We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Construction and repair of Classical Guitar and related instruments
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rinneby
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Location: Sweden

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Mon Jun 12, 2017 1:00 pm

petermc61 wrote:
Mon Jun 12, 2017 12:16 pm
Long list Jon..... :shock:

Good luck!
Yes, I should probably focus on the "famous" ones first :)

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1980 - Hirade Master Arte 8
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

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rinneby
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Mon Jun 12, 2017 1:52 pm

For everyone interested, me and Dandan reacently swapped guitars, he got my 1963 Taizo Minezawa and I his 1970 Sakazo Nakade 600E. We are both happy and a the deal went smooth.

Another update is that I will get my beloved Ryoji Matsuoka No.80 back from rehab on Wednesday. The main goal was not to make the guitar look new again, but simply to apply French polish while maintaining most of its integrity. Pictures soon to come.

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1980 - Hirade Master Arte 8
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

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eno
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Location: Boston, USA

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by eno » Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:00 pm

I recently bought a Rokutaru Nakade at an auction and received it today. The guitar needs some cleanup and restoration (refretting, tuners, may be refinish ets) but no major problems or cracks. Even with years old strings the sound is very pleasant, live and warm.
The label reads “Rokutaru Nakade, 1967, crafted by himself”

Many thanks to Jon and Curt for good advice!
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Last edited by eno on Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Masaru Kohno No.6 1967
Rokutaro Nakade 1967
Mitsuru Tamura No.800 1969

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eno
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Location: Boston, USA

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by eno » Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:05 pm

rinneby wrote:
Mon Jun 12, 2017 1:52 pm
Another update is that I will get my beloved Ryoji Matsuoka No.80 back from rehab on Wednesday. The main goal was not to make the guitar look new again, but simply to apply French polish while maintaining most of its integrity. Pictures soon to come.
/Jon
Jon, did the French refinish improve the sound?
Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Masaru Kohno No.6 1967
Rokutaro Nakade 1967
Mitsuru Tamura No.800 1969

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rinneby
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:08 pm

eno wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:00 pm
I recently bought a Rokutaru Nakade at an auction and received it today. The guitar needs some cleanup and restoration (refretting, tuners, may be refinish ets) but no major problems or cracks. Even with years old strings the sound is very pleasant, live and warm.
The label reads “Rokutaru Nakade, 1967, self-made”

Many thanks to Jon and Curt for good advice!
Great news! No problems with customs then I suppose? :)

Before you decide to re-fret and put on new tuners.... First some new strings and see if you like the sound and playability.

Keep us updated.

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1980 - Hirade Master Arte 8
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

Philosopherguy
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Location: Niagara, Ontario, Canada

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by Philosopherguy » Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:25 pm

rinneby wrote:
Mon Jun 12, 2017 8:39 am
I have plans, big plans, maybe too big plans...

Anyway, I'm thinking of writing an e-book (webpage) with information about all Japanese luthiers, past and current. On a second thought this project might be a little too ambitious, and a more realistic approach would be to at least start with the historically important ones. Who did I miss and who should I start with?

Akihiko Yamasyita
Alberto Nejime Ohno
Daisuke Kuriyama
Hakusui Imai
Hideo Ida
Hiroaki Honma
Hirohiko Hirose
Hiroshi Komori
Hiroshi Tamura
Hiroumi Yamaguchi
Jun Nakano
Jun Ohnishi
Kaoru Ono
Kawada Ikkoh
Kazuo Hashimoto
Kazuo Sato
Kazuo Toshi (Kazuo Ichiyanagi)
Kazuo Yairi
Kiyohide Oku
Kodama Kanoh
Masaji Nobe
Masaki Sakurai
Masaru Kohno
Masaru Matano
Mass Hirade
Matsui Kuniyoshi
Mitsuharu Hoshi
Mitsuru Tamura
Norimitsu Tsutsumi
Osamu Nakade
Osamu Tomita
Rokutaro Nakade
Ryoji Matsuoka
Sadao Yairi
Sakae Ishii
Sakazo Nakade
Satoru Sakuma
Seizo Shinano
Shuichi Komiyama
Shunpei Nishino
Shunsuke Yokoo
Sumio Kurosawa
Taizo Minezawa
Takahide Kaneko
Taro Maruyama
Tatsuhiko Hirose
Teruaki Nakade
Tetsuo Kurosawa
Toshihiko Nakade
Tsuji Wataru
Tsunao Kubo
Yoshimitsu Hoshino
Yoshinori Morii
Youhei Nishino
Yuichi Imai
Yuichi Nagasaki
Yukihide Chai
Yukinobu Chai
Yukio Nakade
Yutaka Iwata

/Jon
Another couple important luthiers would be Kuniharu Nobe, as the teacher of Kazou Sato and older brother of Masaji Nobe, and Masaji Nobe's son, who still makes guitars, Masafumi Nobe. Although Masaji Nobe would become the most famous in the Nobe family, Kuniharu Nobe guitars are well regarded and have been used by many to record. Masafumi Nobe guitars are beautiful as well. I have played examples from all 3 of the Nobe's and they are all very nice guitars.

Martin
*************************************************************
2013 Ramirez 130 Anos - Spruce
2013 Ramirez 4NE - Cedar
1998 Dean Harrington - Spruce
1977 Kuniharu Nobe - Spruce
1971 Yamaha GC3 - Spruce

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eno
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by eno » Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:36 pm

rinneby wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:08 pm
Great news! No problems with customs then I suppose? :)
Before you decide to re-fret and put on new tuners.... First some new strings and see if you like the sound and playability.
Keep us updated.
/Jon
No problems at customs. The tuners are broken so I can't even put new strings. But yes, I will first put new tuners and strings and play a little bit.
Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Masaru Kohno No.6 1967
Rokutaro Nakade 1967
Mitsuru Tamura No.800 1969

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rinneby
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Sat Jun 24, 2017 3:54 pm

Philosopherguy wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:25 pm
Another couple important luthiers would be Kuniharu Nobe, as the teacher of Kazou Sato and older brother of Masaji Nobe, and Masaji Nobe's son, who still makes guitars, Masafumi Nobe. Although Masaji Nobe would become the most famous in the Nobe family, Kuniharu Nobe guitars are well regarded and have been used by many to record. Masafumi Nobe guitars are beautiful as well. I have played examples from all 3 of the Nobe's and they are all very nice guitars.

Martin
Thank's Martin, much appreciated! Now added to the list.

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1980 - Hirade Master Arte 8
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

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rinneby
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Location: Sweden

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Sat Jun 24, 2017 3:57 pm

eno wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:05 pm
rinneby wrote:
Mon Jun 12, 2017 1:52 pm
Another update is that I will get my beloved Ryoji Matsuoka No.80 back from rehab on Wednesday. The main goal was not to make the guitar look new again, but simply to apply French polish while maintaining most of its integrity. Pictures soon to come.
/Jon
Jon, did the French refinish improve the sound?
Actually two things happened: First the guitar became a little easier to play, like the strings now has lower tension. Maybe due to the (less) stiffness of the top, or simply that the guitar now responds faster. Second, the sound became warmer and fuller, but not quite as clear (and Kohno-like) as before. This I don't mind at all. I can post some pictures when the weather gets better here in Sweden, its very grey now.

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1980 - Hirade Master Arte 8
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

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rinneby
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Location: Sweden

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:00 pm

Here's my "new" Matsuoka No.80 - Before and after the French polish + Nitrocellulose.

When I got the guitar the top was badly "lacquer cracked" (thick red/orange layer!) - What you see is actual leftovers from the dirt of those cracks, nothing is through the woods though. I didn't want to bleach or try to hide the battle scars, as it adds to the character and history of the guitar. At least I tried to convince my self that ;) Pretty vintage eh?

Before:
Image

After:
Image

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1980 - Hirade Master Arte 8
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

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eno
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Location: Boston, USA

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by eno » Sat Jun 24, 2017 8:39 pm

rinneby wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:00 pm
Here's my "new" Matsuoka No.80 - Before and after the French polish + Nitrocellulose.

When I got the guitar the top was badly "lacquer cracked" (thick red/orange layer!) - What you see is actual leftovers from the dirt of those cracks, nothing is through the woods though. I didn't want to bleach or try to hide the battle scars, as it adds to the character and history of the guitar. At least I tried to convince my self that ;) Pretty vintage eh?
/Jon
It seems that most of vintage Japanese guitars have those lacqer cracked finishes. I'm removing it right now from my Nakade.

One surprise I found: the original tuners have 40mm spacing (modern standard is 35mm). Anyone knows where to get those 40mm tuners? Alternatively I can use tuners that are separate per string but they are a bit expensive (StewMac sells Schertler per-string tuners).
Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Masaru Kohno No.6 1967
Rokutaro Nakade 1967
Mitsuru Tamura No.800 1969

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rinneby
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Sat Jun 24, 2017 8:50 pm

eno wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 8:39 pm
One surprise I found: the original tuners have 40mm spacing (modern standard is 35mm). Anyone knows where to get those 40mm tuners? Alternatively I can use tuners that are separate per string but they are a bit expensive (StewMac sells Schertler per-string tuners).
I'm using Gotoh 40G2000 on my Matsuoka, but that's 39mm. I think yours are the same. You sure its 40mm? That's very unusual.

Image

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1980 - Hirade Master Arte 8
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

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Guitar-ded
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Location: Canada

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by Guitar-ded » Sat Jun 24, 2017 10:00 pm

eno wrote:
Sat Jun 24, 2017 8:39 pm
...

One surprise I found: the original tuners have 40mm spacing (modern standard is 35mm). Anyone knows where to get those 40mm tuners? Alternatively I can use tuners that are separate per string but they are a bit expensive (StewMac sells Schertler per-string tuners).
To save you looking through old posts for the info, the 39mm Gotohs can be bought from either Amazon or Savage Classicals. They come in around the $125 US mark and Savage offer a few different options in buttons than Amazon.

Otherwise, the place for value for money custom tuners would be Rubner, although many others such as Rodgers also offer them but the price will be much increased.
Getting better bit by bit, day by day.

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eno
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by eno » Sat Jun 24, 2017 10:47 pm

Thank you guys, I found the 39mm Gotoh on Amazon
Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Masaru Kohno No.6 1967
Rokutaro Nakade 1967
Mitsuru Tamura No.800 1969

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eno
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by eno » Mon Jun 26, 2017 1:45 am

I'm wondering why some Japanese guitars have lables in Japanese and some in English or Spanish? Were the latter made for export? There is still a lot of English/Spanish-labeled guitars that stayed in Japan.
Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Masaru Kohno No.6 1967
Rokutaro Nakade 1967
Mitsuru Tamura No.800 1969

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