D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Nov 03, 2015 4:10 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D05.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



Now we are going to work on a series of exercises:
To render polyphony clearly, you have to be able to control the force applied by each of the fingers plucking the strings.
Here is a little exercise. The first few times that you try it, the exercise will seem impossible to master. Tell yourself that this difficulty, though very real, will be resolved after an hour of diligent work.


We'll start with 2 voices, exercise 107, page 159.
- Bring out the bass played with the thumb. Then bring out the soprano played with the ring finger.

Next, 3 voices, exercise 108 page 159
- Bring out the bass played with the thumb. Then bring out the soprano played with the ring finger. Then bring out the alto played with the middle finger.

And now 4 voices, exercise 109 page 159
- Bring out the bass played with the thumb. Then bring out the soprano played with the ring finger. Then bring out the alto played with the middle finger. Finally bring out the tenor played by the index finger.

Youtube



Once you've managed to bring out a single note in a chord, you've got it beaten!
The easiest thing to start with is to bring out the bass with the thumb.
It can help to exaggerate the movement of whichever finger is plucking more strongly than the others, as I demonstrate on this video.

There are other ways of distinguishing one voice from another. You can apply a different articulation to one voice from that applied to another. For instance, you might play one voice staccato and the other legato. You can also distinguish voices by varying the timbre of each voice. For example, you could play the bass with the flesh of the thumb and the other voices with the nails. We'll see these other techniques in the next lessons.




Today we'll look at 5 pieces.
- page 18 Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
This piece in two sections is based on a sequence of 4 chords: D minor, C major, D minor, A major.
This sequence of 4 chords is repeated in bars 5 to 8, with the last two chords both incorporated into bar 7, in order to be able to finish on the tonic in bar 8, with a chord of D minor. Luys de Narvàez made use of the same contracting together of two chords in bar 7 of his Diferencias sobre guardame las vacas (previous lesson).
As for the rhythm, in the first section, bars 1 to 24, the beat is divided into 4 eighth notes (quavers). In the second section, bars 25 to 64, the beat is divided into 3 eighth notes (quavers). The tempo remains the same, with the overall length of a bar switching from a half note (minim) to a dotted quarter note (dotted crotchet).
Feel free to improvise on this sequence of 4 chords.

Youtube



- page 46 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Menuet Anh. 132
This is a minuet with two voices, in the binary form (AABB). The minuet here is in E minor. The first part concludes in the key of the relative major, G major. The second part concludes in the main key, E minor.

Youtube



- page 76 Johann Kaspar Mertz (1806-1856) Ländler opus 12 n°1
A Ländler based on 3 chords, A major, D major and E major (the three bass strings of the guitar). It's easy to make it ring out. The 3 eighth notes (quavers) which start the Ländler can be played freely, without strict tempo. This will help to emphasise (by contrast) the stability of the tempo from bar 9.

Youtube



- page 86 Juliàn Arcas (1832-1882) Preludio en re mayor
This prelude is made up of arpeggios. The second part makes systematic use of the diminished 7th chord.

Youtube


Youtube



- page 108 Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja
Here we have a transcription in A minor by Juliàn Arcas. The work uses the rhythm of the polonaise.

Youtube




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 159 Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
- page 18 Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
- page 108 Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja


Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François


Exam qualifying submissions: :
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja

Eric de Vries
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja

Håvard.Bergene
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja

Tim Wang
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa

ChrisCapener
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa

John Montes
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja

Loiseng Kee
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja

Stewart Doyle
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja

Giuseppe Gasparini
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja

Satyajit Kadle
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa

Marko Räsänen
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja

Michele Franceschini
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja
:( + ♫ = :)

EricKatz
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by EricKatz » Tue Nov 10, 2015 10:28 am

Lesson 3 has another 6 challenging pieces/exercises!

After one week I start way back in history with the oldest pieces: Neusiedler (1536) and Bach (1725).
The Wascha Mesa (=passamezzo) comes from a collection of lute pieces. I skipped repeats. Capo at 3rd fret.


Youtube


The lovely little menuet was originally written for keyboard, in D minor. I have a record of the complete notebook, with the menuet played by Marga Scheurich at 95 bpm. To my ears that sounds better than the 120 bpm indicated in our lesson book. By the way, this time I play the B section twice :wink:

Youtube


It's nice to know that the Introduction is in fact the general introduction to a collection of 6 Ländlers (Op.12 Erinnerung an Ischl. VI Ländler für die Gitarre von J.K. Mertz - 1846). Just as Neusiedler, Mertz was born in Presburg (Bratislava), Hungarian at that time. For all his compositions he used the name J.K. Mertz. Since some German authors used the name Johann Kaspar Mertz he got into history by that name. But his real name is Caspar(us) Joseph(us) Mertz.

Youtube


I don't know what happend in the tempo indication. I would think allegro means every 1/8 note at 120-168 bpm. Mr. Delcamp wants to speed us up to 240bpm. Nevertheless, I'm still too slow :oops:

Youtube


For the next piece Arcas used a theme from the zarzuela "El Postillon de la Rioja" by the famous Spanish composer Oudrid (the lesson book attributes this to the wrong zarzuela). It's the second half of part 5.Bolero. What looks like an instrumental piece is in fact a song, by two or three vocalist. Surprisingly! You can look it up at the website of Bibliotheca Digital Hispánica.

Youtube


Maybe the most difficult piece of this lesson! Exercise 109.

Youtube

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Marko Räsänen » Tue Nov 10, 2015 5:01 pm

Well played, Eric! :bravo:

I agree the pieces are very challenging. So far I've only worked with the two mandatory pieces and the Bach piece (although I seem to recall there's some controversy regarding whether this piece was actually composed by J.S. or his son C.P.E.).

Neusiedler: My only comment for this one is to add some articulation to make the piece sound more interesting. I'm hoping you'll find the time to record this piece again later into this lesson.

Bach: In measure 8, I find keeping the 'g' ringing until the end of the measure near impossible, can't just find a left hand position to do it. In your recording there was some harmonic ringing there, but I think it wasn't the open 3rd string? But on the other hand, I feel that you don't damp the open treble strings enough, which is essential (in my opinion) for counterpoint. Save for a couple of spots in the 2nd part, at any given time there should be only two voices sounding. Accomplishing that in many places requires the use of right hand fingers for damping (similarly to the damping exercise in the first lesson), and it adds another layer of complexity to the piece. Other than that, I liked the way you performed the piece, and I think the tempo you chose was just right.
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Håvard.Bergene
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Håvard.Bergene » Mon Nov 16, 2015 5:38 pm

Hi Eric. Good job. And all the pieces after one week :bravo:
I noticed that our professor use the capo on 2nd fret in Wascha mesa. A little more work required on the rhythm in the second part.
I think the rhythm in El Postillon is also quite challenging, but you managed that well. Only some bum notes here and there.
In Polyphonie you managed to bring out the separate voices nicely.
Overall :casque: :merci:

Here are my recordings of the required pieces

Delcamp Polyhponie N°109 (I forgot, and recorded 107+108+109. PS I did not practice this very much.)

Youtube


Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja

Youtube


Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa (had a better recording, but the camcorder did not start recording (file id counter had reached 9999), i.e. audio only, and I was running out of time, so I just had to settle with this recording)

Youtube


If time permits, I'll record the other pieces later this month.
Alhambra 11P

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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by John Montes » Wed Nov 18, 2015 2:01 am

Nicely done Eric!

Thanks for the musicological nuggets and background on some of the pieces and composers. I always enjoy the additional background information in trying to better understand the composers, the music, and interpret accordingly.

We could probably post a note about the Zarzuela attribution into the Delcamp thread for score corrections and it could get fixed in a future release of the lesson workbooks

The Postillion has had me busy this week, hope to post videos soon.
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EricKatz
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by EricKatz » Wed Nov 18, 2015 3:50 pm

Marko Räsänen wrote: Bach: In measure 8, I find keeping the 'g' ringing until the end of the measure near impossible, can't just find a left hand position to do it. In your recording there was some harmonic ringing there, but I think it wasn't the open 3rd string?
Yes, m.8 is a bit strange. I just found some time to take another look at it. In any case, the notes are right. The dotted g note must keep ringing the whole measure long, with a bass line under it (G - g - f# - e - d#). But the fingering on p. 46 makes that impossible: the upper melody uses the same g (open 3rd string) as the bass line.
Menuet D major BWV Anh. 32.png
This could be solved in three ways:
(1) the bass line uses 4th string/5th fret as g-note, in stead of the open 3rd string (as in m.16).
(2) the g note is played twice: on the first beat as upper melody note, on the second beat as part of the bass line. After this second time, we let it ring throughout the measure. The result, however, is not what is written in the score!
(3) we play the upper g-note only one beat long. After that we play the note again as a 1/8 note and damp it or let it die. This is also not what's in the score.
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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Marko Räsänen » Wed Nov 18, 2015 6:02 pm

Eric de Vries wrote:This could be solved in three ways:
(1) the bass line uses 4th string/5th fret as g-note, in stead of the open 3rd string (as in m.16).
(2) the g note is played twice: on the first beat as upper melody note, on the second beat as part of the bass line. After this second time, we let it ring throughout the measure. The result, however, is not what is written in the score!
(3) we play the upper g-note only one beat long. After that we play the note again as a 1/8 note and damp it or let it die. This is also not what's in the score.
I cannot make 1 nor 2 work. I could barely do it with my Almansa because of thicker neck profile, but with Cordoba's less bulky neck, it just doesn't work. I know it sounds a bit counter-intuitive :D

At the moment I've lost my motivation with guitar a bit, but I would expect it to return soon. It usually does. Be as it may, my recordings may not be due until the next lesson has began.

edit: I just listened to professor Delcamp's recording of Bach, and he seems to do (3). I guess that's an acceptable compromise between the original score and the limitations of guitar as an instrument.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by EricKatz » Wed Nov 18, 2015 9:08 pm

Marko Räsänen wrote: I just listened to professor Delcamp's recording of Bach, and he seems to do (3). I guess that's an acceptable compromise between the original score and the limitations of guitar as an instrument.
That would be the same compromise as in Vaghe belezze m.2.
It's all a bit confusing, since there's not a short explanation in the lessons. Maybe it is better to avoid this in a didactical environment
Marko Räsänen wrote: At the moment I've lost my motivation with guitar a bit, but I would expect it to return soon. It usually does.
I'm glad you still see the light at the end of the tunnel!
Last edited by EricKatz on Wed Nov 18, 2015 9:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Tim Wang
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Tim Wang » Sat Nov 21, 2015 7:10 am

Here's my Oudrid,


Youtube


other videos will follow up shortly!

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by ChrisCapener » Sat Nov 21, 2015 7:31 am

Well Played Eric, Havard and Tim :casque: :merci:

I can't match your fluidity but I think I've improved a bit over last year's effort :?:

Here is my Oudrid.
Youtube


:bye:

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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by John Montes » Sat Nov 21, 2015 10:48 pm

Finally got some time to finish recording, next week will be pretty busy here in the U.S. with a Thanksgiving holiday and many family related gatherings.

Polyhponie N°109

Youtube


Wascha mesa - it could be better, may not have time to record a better take during the holiday break

Youtube


El postillon de la rioja

Youtube
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Loiseng Kee
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Loiseng Kee » Sun Nov 22, 2015 12:01 am

Hi everyone,

Finally I have time to record and submit my works. Great job Eric, Havard, Tim, Chris and John. U guys are fantastic by getting ur recording done so fast. I am facing lots of hiccups during recordings, and this is my first time joining online learning, felt quite panic during recordings. Hope to learn from u all, I aware that is too many errors during El Pastillon, I might record it sometime again, pls feel free to comments!!!


Youtube


Youtube


Youtube


p/s: Attempt to catch up with my lesson 02 submission. wish me good luck!

Many Thanks.

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by John Montes » Sun Nov 22, 2015 2:51 am

Loiseng Kee wrote:Hi everyone,

Finally I have time to record and submit my works. Great job Eric, Havard, Tim, Chris and John. U guys are fantastic by getting ur recording done so fast. I am facing lots of hiccups during recordings, and this is my first time joining online learning, felt quite panic during recordings. Hope to learn from u all, I aware that is too many errors during El Pastillon, I might record it sometime again, pls feel free to comments!!!

p/s: Attempt to catch up with my lesson 02 submission. wish me good luck!

Many Thanks.
Hi Loiseng,
You did fine, the sound quality from what your using is very good. The room is providing a nice reverb. My recordings are in a carpeted room so its a little dry and no natural reverb.

Most of us have some little mistakes here and there in our recordings, we just strive to keep improving with focus and practice :-)
2001 Vicente Carrillo 1a Rio
1998 German Rubio Vazquez Estudio
2015 Cordoba Solista
2012 Cordoba C7
La Bella & D'Addario Strings

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John Montes
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Duplicate

Post by John Montes » Sun Nov 22, 2015 2:51 am

.
Last edited by John Montes on Tue Dec 01, 2015 3:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Duplicate
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La Bella & D'Addario Strings

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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by John Montes » Sun Nov 22, 2015 2:54 am

Posting version #2 of the Postillon de la Rioja, this version has improved interpretation of the notated rhythm in m7, m9, and m22

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2001 Vicente Carrillo 1a Rio
1998 German Rubio Vazquez Estudio
2015 Cordoba Solista
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