Philip Woodfield and David Argent Guitars

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rounie
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Philip Woodfield and David Argent Guitars

Post by rounie » Sun Mar 30, 2008 6:51 am

Hi Delcampers,
Has anyone played Woodfield&Argent Spruce Lattice Braced Guitars? If so,can you give a Review Please.......it will be highly appreciated... 8)
Let Music Unite All............
Richard Howell No.408 Cedar/Indian-2007

stevnpa

Re: Philip Woodfield and David Argent Guitars

Post by stevnpa » Sun Mar 30, 2008 12:20 pm

Hi I have played several David Argent lattice guitars in both spruce and cedar. They have a very immediate attack, great volume and sustain, with spruce having the edge in terms of clarity I'd say. They are very comfortable for the left hand, but they are very heavy instruments, which puts some people off. I like them as they have lattice qualities, but with a more traditional sound.

Philip Woodfield makes superb guitar and I think he's very good value. I've tried a spruce top lattice, and a spruce Series II guitar, both of which were excellent; great volume and sustain, easy playability and look like works of art. The series II uses carbon fibre with fan bracing, so while the lattice is a little louder I'd say the Series II had more tonal variety. I've recently played a Series II with soundports which give it an even more open, powerful sound.

Both makers are of very high quality, if I were to pick one it would be the Woodfield Series II, but of course that's very personal and subjective.

Steve.

rounie
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Location: New delhi-India

Re: Philip Woodfield and David Argent Guitars

Post by rounie » Sun Mar 30, 2008 2:03 pm

Hey Steve,
Philip makes BEAUTIFUL Guitars,and his sense of Aesthetic is Matched by Few-The Series-2 Seems like a Good Choice,and i didnt knew he puts Soundports-But this is Just Great.I am fond of Traditional Guitars but with Modern Touches-Ive played a Lattice by Alejandro Cervantes In Spruce and found it to be Terrific,but i belive the Series 2 would be Almost equal to the Lattice with Modern Touches to it-the Tonal Variation is Most Important,and a small difference wont matter....HOWEVER i am also researching guitars such as Michael Gee Layered/Double Top,Kolya Panhyuzen,Giaochino Giussani-How would the Woodfield Stand up to them....?
Your Reply would be Geatly Appreciated...... 8)
Let Music Unite All............
Richard Howell No.408 Cedar/Indian-2007

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pogmoor
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Re: Philip Woodfield and David Argent Guitars

Post by pogmoor » Sun Mar 30, 2008 8:46 pm

As you will know from the Woodfield website, this is what Ray Burley says about his Woodfield lattice guitar:

"I can honestly say that my new Philip Woodfield lattice (Grand Concert) guitar comes as close to the perfect instrument as could be imagined. It has volume, is comfortable to play and the balance between bass and treble is exceptional. The guitar has rich, resonant basses and clear, ringing trebles with bags of sustain. I will be using it for all my future concerts and recordings. It's a fine instrument."

I've heard Ray's guitar, both in concert in a trio of Woodfield guitars and close to in a lesson and I can confirm that it's a very impressive guitar, both powerful and well balanced - and able to produce a wide range of tonal colours.
Eric from GuitarLoot
Renaissance and Baroque freak; classical guitars by Paul Fischer (1995) and Lester Backshall (2008)
Yamaha SLG 130NW silent classical guitar (2014), Ramirez Guitarra del Tiempo (2017)

rounie
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Joined: Mon Sep 11, 2006 5:58 pm
Location: New delhi-India

Re: Philip Woodfield and David Argent Guitars

Post by rounie » Mon Mar 31, 2008 3:58 am

Eric,
Thank you for your Reply-it is Welcome,as it will help me get closer to my Second Guitar in Spruce.The Only Hitch that i did not notice earlier was that Philip finishes Only In Shellac,and that would be a Problem for me in the Hot&Humid Climate of India............ :roll:
Maybe i will try the finish and see what Happens......... :chaud:
Let Music Unite All............
Richard Howell No.408 Cedar/Indian-2007

rounie
Posts: 615
Joined: Mon Sep 11, 2006 5:58 pm
Location: New delhi-India

Re: Philip Woodfield and David Argent Guitars

Post by rounie » Wed Apr 02, 2008 2:45 pm

Hey Steve&Eric,
How would you compare the Guitars of Philip Woodfield,David Rouse,and Michael Gee.....in all aspects,and what would you settle for if had to choose one of them.I had a Michael Gee in mind,but his prices are Strastospheric Nowadays,and i would like to know which builder would make a Good choice for the Guitar in Spruce?.........Unless i hit Jackpot on a Lottery...... :chaud:
Your Reply is Greatly Valued......... :bravo:
Let Music Unite All............
Richard Howell No.408 Cedar/Indian-2007

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pogmoor
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Re: Philip Woodfield and David Argent Guitars

Post by pogmoor » Wed Apr 02, 2008 4:46 pm

Can't answer that, I'm afraid. I've never come across Michael Gee or David Rouse guitars.
Eric from GuitarLoot
Renaissance and Baroque freak; classical guitars by Paul Fischer (1995) and Lester Backshall (2008)
Yamaha SLG 130NW silent classical guitar (2014), Ramirez Guitarra del Tiempo (2017)

Phil McKelliget
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Re: Philip Woodfield and David Argent Guitars

Post by Phil McKelliget » Sat Nov 04, 2017 7:21 pm

I’ve played a Masaru Kohno since 1983 but I’ve also owned a David Argent and a Michael Gee so might have something to add to this discussion. I fell in love with the Argent from the moment I first played it. It has a lot of volume and a very direct sound but at the same time is sweet and well balanced. It also had a fantastic action. What I didn’t like was the way it reacted to variations in humidity and temperature, including the effect of my own body. It was constantly changing and in the end I tired of it. The Gee was more stable but did require warming up. I’ve been told that the little cavities in the top generated by the sandwiched Nomex need to be energised by playing before the guitar responds properly. Again, I tired of this and returned to the Kohno, which is a very stable instrument. My quest for the perfect guitar continues as I have a Philip Woodfield on order, although I’ll have to wait till next year before I can comment on this.

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