The tilt of the guitar neck

Construction and repair of Classical Guitar and related instruments
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Manuel Najera
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Re: The tilt of the guitar neck

Post by Manuel Najera » Wed Oct 25, 2017 12:54 am

Trevor Gore wrote:
Tue Oct 24, 2017 11:20 pm
That sounds rather like too much relief, giving the effect of a rising fretboard extension, rather than a wrong neck angle. But the two do interrelate, of course.
Now that you mentioned it, the neck does have too much relief, but it was not intentional. Is there an easy fix?

Douglass Scott
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Re: The tilt of the guitar neck

Post by Douglass Scott » Wed Oct 25, 2017 3:23 pm

geoff-bristol wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 10:11 pm
... So even with a 2mm neck rise that equates to an angle of about 1/3rd of a degree... at the heel cut. Just about markable with a sharp pencil !
I'm not sure i would be able to measure if the sides at the heel were out of square by 1/3rd of a deg ?
This is exactly right, and why a lot of experienced makers don't think it's worth fussing over.

If you're using thick laminated sides, or have heavy laminated linings already glued to the sides, you might feel a little tension when you bend the neck down by that tiny amount. Using the Spanish method, however, with sides <= 2mm thick, and with kerfed linings (which are still flexible of course once glued to the sides) you should feel no tension whatsoever as you secure the sides into a heel block that has the slots cut at 90 deg.

Like others have mentioned, building tension into the guitar I also think is deleterious, but cutting the heel slots at 90 deg and bending the neck down by 2mm is not necessarily introducing any tension.

Extra tidbit - I wouldn't glue the neck to the top flat before bending down the 2mm of rake. Fit the shelf to the top in the 2mm rake position so the top doesn't get any bend in it. This helps a lot when fitting the fingerboard.

mitch lees
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Re: The tilt of the guitar neck

Post by mitch lees » Thu Oct 26, 2017 7:04 am

Douglass Scott wrote:
Wed Oct 25, 2017 3:23 pm
Extra tidbit - I wouldn't glue the neck to the top flat before bending down the 2mm of rake. Fit the shelf to the top in the 2mm rake position so the top doesn't get any bend in it. This helps a lot when fitting the fingerboard
Douglas,

What a simple but very sensible idea - why hadn't I thought of that!

Mitch

Douglass Scott
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Re: The tilt of the guitar neck

Post by Douglass Scott » Thu Oct 26, 2017 3:21 pm

mitch lees wrote:
Thu Oct 26, 2017 7:04 am
Douglass Scott wrote:
Wed Oct 25, 2017 3:23 pm
Extra tidbit - I wouldn't glue the neck to the top flat before bending down the 2mm of rake. Fit the shelf to the top in the 2mm rake position so the top doesn't get any bend in it. This helps a lot when fitting the fingerboard
Douglas,

What a simple but very sensible idea - why hadn't I thought of that!

Mitch
It's a bit more work fitting the shelf, but more than balances out when fitting the fingerboard later. Also looks better. :)

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Michael Lazar
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Re: The tilt of the guitar neck

Post by Michael Lazar » Fri Oct 27, 2017 2:25 pm

Hauser, Romanillos and a number of other luthiers I know of achieve their desired neck angle in a stress fee manner as follows:

1. Cut the side slot at 90 degrees
2. Cut the shelf for the top down by the thickness of the top plus the desired amount of rake (4mm for a 2mm top and 2mm rake)
2. plane the neck so that it angles upward from the 12th fret (body joint) to the nut. Start at the 12th fret.
3. The underside of the fret board will need to be angled from the body joint to the sound hole.

I don't consider myself to be all that good with hand tools and for years I thought this method would be too difficult for me so I always achieved my neck angle by tapering my fret boards from 7mm to 5mm using a thickness sander and a slave board (about 10 minutes work). But I tried this for the first time when building my first Friederich replica and found it to be surprisingly easy. I used a block plane, straight edge and a long sanding block to finish up. To adjust the fret board, I pinned it at the center of fret 1, taped sand paper across the top from fret 12 to sound hole, marked the underside of the fret board and worked it from side to side until it fit perfectly. All in all, not a lot of extra work.

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Trevor Gore
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Re: The tilt of the guitar neck

Post by Trevor Gore » Sat Oct 28, 2017 2:43 am

Manuel Najera wrote:
Wed Oct 25, 2017 12:54 am
Trevor Gore wrote:
Tue Oct 24, 2017 11:20 pm
That sounds rather like too much relief, giving the effect of a rising fretboard extension, rather than a wrong neck angle. But the two do interrelate, of course.
Now that you mentioned it, the neck does have too much relief, but it was not intentional. Is there an easy fix?
Easy for me. I just adjust the truss rod. Otherwise its pulling the frets, planing the board and re-fretting.
Trevor Gore: Classical Guitar Design and Build

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Manuel Najera
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Re: The tilt of the guitar neck

Post by Manuel Najera » Mon Nov 06, 2017 7:01 pm

Trevor Gore wrote:
Sat Oct 28, 2017 2:43 am
Manuel Najera wrote:
Wed Oct 25, 2017 12:54 am
Trevor Gore wrote:
Tue Oct 24, 2017 11:20 pm
That sounds rather like too much relief, giving the effect of a rising fretboard extension, rather than a wrong neck angle. But the two do interrelate, of course.
Now that you mentioned it, the neck does have too much relief, but it was not intentional. Is there an easy fix?
Easy for me. I just adjust the truss rod. Otherwise its pulling the frets, planing the board and re-fretting.
Thanks for the reply Trevor. I worked a little bit more on the higher frets and that solved 98% of the problem. I only have the 4th string with a minor buzz on fret 12. But that was good enough for the client.

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