Weight of a Classical Guitar

bobbyboy
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Weight of a Classical Guitar

Post by bobbyboy » Thu Oct 19, 2017 10:12 pm

Hi,
What do you think is the best weight of a classical guitar. I played a couple recently
and they were between 3.6 &3.8 pounds. Felt very heavy.
I know that construction and material have some relationship to the weight.
Thanks,
BB

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guitarseller345645
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Re: Weight of a Classical Guitar

Post by guitarseller345645 » Fri Oct 20, 2017 12:11 am

I have heard that light guitars are good because they are responsive, while heavy guitars are good because they are more resonant.

Some say all solid guitars are heavy, others say laminate guitars are heavy because of all the glue.

A bit confusing to me.
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dta721
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Re: Weight of a Classical Guitar

Post by dta721 » Fri Oct 20, 2017 2:21 am

guitarseller345645 wrote:
Fri Oct 20, 2017 12:11 am
... Some say all solid guitars are heavy, others say laminate guitars are heavy because of all the glue.

A bit confusing to me.
I have one (all) laminated and one solid wood classical guitar, so my experience in terms of weight is based on these two. The laminated one feel lighter, solid wood heavier. I used a crude way to quantify the weight difference, it may not be accurate but certainly gives an quantitative idea, when weighing myself with each guitar (then subtracting my body weight). Laminated: about 3.2 lbs; solid wood: 3.8 lbs.

In terms of sound, there is no comparison! :)

simonm
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Re: Weight of a Classical Guitar

Post by simonm » Fri Oct 20, 2017 10:08 am

The best weight is the weight of the guitar you like best. Everybody will have their own favorite.

All the weights mentioned are pretty "normal" although not on the light end of the scale. Most people express the weight of guitars in grammes/kilogrammes not decimal pounds.

Here is a thread where people has list the weights of their guitars. viewtopic.php?f=11&t=60513

Here is your own thread on the same topic from last year. viewtopic.php?f=107&t=103262 some very good answers there too.

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souldier
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Re: Weight of a Classical Guitar

Post by souldier » Fri Oct 20, 2017 10:39 am

Weight really doesn't determine anything about sound and there is no ideal weight to look for IMHO. I often find that classical guitarists nit pick so many little details like what species of spruce is being used, how is it constructed, what bracing pattern does it have, what country is it made in, what is the head stock veneer, what was the phase of the moon when it was completed, etc. In the end there are too many parts that collectively come together. If we try to single out factors like the weight, species of wood, etc., it can prevent us from really judging the guitar without bias. With that said, I've played mammoth heavy guitars, light guitars, and everything in between, and I've concluded it doesn't really matter. I find that rosewood back and sides, laminated sides, etc. tend to make the guitar heavier, but not worse or less responsive. When an experienced luthier changes the design to make a guitar lighter or heavier, it is usually intentionally and for the purpose of improving the overall sound. Some luthiers make light guitars, some make heavier, but you can have amazing guitars on both ends of the spectrum and the end result depends on a whole host of other factors.
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zavaletas
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Re: Weight of a Classical Guitar

Post by zavaletas » Tue Oct 24, 2017 2:21 pm

souldier wrote:
Fri Oct 20, 2017 10:39 am
Weight really doesn't determine anything about sound ... When an experienced luthier changes the design to make a guitar lighter or heavier, it is usually intentionally and for the purpose of improving the overall sound. Some luthiers make light guitars, some make heavier, but you can have amazing guitars on both ends of the spectrum and the end result depends on a whole host of other factors.
I second this, and would add... That the theory is different behind heavy and light instruments. Heavy back and sides, are meant to be reflective, and push the sound through the top, and improve volume and projection. Smallman's guitar are an example of this. Extremely heavy. They have a very thin top. The light construction works under the philosophy that all parts of the guitar contribute something to the sound-- that vibrations cycle through the whole instrument. On a personal note, the lighter guitar is more user friendly-- easier to balance. Early Madrid guitar such as those of Manuel Ramirez were built this way-- and give you a guitar that feels alive in your hands.
James, Zavaleta's La Casa de Guitarras

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