We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Construction and repair of Classical Guitar and related instruments
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rinneby
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Thu Jun 29, 2017 8:50 am

musguitar wrote:
Wed Jun 28, 2017 3:40 pm
My SHINANO SC-30. 650mm, thick solid top, lightweight, clear treble and not bassy. Jon, your description of your No. 83 captures my Shinano as well. And my other basis of comparison is my 1962 Masaru Kono.
That's a very early Kono! Do you like it? Where did you find it?

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

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musguitar
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by musguitar » Thu Jun 29, 2017 10:49 am

Jon, I absolutely love my Kohno. 1962, that means 2-years after apprentice under Arcangel Fernandez. As one can see it still has its original machine-head tuners-- it stays in tune. And he was still using KONO before he anglicized it to KOHNO, I believe in '66?
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rinneby
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Thu Jun 29, 2017 10:56 am

musguitar wrote:
Thu Jun 29, 2017 10:49 am
Jon, I absolutely love my Kohno. 1962, that means 2-years after apprentice under Arcangel Fernandez. As one can see it still has its original machine-head tuners-- it stays in tune. And he was still using KONO before he anglicized it to KOHNO, I believe in '66?
Sometime during -65 I believe :)

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

dandan
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by dandan » Mon Jul 03, 2017 3:46 pm

Here's a few pics of my most recent acquisition, a 1979 Hiroshi Tamura no. 10.
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1969 Rokutaro Nakade A9
1966 Sakazo Nakade model D
1972 Seiji Inaba
1977 Aria AG80

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rinneby
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Location: Sweden

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Tue Jul 04, 2017 11:13 am

dandan wrote:
Mon Jul 03, 2017 3:46 pm
Here's a few pics of my most recent acquisition, a 1979 Hiroshi Tamura no. 10.
Excellent! But let me guess, you don't like it as much as the Rokutaro ;)

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

dandan
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Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2011 2:16 pm
Location: newcastle-under-lyme, staffs, England

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by dandan » Tue Jul 04, 2017 11:17 am

rinneby wrote:
Tue Jul 04, 2017 11:13 am
dandan wrote:
Mon Jul 03, 2017 3:46 pm
Here's a few pics of my most recent acquisition, a 1979 Hiroshi Tamura no. 10.
Excellent! But let me guess, you don't like it as much as the Rokutaro ;)

/Jon
No, but that's my baby!
1969 Rokutaro Nakade A9
1966 Sakazo Nakade model D
1972 Seiji Inaba
1977 Aria AG80

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eno
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by eno » Tue Jul 04, 2017 11:37 am

Have you guys tried Mitsuru Tamura? They are more rare than Hiroshi and priced higher but I wonder if the price is higher because they are rare or because they sound better?
Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Masaru Kohno No.20 1975, No.6 1967
Rokutaro Nakade A9 1969, custom 1967, A1 1962
Mitsuru Tamura No.800 1969
Takamine C136S 1976

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musguitar
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by musguitar » Tue Jul 04, 2017 11:45 am

Nice Tamura dan. A Japanese guitar in my collection is a pre-Dynamic Nippon Gakki No. 25. It has a 645mm scale. I am enjoying it's short scale but the quality of the early 60s Yamaha is inconsistent. I am wondering if anyone in this thread knows of a 645mm or 640mm scale Japanese classical guitar from the late 60s, 70s and 80s that is affordable? (not more than $500)

dandan
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by dandan » Tue Jul 04, 2017 12:12 pm

That's quite a tough ask! I've seen Matanos and Matsuokas with 630 scale length. Would that suit you? 640 tends to be custom made so finding one under $500 is difficult.
1969 Rokutaro Nakade A9
1966 Sakazo Nakade model D
1972 Seiji Inaba
1977 Aria AG80

dandan
Posts: 585
Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2011 2:16 pm
Location: newcastle-under-lyme, staffs, England

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by dandan » Tue Jul 04, 2017 12:15 pm

eno wrote:
Tue Jul 04, 2017 11:37 am
Have you guys tried Mitsuru Tamura? They are more rare than Hiroshi and priced higher but I wonder if the price is higher because they are rare or because they sound better?
I've never tried one but I suspect they fetch higher prices because they are rarer. When they were built their equivalent models sold for similar prices. For example, a late 70s Mitsuru Tamura 1000 had a similar spec to my no.10 and sold for the same price (100,000¥).
1969 Rokutaro Nakade A9
1966 Sakazo Nakade model D
1972 Seiji Inaba
1977 Aria AG80

Philosopherguy
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Location: Niagara, Ontario, Canada

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by Philosopherguy » Tue Jul 11, 2017 2:38 am

Don't you just love that feeling when you have put a guitar away for a while and then you bring it out and play it again? It is like running into a lost love and sharing an old memory of times gone past. There is no better feeling then becoming reacquainted with the past, sometimes.

I picked up my Kuniharu Nobe today for the first time in probably about 5 or 6 months and now I remember what I love about the guitar. It has such a full sound and it has a character unlike any of my other guitars. It isn't anywhere near my loudest guitar, but it has such a pleasing tone to it. It is sweet and seductive. Even though it is 658mm scale, it plays amazingly good with it's 51mm nut. I find I can easily do stretches that take just as much, if not more, work on my 650mm guitars.

Anyways, I thought I would share this moment with those who love Japanese guitars. I highly recommend anyone in the market to pick up a Nobe. I just have too many guitars to play it all the time and I have nowhere to store them all in my "play" area.

Martin
*************************************************************
2013 Ramirez 130 Anos - Spruce
2013 Ramirez 4NE - Cedar
1998 Dean Harrington - Spruce
1977 Kuniharu Nobe - Spruce
1971 Yamaha GC3 - Spruce

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eno
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Location: Boston, USA

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by eno » Thu Jul 13, 2017 1:28 am

I think I'm having a Japanes guitars GAS attack :D So a few updates:

I finished restoration of my Rokutaro Nakade 1967, photos are here . It's still waking up after refinish and many years of sleeping in a Japanese basement or attick but it already sounds very beautiful.

Then I just received Sakazo Nakade 1973 yesterday. It has a few dings and some wear on the fretboard but otherwise it's in a playable condition, I just cleaned it and put new strings. Sounds fantastic, warm, live and colourful, with it's own character, a litlle different from Rokutaru but close. But it also needs time to wake up.

Some info from i-net on Nakade brothers:

"Sakazo Nakade, one of the best Japanese luthiers, is highly regarded by Japanese nation and by many called “The Father of Modern Japanese Luthiery”. Sakazo Nakade together with his older brother Rokutaro apprenticed under Japanese Master Violin Luthier Mr. Kinpachi Miyamoto in 1930’s. Miyamoto had a chance to examine and measure Andres Segovia's performance guitar while he performed in Tokyo in 1929. Their master never ventured into guitar making, but the apprentices Nakade brothers did. They also went to Spain to study guitar making from the Spanish masters. Nakade guitars are high quality instruments and have a big following in Japan. They were famous in early 60's before Masaru Kohno got famous in the late 60's. During 1960s both brothers were famous and their guitars equally highly regarded in Japan. Both brothers were selling their guitars at the same price level as Masaru Kohno. I believe that Rokutaro passed away in early 1970’s. Sakazo continued his work until his death in 1993 (at the age of 87). In late 1960’s/early 1970’s he was joined by his 2 sons Teruaki, Toshihiko and later on by his youngest son Yukio. Rokutaro's son Osamu Nakade, also travelled to Spain in early 1960's and started his own workshop after his return to Japan in 1970. All these luthiers were making very high grade guitars and successfully competed with Masaru Kohno on Japanese market. Their workshops were never as huge undertakings as Kohno’s workshop hence their guitars were sold outside Japan in quite limited numbers. In fact their guitars in many cases were of much higher grade than Kohno models sold for the same price. From what I know, from the whole group of mentioned above luthiers, only Toshihiko Nakade still makes guitars. His lowest model No.100 is priced 1000000 yen, which in US distribution would translate to at least $15 000. Naturally used guitars made by these all these luthiers are very highly sought by Japanese players and guitar collectors. The highest prices are being put on Sakazo and Toshihiko guitars, while (oh irony) guitars made by other members of Nakade family offer very similar quality."

"In the early 1960s in Spain, a young Sakazo Nakade was said to have been mentored under the guidance of Jose Ramirez, arguably one of the greatest modern luthiers of all-time. Sakazo Nakade returned to Japan in the 1970s and went on to become the leading figure in the development of modern classical guitar production in Japan during his time. He was considered as the Father of Japanese Classical Guitar Luthiery and an absolute master craftsman who built masterpieces with phenomenal aesthetics and sound and coached many of today's top Japanese luthiers. Sakazo Nakade died around 1993 at the age of 88. His legacy is carried on by his three sons: Terauki, Toshihiko, and Yukio who are now among the premier living Japanese luthiers today."
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Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Masaru Kohno No.20 1975, No.6 1967
Rokutaro Nakade A9 1969, custom 1967, A1 1962
Mitsuru Tamura No.800 1969
Takamine C136S 1976

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rinneby
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Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Thu Jul 13, 2017 4:30 am

Philosopherguy wrote:
Tue Jul 11, 2017 2:38 am
Don't you just love that feeling when you have put a guitar away for a while and then you bring it out and play it again? It is like running into a lost love and sharing an old memory of times gone past. There is no better feeling then becoming reacquainted with the past, sometimes.
I sure do! The last time that happened was when I brought out my good old Masaru Matano Clase 600 - What an wonderful instrument, at least when you are in for some good old (loud) Ramirez style playing ;)

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

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rinneby
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Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:52 am
Location: Sweden

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:56 pm

eno wrote:
Thu Jul 13, 2017 1:28 am
Then I just received Sakazo Nakade 1973 yesterday. It has a few dings and some wear on the fretboard but otherwise it's in a playable condition, I just cleaned it and put new strings. Sounds fantastic, warm, live and colourful, with it's own character, a litlle different from Rokutaru but close. But it also needs time to wake up.
Very nice guitar indeed. Looks very much like my No.600 E from 1970. Mine has a beautiful clear sound with great sustain, but I wouldn't call it particularly "warm" - It's easy to play too!

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All the best from Sweden

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

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rinneby
Posts: 800
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:52 am
Location: Sweden

Re: We who love Japanese classical guitars - Delcamp

Post by rinneby » Thu Jul 13, 2017 4:00 pm

The GAS continues... Bought myself a K. Yairi YC-250 from 1976. It's supposed to be the top model from the 70s and it's the first I've seen. Pictures and a little review coming on Monday.

/Jon
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1975 - Atushi Nakamura No.15
1977 - Kuniharu Nobe No.15
1996 - Masaru Kohno Maestro

Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

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