Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

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Michael.N.
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Michael.N. » Sun Oct 15, 2017 4:45 pm

Why?
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Beowulf
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Beowulf » Sun Oct 15, 2017 7:03 pm

I do not know...it appeared possible to me that the original poor repair may have had square ends or left shards of wood that required removal in order to fit a splint securely to the existing soundboard.. Only Andrea Tacchi would know for sure.
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Michael.N.
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Michael.N. » Sun Oct 15, 2017 8:25 pm

You obviously aren't familiar with splint techniques. We'll leave it at that.
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Beowulf
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Beowulf » Mon Oct 16, 2017 1:34 am

Michael.N. wrote:
Sun Oct 15, 2017 8:25 pm
You obviously aren't familiar with splint techniques. We'll leave it at that.
No, not at all. Would you be so kind as to explain? I take it that feathering the ends of a splint is always possible?
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Michael.N.
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Michael.N. » Mon Oct 16, 2017 6:51 am

Yes. I see absolutely nothing that precludes it. Over 35 years ago I formally trained in guitar making and violin repair. I can't say that I've ever seen a splint done quite in that manner, violin or guitar. It's just not standard practice, for obvious reasons. I'm not stating that it's poorly executed, just that it's an odd way to finish the end of a splint, obviously done from a router cutter.
Here's an example of what the very best restorers are capable of but you would need an instrument worth a very large amount of money to even justify spending on the restoration. It doesn't come cheap but you can understand why. They don't just repair, they make the repair disappear.
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Beowulf
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Beowulf » Mon Oct 16, 2017 2:37 pm

Michael.N. wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 6:51 am
Yes. I see absolutely nothing that precludes it. Over 35 years ago I formally trained in guitar making and violin repair. I can't say that I've ever seen a splint done quite in that manner, violin or guitar. It's just not standard practice, for obvious reasons. I'm not stating that it's poorly executed, just that it's an odd way to finish the end of a splint, obviously done from a router cutter.
Here's an example of what the very best restorers are capable of but you would need an instrument worth a very large amount of money to even justify spending on the restoration. It doesn't come cheap but you can understand why. They don't just repair, they make the repair disappear.
Well now...that is a beautiful restoration! Thanks for the information. :merci: It does seem very unusual that an accomplished luthier would use an "odd" method to finish a splint end.
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Michael.N.
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Re: Yes Virginia, there is new life for badly damaged guitars!

Post by Michael.N. » Mon Oct 16, 2017 3:17 pm

There are luthiers who make, some who repair, some who do both and some who restore as a speciality. That violin is definitely the latter.
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