Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Construction and repair of Classical Guitar and related instruments
Michael McBride
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Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by Michael McBride » Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:52 am

Hi,
I realize this thread is a year old but I was hoping I could jump in and get a question answered. Is this foaming the result of Gorilla Glue and can I trim it off with a sharp blade? Here's a picture:
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1967 Manuel Contreras
Cordoba C5-CE
Lucida Artista
J. Navarro

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Michael.N.
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Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by Michael.N. » Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:11 pm

It's alive!
Historicalguitars.

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riemsesy
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Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by riemsesy » Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:25 pm

wow.. 3 twists in the E6 string
Best regards,
Richard Frank

johnparchem
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Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by johnparchem » Sat Jan 14, 2017 5:02 pm

Gorilla glue does do that in the open. I personally use a sharp chisel sliding it under hardened squeeze out. I never tried this with Gorilla glue. Gorilla glue is pretty resistant to any solvent.

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Steve Ganz
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Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by Steve Ganz » Sun Jan 15, 2017 6:57 am

Chessmonkey wrote:Hi,
I realize this thread is a year old but I was hoping I could jump in and get a question answered. Is this foaming the result of Gorilla Glue and can I trim it off with a sharp blade? Here's a picture:
Yes
and
yes.
Go slowly.
Steve

Peter_T
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Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by Peter_T » Wed Jan 18, 2017 3:56 am

Chessmonkey wrote:Hi,
I realize this thread is a year old but I was hoping I could jump in and get a question answered. Is this foaming the result of Gorilla Glue and can I trim it off with a sharp blade? Here's a picture:

Please please clarify what's happening here. Is this yours? Did you glue a bridge with the strings still attached?


To answer your actual question, yes that is the normal foaming result of Gorilla Glue's normal curing/drying process.

Michael McBride
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Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by Michael McBride » Wed Feb 01, 2017 7:43 am

Peter_T wrote:
Chessmonkey wrote:Hi,
I realize this thread is a year old but I was hoping I could jump in and get a question answered. Is this foaming the result of Gorilla Glue and can I trim it off with a sharp blade? Here's a picture:

Please please clarify what's happening here. Is this yours? Did you glue a bridge with the strings still attached?


To answer your actual question, yes that is the normal foaming result of Gorilla Glue's normal curing/drying process.
Ha! No, it's not mine. I think the owner tried to fix it himself with household glue, though he won't admit to it. I've just been asked it can be fixed and I've never seen glue do that. Before I said yes I figured I'd better ask some experts. I figured it couldn't be hide glue, or any normal guitar glue for that matter. Thanks Peter!
1967 Manuel Contreras
Cordoba C5-CE
Lucida Artista
J. Navarro

Michael McBride
Amateur luthier
Posts: 25
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:44 am

Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by Michael McBride » Wed Feb 01, 2017 7:44 am

Steve Ganz wrote:
Chessmonkey wrote:Hi,
I realize this thread is a year old but I was hoping I could jump in and get a question answered. Is this foaming the result of Gorilla Glue and can I trim it off with a sharp blade? Here's a picture:
Yes
and
yes.
Go slowly.
That's good advice for some many things. Thanks Steve!
1967 Manuel Contreras
Cordoba C5-CE
Lucida Artista
J. Navarro

Michael McBride
Amateur luthier
Posts: 25
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:44 am

Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by Michael McBride » Wed Feb 01, 2017 7:45 am

johnparchem wrote:Gorilla glue does do that in the open. I personally use a sharp chisel sliding it under hardened squeeze out. I never tried this with Gorilla glue. Gorilla glue is pretty resistant to any solvent.
How about to heat? I'm afraid it'll pull wood if it isn't softened. Thanks John!
1967 Manuel Contreras
Cordoba C5-CE
Lucida Artista
J. Navarro

Michael McBride
Amateur luthier
Posts: 25
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:44 am

Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by Michael McBride » Wed Feb 01, 2017 7:47 am

riemsesy wrote:wow.. 3 twists in the E6 string
Right?! I couldn't believe it when I saw it. And do you see the little loop-d-loop knots at the ends. This guitar owner really didn't want any slippage! :lol:
1967 Manuel Contreras
Cordoba C5-CE
Lucida Artista
J. Navarro

Michael McBride
Amateur luthier
Posts: 25
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:44 am

Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by Michael McBride » Wed Feb 01, 2017 7:48 am

Michael.N. wrote:It's alive!
Reminds me of The Blob! I just dated myself. 8)
1967 Manuel Contreras
Cordoba C5-CE
Lucida Artista
J. Navarro

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riemsesy
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Location: Netherlands

Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by riemsesy » Fri Feb 03, 2017 12:04 am

Michael McBride wrote:
riemsesy wrote:wow.. 3 twists in the E6 string
Right?! I couldn't believe it when I saw it. And do you see the little loop-d-loop knots at the ends. This guitar owner really didn't want any slippage! :lol:
true.. imagine a slippage would dent the soundboard. :D That would ruin it
Best regards,
Richard Frank

Jim Frieson
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Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by Jim Frieson » Fri Feb 03, 2017 9:00 am

Formaldehyde has now become more illegal , but it has long industrial application . It hardens proteins .
With hide glue , with two matching parts ready to glue , one can :
Apply a watered down solution of formalin to one surface , and hide glue to the other surface .
Put the two together and press . You have enough time to rub once or twice , a few seconds .
I never used it on guitars , but I used it on furniture ; I could make a skirt for a D Table in about 20 minutes .
A man from the construction industry told me exterior plywood was laminated with animal glue and formaldehyde , in a large press under heat .
I made a guitar out of an old Thomas Chickering piano lid veneered in excellent Brasil rosewood ; I soaked in the bathtub to get the veneer off ;
but no amount of soaking or application of heat loosened the veneer at all , and vinegar had no effect ; I had to bandsaw it off . I was always curious about that .

Michael McBride
Amateur luthier
Posts: 25
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Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by Michael McBride » Sat Feb 04, 2017 4:01 am

Jim Frieson wrote:Formaldehyde has now become more illegal , but it has long industrial application . It hardens proteins .
With hide glue , with two matching parts ready to glue , one can :
Apply a watered down solution of formalin to one surface , and hide glue to the other surface .
Put the two together and press . You have enough time to rub once or twice , a few seconds .
I never used it on guitars , but I used it on furniture ; I could make a skirt for a D Table in about 20 minutes .
A man from the construction industry told me exterior plywood was laminated with animal glue and formaldehyde , in a large press under heat .
I made a guitar out of an old Thomas Chickering piano lid veneered in excellent Brasil rosewood ; I soaked in the bathtub to get the veneer off ;
but no amount of soaking or application of heat loosened the veneer at all , and vinegar had no effect ; I had to bandsaw it off . I was always curious about that .
Certain guitar manufacturers are guilty of the same. Yamaha, for example, attaches its bridges directly onto the polyurethane finish with what must be a poly glue because it's impervious to heat, water, and chemicals. I nearly destroyed two Yamaha guitar tops before realizing this. It's the bane of my repair business because so many low-end Yamahas come out of the factory with a sheet-of-paper-sized gap between the bridge and the top. They're nearly never totally flush. Even Yamaha guitars 20-30 years old have the same problem. :x
1967 Manuel Contreras
Cordoba C5-CE
Lucida Artista
J. Navarro

Jim Frieson
Posts: 470
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 12:48 pm

Re: Tough bridge removal -- what glue was it?

Post by Jim Frieson » Sat Feb 18, 2017 7:04 pm

Michael McBride wrote:
Jim Frieson wrote:Formaldehyde has now become more illegal , but it has long industrial application . It hardens proteins .
With hide glue , with two matching parts ready to glue , one can :
Apply a watered down solution of formalin to one surface , and hide glue to the other surface .
Put the two together and press . You have enough time to rub once or twice , a few seconds .
I never used it on guitars , but I used it on furniture ; I could make a skirt for a D Table in about 20 minutes .
A man from the construction industry told me exterior plywood was laminated with animal glue and formaldehyde , in a large press under heat .
I made a guitar out of an old Thomas Chickering piano lid veneered in excellent Brasil rosewood ; I soaked in the bathtub to get the veneer off ;
but no amount of soaking or application of heat loosened the veneer at all , and vinegar had no effect ; I had to bandsaw it off . I was always curious about that .
Certain guitar manufacturers are guilty of the same. Yamaha, for example, attaches its bridges directly onto the polyurethane finish with what must be a poly glue because it's impervious to heat, water, and chemicals. I nearly destroyed two Yamaha guitar tops before realizing this. It's the bane of my repair business because so many low-end Yamahas come out of the factory with a sheet-of-paper-sized gap between the bridge and the top. They're nearly never totally flush. Even Yamaha guitars 20-30 years old have the same problem. :x
Early Japanese guitars were finished in polyester . The stuff turns yellow with time and accounts for the coloration of such old guitars .
Now urethane has replaced it .
Two part urethane is pretty strong stuff .I asked a finish tech rep " What would you say about 2 part urethane over shellac as a base ? "
" Kind of like putting a sheet of glass on a pillow " he said .
I have seen flamenco guitars with the tap plate stuck onto the finish and then a finish sprayed on top of that . The finish as tough as the mylar tap plate .

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