Early 1900’s parlor style guitar origins?

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crabolsky
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Re: Early 1900’s parlor style guitar origins?

Post by crabolsky » Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:13 am

I've updated with embedded photos and have recieved a couple additional from the seller. Cant say I am really thrilled with the look of the wood on the back. Looks like it maybe be an all pine body guitar? Unfortunately the sound hole photo also shows there maybe some cracks in the soundboard that weren't described in the listing. Pick up is scheduled for this Sunday, so we'll see how it goes...

Any other thoughts would be appreciated


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Michael.N.
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Re: Early 1900’s parlor style guitar origins?

Post by Michael.N. » Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:45 pm

Back could be plain birch or plain maple. It looks like the soundboard has a bit of woodworm damage, possibly long gone. Not sure about that bridge, it may well be a later replacement. It's a relatively low grade guitar. With work it may make a decent player but it's a question of whether you want to put in the money. In economic terms it's marginal whether it is viable, certainly in terms of resale. It's the same with a lot of these German trade guitars, it's all about condition, neck angle, set up etc. as to whether they are worth buying. Many seem to buy blind without having any idea how much work is required to get them into full playing condition.
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andreas777
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Re: Early 1900’s parlor style guitar origins?

Post by andreas777 » Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:57 pm

Michael.N. wrote:
Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:45 pm
It's a relatively low grade guitar.
In my opinion the guitar is a low level factory guitar. The top looks ok, the back seems to be cheap plywood, the fret board might not be the best, and the frets and tuners must be replaced if you really want to play on it. The only reason to buy this guitar in my view is to use it as decoration on the wall.
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crabolsky
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Re: Early 1900’s parlor style guitar origins?

Post by crabolsky » Thu Jan 04, 2018 11:34 pm

andreas777 wrote:
Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:57 pm
Michael.N. wrote:
Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:45 pm
It's a relatively low grade guitar.
The only reason to buy this guitar in my view is to use it as decoration on the wall.
:lol: Well you might be right there... I am less than convinced it’s worth the effort after seeing these last photos. After doing more research on these guitars, I now see what you were talking about with the design choices made with this guitar Michael. The bridge does look out of place, the headstock and now the wood choice for the back. Many thanks for your input guys.
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crabolsky
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Re: Early 1900’s parlor style guitar origins?

Post by crabolsky » Sun Jan 07, 2018 11:18 am

Well I finally got to see the guitar in person this afternoon and it is even more worse for wear than I originally thought. 3 cracks in the top and 1 in the back. The wood worm damage you spotted Michael is definitely present but appears to be fairly limited. I passed on the purchase... he also offered to give it to me at half agreed upon price (about $120 usd) and I still passed.

It was a tiny little thing that played well and quite loud on the strings I brought into tune. If it was in better condition I would have grabbed it!

Photos for posterity.

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Michael.N.
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Re: Early 1900’s parlor style guitar origins?

Post by Michael.N. » Sun Jan 07, 2018 12:17 pm

It has zero commercial value. These types of guitars really need to be in very good condition with very little repair work required for them to be a viable option. I'd pass on it even if I was offered $120 to take it off someones hands - well I'd take it along with the $120 but sadly the guitar would end up in my log burner. As a quick appraisal I'd have to charge something like $1,000 to get it up to spec. The guitar would then have a realistic commercial value of around $200 to $300 (it would still take time to sell). That tells you everything that you need to know.
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crabolsky
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Re: Early 1900’s parlor style guitar origins?

Post by crabolsky » Sun Jan 07, 2018 12:53 pm

That is a perfectly succinct appraisal Michael. Thank you for holding my hand through this process or shall I say this near miss :)
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