D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

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Salvatore Lovinello
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Salvatore Lovinello » Thu Dec 17, 2015 1:09 pm

Cao,

The problem with going off script is that these seemingly simple songs are meant to be technical exercises for both the left and right hand. While it may be possible and much easier to ignore the technical suggestions, in the long run, without building a solid technical foundation, future and more difficult music will take much longer to learn and may even be impossible to play. The technical aspect of classical guitar is why I'm here. I have learned to play much harder pieces on my own. Some take me months to learn (no teacher...). I'm tired of reinventing the wheel every time I fall in love with a song and want to learn it. I'm afraid of bad habits causing injury. My goal is to achieve the proficiency of the master guitarists. I may never get to that level, but, the journey it self is a worthy effort on its own.

I may not be submitting my assignment this month. My wife, the liturgical director of our church, has asked me to play two solos for the Christmas midnight mass. They are a jazz version of Away In a Manger arranged by Paul Pappas and I Surrender arranged by Rodrigo Rodriguez as well as all of the ensemble music I'm expected to play. Then we leave for the frigid north woods to spend a week with family. I think I'm allowed to miss two lessons?

Happy Holidays to all!

Sal

Cao Nguyen

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Cao Nguyen » Thu Dec 17, 2015 2:33 pm

Sal,

What I suggested is trying to understand and visualize the music before practicing the techniques needed for it. I find it easier to tackle the technical part if I can clearly visualize the desired goal in my mind. The brain should know what to do in advance before sending the command signals to the fingers. There are pure technical exercises - namely Cordes a Vides, Si Si Re, Scales and so on. The next lesson has more pure technical exercises.

For harder pieces with multiple voices, I first separate the melody line and practice it to be able to focus more on the musical part of the piece. Then follows the technical part.

Colin Bullock
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Colin Bullock » Fri Dec 18, 2015 2:33 pm

Cao Nguyen wrote: @everyone
...share some thoughts that I came up with recently when practicing that may be helpful to you.
Cao
I agree we should be thinking of the musicality of each piece right from the beginning.
For me it comes down to practicality and capability which means my approach to learning a piece is different.
For example, I never learnt music as a child so my sight reading is atrocious. Because of this I don't listen to anyone playing a piece before I have tried it a few times, then I check against Prof Delcamp's recording. So for me every piece is a sight reading exercise. It has disadvantages because I don't comment on other people's posts until I am more familiar with the piece, also I need to establish fingering, rhythm, damping, stop buzzes etc before being able to put in expresion.
But, you are right, the longer you leave putting in the musicality, the harder it is to insert later - like damping!
Cao Nguyen wrote: .... too much buzz when lifting the finger off the strings :(
I often get this on some strings. I have tried stopping it by not lifting the finger fully off the string, a sort of damping.

Excellent playing by the way

Cao Nguyen

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Cao Nguyen » Fri Dec 18, 2015 2:52 pm

Colin,

For sight reading I suggest practicing scales and vocalizing at the same time. The scales in Fernando Carulli's book Complete Method for Guitar are excellent. I've learned all the fingerboard by practicing scales. For rhythm you can try tapping or counting without playing.

We human have limited focusing capability (especially men), so I find it best to work on single aspects of playing before putting them all together.

David Florea
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by David Florea » Sat Dec 26, 2015 6:15 pm

Yes, Happy Holidays!

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Angela Zhao
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Angela Zhao » Tue Dec 29, 2015 11:22 am

Hi, Classmates,
Here is my study assignment:
cadet rousselle ,la cucaracha,lundi matin


Youtube




Youtube



Youtube

Charles Ramcharan
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Charles Ramcharan » Mon Jan 04, 2016 4:30 pm

Happy New Year to All,

This is my submission for Lesson 4

LA CUCARACHA

Youtube


CADET ROUSSELLE

Youtube


LUNDI MATIN

Youtube


ALOUETTE GENTILLE ALOUETTE

Youtube

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Angela Zhao
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Angela Zhao » Tue Jan 05, 2016 3:06 pm

Cao Nguyen wrote:Hi David,
I like the clear tone you produce. I see you're using staccato to add some expressions to the music as well, very good!

@everyone
A lot of you haven't posted your videos yet, so I want to share some thoughts that I came up with recently when practicing that may be helpful to you. From the previous lessons I have a feeling that we're focusing too much on the technical aspects of the pieces, i.e. where to place the fingers, when to pluck the strings, etc. Some of us can play very well but monotonously. We forget the final goal that we're trying to achieve - making music! Of course, we're beginners and the technical part is very important but I think it's not less important to practice playing musically. Here is my new approach to practicing a new piece:

1. Listen to Mr Delcamp's playing, acquiring the piece's name.
2. Search for the song on youtube, listen to other versions of it (vocal). At this stage most pieces are popular children's song. This step widens our perception of the song to allow us express it more freely, instead of limiting ourselves to the guitar version of Mr Delcamp.
3. Search for the lyrics if available. Translate and try to understand the meaning, and the deeper meaning if exists, of the lyrics. Read other information about the song - the composer, the circumstance in which the song was composed, etc. The song La Cucaracha has some interesting stories about it.
4. Listen to one favorite version of the piece, memorize the melody and sing a long. Take notes of where I want to put it louder, quieter, where to sing the notes together (legato) and where to cut them prematurely (staccato), etc. Write them down on the score.
5. With a clear melody in mind, approach the guitar and try to reproduce it at the actual speed with all the dynamics noted above. You need to play fast enough in order to feel the flow of the music. Play it several times, don't care about fingering, damping or some slips that may occur. Play free strokes if it's more comfortable.
6. Slow down, practice with a metronome. Adjust the fingering, the rhythm, damping, string crossing and other technicalities according to the score while maintaining and polishing the musicality of the piece. Memorize all the technical details. Speed up to the desired tempo. I practice in front of my laptop screen with the webcam opened to adjust my hands and posture.
7. Practice more until it becomes muscle memory.
8. Find a quiet free time ( :( ) to record and submit the recordings.


Thanks to everyone for the positive comments. My playing still needs to be polished more. My left hand staccato at high speed produces too much buzz when lifting the finger off the strings :(. I haven't practiced right hand staccato yet.

Happy practicing :bye:.

Hello Cao Nguyen

I'm fully agree with you, we play the music, every notes play from your heart,somtimes we hinder in the technical,nervous,etc. but nothing can stop we pursuit the perfect sound. :merci:

Colin Bullock
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Colin Bullock » Wed Jan 06, 2016 5:32 pm

Charles Ramcharan wrote:Happy New Year to All,

This is my submission for Lesson 4
These all sound good and confident.
In Alouette bar 5 do i detect a lilt to the first 4 notes (and some others) rather than even spacing?
Some folks will advise you to keep your thumb behind centre of neck to allow the fingers better access to the bass notes, worth experimenting,

Happy New year

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Warley Lima
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Warley Lima » Mon Jan 11, 2016 12:59 am

Hello friends good night, I am sending the class files four. Happy new year to everyone.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Regards,

Warley Lima

Steven Galvin

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Steven Galvin » Fri Jan 15, 2016 1:01 pm

Good work everyone - between Christmas and moving home I am a bit behind with lesson 04 but hope to have them before end of the month.

Thanks

Colin Bullock
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Colin Bullock » Sun Jan 17, 2016 5:25 pm

Warley Lima wrote:Hello friends good night, I am sending the class files four. Happy new year to everyone.
Well played. All clear and good tone.
In Cucaracha have a look at the timing of 1st note of 2nd bar, it sounds like a 1/8 note to me

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Angela Zhao
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Angela Zhao » Thu Jan 21, 2016 3:01 pm

Hi, Classmates,
Here is my study assignment "ALOUETTE,GENTILLE ALOUETTE" video link.
Youtube


:merci:

Juan Silva

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Juan Silva » Mon Feb 01, 2016 4:16 am

Hello classmates. I am running into a bit of confusion with the theory portion. Please refer to La Cucaracha on page 21. Also, when I say"space" vs. "line" in the below, I am making reference to the "Every Good Boy Does Fine, and the F A C E" acronyms.

On the scale at the top of the page, the "F" on the 4th string is identified as a sharp. This is also coincidentally the F "space". I am pretty clear there.

The confusion for me arises when the F sharp is identified on the F "line" at the beginning by the time signature. When we come to the 5th measure, the F is a sharp (as pointed by the 4th finger notation, by the scale at the top of the page, and by the proper tone it produces). So... we are hitting a F# on the 4th string throughout the piece.

Why is the sharp symbol placed on the F "line" rather than the F "space" by the signature? Is this normal and I just don't know it? If there were more F's on any given piece, are we to assume that all will be sharp no matter what string they are on?

Thanks,
Juan
:discussion:

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Zafar Haq
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Zafar Haq » Mon Feb 01, 2016 5:42 am

Hi, Juan Silva,
Sharp symbol placed before a time signature is a standard practice.It tells to the player that "F" note to be treated as " #F".Instead of placing # symbol beside every F note.To keep the piece clean,it is placed just next to time signature once.It also tells the key signature.G major scale have a #F in it.(G,A,B,C,D,E,#F,G).I kept it simple to explain so you prepare,practice this study assignment playing F as F# where it is notated on the music sheet.
In measures 5,11,13,you were told to use left hand finger 4 (Pinky) to play it "#F".
In the same study assignment " B" note to be played with 4th left hand finger e.g measures 7 and 9 on G string.

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