Michael.N. » Wed Jun 14, 2017 11:59 am

It is known as a mortice joint, both for guitars of the period and for violins. It's not quite the same as the dovetail joint that is found on some steel string guitars.
The largest difference is the soundboard. Usually it is built a bit heavier than Spanish models, with ladder rather than fan bracing. Also built flat rather than domed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m61tKJETBNE
Historicalguitars.

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