Making Strips

Construction and repair of Classical Guitar and related instruments
Jim Frieson
Posts: 470
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 12:48 pm

Making Strips

Post by Jim Frieson » Thu Jul 06, 2017 10:08 am

Sometimes I make strips with a plane . These rosewood strips are .8 mm thick .
I can only do this with a Japanese plane .
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Bruno Piancatelli
Amateur luthier
Posts: 129
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2011 3:09 am
Location: Argentina

Re: Making Strips

Post by Bruno Piancatelli » Thu Jul 06, 2017 12:11 pm

nice! how long are those? and 0.8mm is pretty thick

Alan Carruth
Luthier
Posts: 2537
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 6:56 pm

Re: Making Strips

Post by Alan Carruth » Thu Jul 06, 2017 5:53 pm

Two things I've found that help a lot with this are to make the strips narrow, and to wet the surface of the wood just before taking the cut. The width of the strips is obvious. Wetting the wood makes it more flexible, so the chip doesn't get broken as it comes off the cutter.

MessyTendon
Posts: 1206
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2015 1:33 am

Re: Making Strips

Post by MessyTendon » Fri Jul 07, 2017 2:17 am

Are those used for purling, or rosette tiles? The million dollar question, is that a high end japense chisel or low end one? I am thinking of buying a cheapo amazon special and tuning it up myself. Considering most of the high end stuff is made of hitachi steel, and the price is all over the place I just dont know.

I've bought expensive 300$ japanese knives, and my favorite one is a cheaper blade made of the same steel.

Jim Frieson
Posts: 470
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 12:48 pm

Re: Making Strips

Post by Jim Frieson » Fri Jul 07, 2017 3:48 am

MessyTendon wrote:
Fri Jul 07, 2017 2:17 am
Are those used for purling, or rosette tiles? The million dollar question, is that a high end japense chisel or low end one? I am thinking of buying a cheapo amazon special and tuning it up myself. Considering most of the high end stuff is made of hitachi steel, and the price is all over the place I just dont know.

I've bought expensive 300$ japanese knives, and my favorite one is a cheaper blade made of the same steel.
These are just accidental . I was trimming edges to make a joint . But yes I make and use strips from a variety of woods and use in many ways .

If you buy a real Japanese plane from overseas , the big cost is transport , post . They tend to be heavy .
I never bought a plane new here . I have I guess about 25 in use and another 25 in storage boxes . Maybe not too bright to have tools you don't use but I just like them . I got them all used , prices ranging from 500 to 3500 yen , or 5 to 35 dollars .
Some of them are hand forged , very high quality . Some are lesser quality . But they are all good .
The thing of note about Japanese blades in comparison with western blades - especially Japanese laminated blades is this :
When tools are forged the blade is quenched when it is red hot . This makes the steel very hard , and very brittle .
So it must be softened , which is called tempering .
Western blades are tempered to be softer ; Japanese blades are not softened as much , they are harder . ( a general rule , not an 'always ' maxim )
Japanese blades are laminated , mild steel to carbon steel . The mild steel takes the shocks , and the carbon steel does the cutting .

So if you buy a Japanese plane just try to ensure it is laminated steel blade . Some are not and I have planes in use that are not laminated blades .
In general , Japanese standards are quite high , so a new plane should be good .
If you buy a used plane just try to get one that looks like the blade fits well and doesn't look like it is broken .
Many of mine were cracked , with blades too loose or too tight , and I spent days repairing them . I even made a few planes myself .
In Japan , the purchaser and user of the plane is expected to true the action of it himself and to know something about adjustment .
There is a special plane with blade at 90 degrees , and those are used to true the sole of the Japanese plane .

Jim Frieson
Posts: 470
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 12:48 pm

Re: Making Strips

Post by Jim Frieson » Fri Jul 07, 2017 4:07 am

Alan Carruth wrote:
Thu Jul 06, 2017 5:53 pm
Two things I've found that help a lot with this are to make the strips narrow, and to wet the surface of the wood just before taking the cut. The width of the strips is obvious. Wetting the wood makes it more flexible, so the chip doesn't get broken as it comes off the cutter.
True . Cutting wide strips is hard on the arms .

If you ever have access to a Japanese stationary-blade moving -bed planing machine , you might find it very interesting .
I have a little one , very heavy machine but I can lift it , and if I am cutting a lot it saves sweat of my brow .
They are used to make the interior of the Japanese traditional room that is found in every house . The big ones are made to handle 4 x 4 and so on , timber .
I did have access to one , it was right in my shop floor , and I miss that thing .
Up to about .5 mm , not much need for wetting , but above that I kept a pot of hot water and a sponge at the ready .
Non stripey and plain grain padouk , jacaranda , holly , no problems . Really hard wood I just never tried .
The best wood I ever found for planing was Yukon yellow cedar , you could just make veneers all day with it .
No matter how sharp the blade , cutting veneers without a nose-bar there with always be fraying of the wood .
The one advantage of this is it is much easier to dye such strips .

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