We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Construction and repair of Classical Guitar and related instruments
User avatar
Rick Yzaguirre
Posts: 52
Joined: Sat Apr 29, 2017 4:36 am
Location: South Texas

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by Rick Yzaguirre » Sat May 06, 2017 6:07 am

Hey rinnebi, I have the old Nippon Gakki type g-200 and g-50, and a 1970's g-245s, I'm very happy with the sounds they make. The 245 isn't as loud but I'm amazed at how even and clear the whole fretboard is. Anyways, I'm gonna be keeping an eye out for those other luthiers some are really good looking pieces. Thanks for the list I've been doing some searches.

User avatar
rinneby
Posts: 875
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:52 am
Location: Sweden

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Sat May 06, 2017 9:33 am

RocketFuel wrote:
Sat May 06, 2017 6:07 am
Hey rinnebi, I have the old Nippon Gakki type g-200 and g-50, and a 1970's g-245s, I'm very happy with the sounds they make. The 245 isn't as loud but I'm amazed at how even and clear the whole fretboard is. Anyways, I'm gonna be keeping an eye out for those other luthiers some are really good looking pieces. Thanks for the list I've been doing some searches.
Nice. Good luck and let us know what you come up with!

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1980 - Hirade Master Arte 8
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

User avatar
rinneby
Posts: 875
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:52 am
Location: Sweden

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Sat May 06, 2017 3:21 pm

Here's my Ryoji Matsuoka No.80 getting ready for French polish and other small adjustments. The top was in pretty bad shape, but nothing too serious. I expect it to be ready and shiny in about two weeks.

Image
Image
Image

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1980 - Hirade Master Arte 8
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

User avatar
andreas777
Posts: 491
Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2014 6:00 pm
Location: Germany

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by andreas777 » Sat May 06, 2017 4:02 pm

Looks very promising so far :-) Do you remove the finish from the top only or completely, including neck and head?
Happiness is when what you think what you say and what you do are in harmony.

User avatar
rinneby
Posts: 875
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:52 am
Location: Sweden

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Sat May 06, 2017 4:04 pm

andreas777 wrote:
Sat May 06, 2017 4:02 pm
Looks very promising so far :-) Do you remove the finish from the top only or completely, including neck and head?
Indeed. Only the top, as the rest of the guitar is practically in mint condition :) Strangely enough.

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1980 - Hirade Master Arte 8
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

User avatar
andreas777
Posts: 491
Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2014 6:00 pm
Location: Germany

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by andreas777 » Sat May 06, 2017 4:25 pm

rinneby wrote:
Sat May 06, 2017 4:04 pm
andreas777 wrote:
Sat May 06, 2017 4:02 pm
Looks very promising so far :-) Do you remove the finish from the top only or completely, including neck and head?
Indeed. Only the top, as the rest of the guitar is practically in mint condition :) Strangely enough.
/Jon
As already mentioned, I did something similar with my John Mills JM20 guitar. My luthier had to remove the complete finish because the sides and back were bleached out, but he decided not to remove the bridge. When it was finished there were some darker parts in the shellac below the bridge. My luthier told me that they will disappear in 1-2 years, but I was skeptical. At the end they really disappeared, so he was right.
Happiness is when what you think what you say and what you do are in harmony.

User avatar
rinneby
Posts: 875
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:52 am
Location: Sweden

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Sat May 06, 2017 5:10 pm

andreas777 wrote:
Sat May 06, 2017 4:25 pm
rinneby wrote:
Sat May 06, 2017 4:04 pm
andreas777 wrote:
Sat May 06, 2017 4:02 pm
Looks very promising so far :-) Do you remove the finish from the top only or completely, including neck and head?
Indeed. Only the top, as the rest of the guitar is practically in mint condition :) Strangely enough.
/Jon
As already mentioned, I did something similar with my John Mills JM20 guitar. My luthier had to remove the complete finish because the sides and back were bleached out, but he decided not to remove the bridge. When it was finished there were some darker parts in the shellac below the bridge. My luthier told me that they will disappear in 1-2 years, but I was skeptical. At the end they really disappeared, so he was right.
I wasn't sure about removing the bridge, but my luthier convinced me this was for the best. Fingers crossed it will work out well.

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1980 - Hirade Master Arte 8
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

User avatar
rinneby
Posts: 875
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:52 am
Location: Sweden

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Sun May 14, 2017 2:43 pm

Here's something special for all you (Japanese classical) guitar lovers! My newly acquired Taizo Minezawa, 1963.

Taizo MineZawa 峯澤 泰三 was born in 1901 and was especially famous for his violins. In 1957 he moved to Tokyo and started building classical guitars. He sadly left this earth in 1968 and did not make many guitars during his lifetime (Thanks to waikuentsui for this info). Our friend Brusko also says "...in Japan, he was said to be a master at the same level as Sakazo Nakade & Masaru Kohno" - I have no idea if this is true or not. However, looking at the guitar we can see similarities with the early Kono-models from the 60s and the build quality looks great.

There is a similar Taizo Minezawa, 1964 (but without original tuners and a crack on the top) one sale at j-guitar. The asking price is 170.000 yen. Other than that I haven't seen any guitars from this luthier.

The guitar is in Japan right now and I expect it to be in Sweden in about two weeks. Here are some low-res pictures for now:

Image
Image
Image
Image

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1980 - Hirade Master Arte 8
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

bullpuppy
Posts: 187
Joined: Sun Jul 14, 2013 7:29 pm

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by bullpuppy » Wed May 17, 2017 4:41 pm

Removing the bridge does make the refinishing much easier. There is always a risk of lifting up some wood leaving a scar that is very difficult to hide. Some luthers suggest planing it off and replace it with a bridge the same size. If you what to keep the old Bridge I first will drill two small holes at the end of the saddle slot. Then score around the perimeter at a slight angle inward with a razor blade. I then tape around the bridge with low tack tape and put on a layer of metal tape. I then slowly try to work razer blades between the bridge and the top starting at the corner. I may have tap them in gently. I then will use a old Icing Spatula that I shapen on one side and work it between the top of razor blade and the bridge. Often the bridge will pop off but on vintage guitars you may have to apply heat. I know this is somewhat complicated but once I started doing this way I have not had any problems with scaring. You want to minimize wood clinging to the bridge. Pieces that stick to the bridge I Carefully remove t and glue them back. Afterward's you have to clean up the bridge and the top. The worst thing I have encountered with top refinish is when someone trys to sand out gouges and scars and thins out the top and ruins the sound. If it is a factory over braced guitar then thinning it out may improve volume but on a Luther made guitar I usually sand so lightly I hardly effect the platina. Raising dents with water is the better appoach and filling scartches with finish is better than sanding.

The holes in the saddle slot are used to position the bridge for reglueing. Toothpicks work great for this.

So removing the bridge for a refinish is more work and increases risk. I am now more likely to try to improve the old finish with filling or remelting or a light laquer layer and level it out than do a refinish. I'm a lot more tolerant of cosmetic issues now than I use to be. I convinced myself it's called 'character' lol

User avatar
eno
Posts: 324
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2016 4:56 pm
Location: Boston, USA

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by eno » Thu May 18, 2017 9:56 pm

My new beautiful Brazilian RW Takamine C136S, 1976
The sound is gorgeous, full, rich, deep and nobel. A little dark, not bright, but that's what wanted to counter-balance my brilliant-bright Bernabe.
I will be definitely keeping and playing it
IMG_0264.JPG
IMG_0263.JPG
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Last edited by eno on Thu May 18, 2017 10:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Masaru Kohno No.6 1967
Rokutaro Nakade 1967
Mitsuru Tamura No.800 1969

bullpuppy
Posts: 187
Joined: Sun Jul 14, 2013 7:29 pm

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by bullpuppy » Thu May 18, 2017 10:00 pm

That is a beautiful guitar. Lucky you

henders
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2011 2:49 am
Location: California, USA

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by henders » Fri May 19, 2017 5:59 am

eno wrote:
Thu May 18, 2017 9:56 pm
My new beautiful Brazilian RW Takamine C136S, 1976
The sound is gorgeous, full, rich, deep and nobel. A little dark, not bright, but that's what wanted to counter-balance my brilliant-bright Bernabe.
I will be definitely keeping and playing it
IMG_0264.JPG
IMG_0263

Congratulations! I am glad you got it and like it so much. I really love mine. Great guitars. How is the playability?

Dave Stott
Posts: 170
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2016 11:24 am
Location: Connecticut

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by Dave Stott » Fri May 19, 2017 12:32 pm

I have trouble posting photo's here... But I've got a 1988 Takamine model E-30 classical that seems to be a rarity. As best I can tell, it was sold from 1988-1990.
The design of the E-30 is based on the “high end” oval sound hole Takamine Hirade TH90 model with the same rosette and headstock. However, it has laminate rosewood sides and back. There is uncertainty about whether the top is solid spruce or laminate. Even my local luthier isn't certain.

It has what Takamine calls a 3-Band Palathetic Pick-up. The fretboard is rosewood and the neck hasn't budged in all these years, so playability is awesome.

Nice warm sound out of it acoustically.
2015 Cordoba GK Pro Negra
2015 Cordoba Solista Cedar
2003 H-12 Froggy Bottom
1989 Takamine E-30 Classical

User avatar
eno
Posts: 324
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2016 4:56 pm
Location: Boston, USA

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by eno » Fri May 19, 2017 12:49 pm

henders wrote:
Fri May 19, 2017 5:59 am
Congratulations! I am glad you got it and like it so much. I really love mine. Great guitars. How is the playability?
The action is high right now but I'll get a luthier to lower it to 4mm. otherwise it's quite playable.
Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Masaru Kohno No.6 1967
Rokutaro Nakade 1967
Mitsuru Tamura No.800 1969

User avatar
eno
Posts: 324
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2016 4:56 pm
Location: Boston, USA

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by eno » Fri May 19, 2017 4:46 pm

Dave Stott wrote:
Fri May 19, 2017 12:32 pm
I have trouble posting photo's here... But I've got a 1988 Takamine model E-30 classical that seems to be a rarity. As best I can tell, it was sold from 1988-1990.
The design of the E-30 is based on the “high end” oval sound hole Takamine Hirade TH90 model with the same rosette and headstock. However, it has laminate rosewood sides and back. There is uncertainty about whether the top is solid spruce or laminate. Even my local luthier isn't certain.

It has what Takamine calls a 3-Band Palathetic Pick-up. The fretboard is rosewood and the neck hasn't budged in all these years, so playability is awesome.

Nice warm sound out of it acoustically.
Yes, Takamine has a lot of hybrid models with cutaways, electic pickups, oval soundholes etc. Strictly speaking they are not classicals any more, they are rather sort of semi-classical.
Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Masaru Kohno No.6 1967
Rokutaro Nakade 1967
Mitsuru Tamura No.800 1969

Return to “Luthiers”