1940 Hauser

Construction and repair of Classical Guitar and related instruments
Aaron Green
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by Aaron Green » Wed Jan 11, 2017 10:44 pm

Dave M wrote:Yes now I was going to say that.

The builder has got the node line right out near the edge of the top. This means that there is more top surface radiating sound in the monopole mode, and less of the out of phase area thus giving greater volume. Similar testing on my builds puts the node line a good 25/30 mm in from the top/ side joint. I wonder how he achieved that. Even more pronounced in the cross dipole mode.

Do we know what sort of linings he used at the top side joint?

Did you have the bridge on when you ran the dipole? I never do but it will make the center of the top rather stiffer across the grain which will affect how that mode looks IMO.

The pattern is rather wide, meaning to me that he put a ton of glitter on there and that it settled where the top isn't vibrating. I don't think there's much you can say about the guitar from those two photos but I certainly have heard good things about this builder.
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Guitarists unite to help Anthony Weller. PM me to ask how you may do so as well.

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SeanWinkler
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by SeanWinkler » Wed Jan 11, 2017 11:03 pm

Grooveman JS wrote:
SeanWinkler wrote:
Grooveman JS wrote:I've been researching luthier bios, guitars & also listening to as many videos & sound clips (good quality ones).....in preparation for my next purchase..... Hausers & Torres: I like them both; I'd be hard pressed to chose between the 2......but Luthier Frtiz Ober said in some magazine that a guitar sound some where in between Torres & a Hauser is Ideal. I agree totally :bravo:
You should talk to Aaron Green about his smaller-bodied Romanillos/Torres/Hauser inspired guitar. I opted for this over his larger plantilla and I'm thrilled with the results. If you're ever in the Boston area, feel free to get in touch, and definitely schedule a visit with Aaron!
Hi Sean
I did do some research on his website; much of the time listening to that "Bouchet" guitar.....after listening to so many clips, my ears are attuned to Torres/Hauser/Bouchet.....my fave CG sounds in that order. Thanks for the lead on Aaron G; that's definitely an option.....yesssss i do like the smaller plantilla guitars ......do you have some videos or sound clips of his Torres or Hauser guitars? :?:
Looks like Aaron posted a link to Frank playing one of the earlier examples of this style. I don't have any videos or audio of my guitar specifically.

There are a few things you won't get from online research: the feel of the guitar in your hands, the sound of the guitar from the player's perspective. I'm a big fan of the slightly smaller plantilla, and I played a 1972 Papazian for years. Aaron's guitar is dimensionally very similar, but the neck is even more comfortable (which is saying a lot if you have ever tried a Papazian). I still have the trusty P, but it has been quite illuminating to realize what has been lacking all these years. That's also saying a lot considering the lovely tone that a vintage Papazian can produce. Aaron's guitar has a depth, balance, and refinement that is just head and shoulders above anything else I've played.
Remember Anthony Weller, please help. Contact myself or Aaron Green for details.

astro64
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by astro64 » Wed Jan 11, 2017 11:16 pm

Dave M wrote:Yes now I was going to say that.

The builder has got the node line right out near the edge of the top. This means that there is more top surface radiating sound in the monopole mode, and less of the out of phase area thus giving greater volume. Similar testing on my builds puts the node line a good 25/30 mm in from the top/ side joint. I wonder how he achieved that. Even more pronounced in the cross dipole mode.

Do we know what sort of linings he used at the top side joint?
I think we have to be careful with that interpretation because the top is very domed and so the tea leaves will slide all the way down to the side.

Grooveman JS
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by Grooveman JS » Thu Jan 12, 2017 3:11 am

gjo wrote:
Portland Bill wrote:... is it a later addition to fix a high action ? ... i
Yes it is.

In this 1940 I plated the fingerboard to correct a high action and also to correct the intonation. IIRC it was done as well by Gary Southwell with the 1940 ex-Rose Augustine that Bream played.

Hello there........gjo.....are you the German Luthier Gerhard Oldiges? :D :D :D I've been listening to sound clips, videos & researching your guitars ....1 Torres model, another regular Hauser model....or should I say regular Oldiges model :) :)
Last edited by Grooveman JS on Thu Jan 12, 2017 3:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Grooveman JS
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by Grooveman JS » Thu Jan 12, 2017 3:18 am

Aaron Green wrote:
Grooveman JS wrote:
SeanWinkler wrote:
You should talk to Aaron Green about his smaller-bodied Romanillos/Torres/Hauser inspired guitar. I opted for this over his larger plantilla and I'm thrilled with the results. If you're ever in the Boston area, feel free to get in touch, and definitely schedule a visit with Aaron!
Hi Sean
I did do some research on his website; much of the time listening to that "Bouchet" guitar.....after listening to so many clips, my ears are attuned to Torres/Hauser/Bouchet.....my fave CG sounds in that order. Thanks for the lead on Aaron G; that's definitely an option.....yesssss i do like the smaller plantilla guitars ......do you have some videos or sound clips of his Torres or Hauser guitars? :?:
Thank you Sean!

Please see this video which is what I call my " Romanillos inspired" model; partially because "Llobet model Hauser inspired model" is way too cumbersome. Romanillos is very much part of that lineage and as such a Romanillos guitar is his own thing and at the same time his expression and integration of designs and concepts directly attributed to Hauser and Torres. I like to think of my own evolution in the same manner and to that end, the real truth is this model is a smaller bodied Aaron Green.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYIejZVCVaw

If you are in the market for a real Hauser I, I have this guitar and another one the way that is pretty damn mint. Far more $ than one of mine but for those who can and care...feel free to give me a call.:)

Link to copyright material removed; search YouTube for Frank Wallace Cancion by Mompou
Hello Aaron that's a very nice sounding guitar....looks swell too.....I don't have the $$ for a real Torres/Hauser or Bouchet; I think skilled master luthiers who can build a very close copy is good enough for me. I like what Fritz Ober said about having a sound that straddles between a Torres & Hauser being the ideal & Yesss.....i like smaller bodied CGs :bravo:
Masaki Sakurai MA-RF
Antonio Picado Concierto DT

Grooveman JS
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by Grooveman JS » Thu Jan 12, 2017 3:31 am

SeanWinkler wrote:
Grooveman JS wrote:
SeanWinkler wrote:
You should talk to Aaron Green about his smaller-bodied Romanillos/Torres/Hauser inspired guitar. I opted for this over his larger plantilla and I'm thrilled with the results. If you're ever in the Boston area, feel free to get in touch, and definitely schedule a visit with Aaron!
Hi Sean
I did do some research on his website; much of the time listening to that "Bouchet" guitar.....after listening to so many clips, my ears are attuned to Torres/Hauser/Bouchet.....my fave CG sounds in that order. Thanks for the lead on Aaron G; that's definitely an option.....yesssss i do like the smaller plantilla guitars ......do you have some videos or sound clips of his Torres or Hauser guitars? :?:
Looks like Aaron posted a link to Frank playing one of the earlier examples of this style. I don't have any videos or audio of my guitar specifically.

There are a few things you won't get from online research: the feel of the guitar in your hands, the sound of the guitar from the player's perspective. I'm a big fan of the slightly smaller plantilla, and I played a 1972 Papazian for years. Aaron's guitar is dimensionally very similar, but the neck is even more comfortable (which is saying a lot if you have ever tried a Papazian). I still have the trusty P, but it has been quite illuminating to realize what has been lacking all these years. That's also saying a lot considering the lovely tone that a vintage Papazian can produce. Aaron's guitar has a depth, balance, and refinement that is just head and shoulders above anything else I've played.
You're right Sean .....about no amount of research compares to having the guitar on hand; playing & hearing for oneself.....the online thing is just a preliminary research find out as much as possible; sort of like a rough idea what I'm looking for...kind of like a mental shortlist..... i plan to make trips to Japan & the US (LA most likely) to go try some guitars.......if I've to spent considerable $$ on this guitar, I'll want to take my time playing/feeling & hearing as many guitars as possible. I've not played or heard a Papazian before.....I've heard some of Aaron's guitars but that clip that he put up is my fave; nice sounding guitar; looks swell too :bravo:
Masaki Sakurai MA-RF
Antonio Picado Concierto DT

Portland Bill
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by Portland Bill » Thu Jan 12, 2017 6:51 am

Is the top domed through age or was it built that way, as the instrument has suffered a high action which has required attention ?

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Trevor Gore
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by Trevor Gore » Thu Jan 12, 2017 7:46 am

Dave M wrote:The builder has got the node line right out near the edge of the top....
That's because it's the T(1,1)1 (main air mode) that's shown, not the T(1,1)2. It about where you'd expect to see the node line for a T(1,1)1. The momentum equilibrium is is between the top and out-of-phase back (i.e. a "breathing" mode). The T(1, 1)2 (main top mode) is the one that is effectively a concentric dipole, with the area outside the node line out of phase with the area within.

With the T(2,1) (cross dipole), momentum equilibrium is due to the two out-of-phase motions of the top panel and the motion normally goes out pretty close to the edge.
Trevor Gore: Classical Guitar Design and Build

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petermc61
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by petermc61 » Thu Jan 12, 2017 8:06 am

Trevor Gore wrote:
Dave M wrote:The builder has got the node line right out near the edge of the top....
That's because it's the T(1,1)1 (main air mode) that's shown, not the T(1,1)2. It about where you'd expect to see the node line for a T(1,1)1. The momentum equilibrium is is between the top and out-of-phase back (i.e. a "breathing" mode). The T(1, 1)2 (main top mode) is the one that is effectively a concentric dipole, with the area outside the node line out of phase with the area within.

With the T(2,1) (cross dipole), momentum equilibrium is due to the two out-of-phase motions of the top panel and the motion normally goes out pretty close to the edge.
Yes, of course. I couldn't have explained it more precisely myself! :shock:

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Trevor Gore
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by Trevor Gore » Thu Jan 12, 2017 9:39 am

pp 1-81 to 1-88 Peter (and Dave), if you want the unabridged version! :D
Trevor Gore: Classical Guitar Design and Build

Aaron Green
Luthier
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Location: Boston

Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by Aaron Green » Thu Jan 12, 2017 1:06 pm

Trevor Gore wrote:
Dave M wrote:The builder has got the node line right out near the edge of the top....
That's because it's the T(1,1)1 (main air mode) that's shown, not the T(1,1)2. It about where you'd expect to see the node line for a T(1,1)1. The momentum equilibrium is is between the top and out-of-phase back (i.e. a "breathing" mode). The T(1, 1)2 (main top mode) is the one that is effectively a concentric dipole, with the area outside the node line out of phase with the area within.

With the T(2,1) (cross dipole), momentum equilibrium is due to the two out-of-phase motions of the top panel and the motion normally goes out pretty close to the edge.
There are two photos, the first is the "ring" mode and the second appears to me to be the dipole. Is that not the case?
Aaron Green, Luthier

Guitarists unite to help Anthony Weller. PM me to ask how you may do so as well.

gjo
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by gjo » Thu Jan 12, 2017 3:54 pm

Portland Bill wrote:Is the top domed through age or was it built that way, as the instrument has suffered a high action which has required attention ?
The action was not excessively high and the top was quite stable with the original doming or arching, so I would say that it was built this way.

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Guitar-ded
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by Guitar-ded » Thu Jan 12, 2017 7:12 pm

Stephen Kenyon wrote:That's the guitar upon which Simon Ambridge, the photographer there of course (and a mighty fine taker of photos) based his Hauser model. Of which I'm lucky enough to see two now every week 8)
That's right, rub it in. :D

I never get tired of looking at those Flickr pics. Good old Simon.
Getting better bit by bit, day by day.

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bacsidoan
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by bacsidoan » Thu Jan 12, 2017 9:31 pm

Guitar-ded wrote:
Stephen Kenyon wrote:That's the guitar upon which Simon Ambridge, the photographer there of course (and a mighty fine taker of photos) based his Hauser model. Of which I'm lucky enough to see two now every week 8)
That's right, rub it in. :D

I never get tired of looking at those Flickr pics. Good old Simon.
Go and play your spruce/satin wood guitar. That should quench your burning GAS for a while :)

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Guitar-ded
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Re: 1940 Hauser

Post by Guitar-ded » Thu Jan 12, 2017 10:16 pm

I will if you will. :wink:

No Gas here, no no no.
:chaud:
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