D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Mon Nov 30, 2015 10:21 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D04.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.


Today, we're going to work on a series of exercises.
- page 113, numbers 14, 15, 16 - Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES – ESCALAS
When changes of position are needed, you will be using the "position shift" technique. Position I is the left hand position where the index finger (1) is placed behind the 1st fret, position V is the hand position where the index (1) is placed behind the fifth fret, etc. The position shift involves moving the left hand along the neck, from position to position, from fret to fret. In the scales we're looking at today, notice that my first finger never leaves the first string, I use it as a guide for my hand. Position shifts are shown by oblique lines linking two fingering indications given for the same finger.
The following videos are for numbers 14, 15, 16 on page 113. Concentrate your practice on the passages highlighted in yellow, and do your best to perfect the position shift technique.

Youtube


Youtube


Youtube





Finally, we'll look at 4 pieces, pages 26, 62, 63, 76, 77 et 98.

- page 26 Anonyme Scarborough Fair
The phrase structure is of 4 bars. (Phrase structure is the division of the larger musical phrase into parts of equal length, with the most common division being into sections of 4 bars. This division is linked not only to walking, but also to dance, poetry and singing.) Here we have an English tune dating from the end of the Middle Ages. The accompaniment in eighth notes (quavers) gives a fluidity to the whole. It's enough to accentuate the notes of the melody slightly for "Scarborough Fair" to evoke a feeling of space and peace. I think this piece has strong therapeutic powers both for us playing it and for those listening.

Youtube



- page 62, 63 Giuliani, Mauro Etude opus 51 n°12
In this arpeggio study, the melody is in the bass. The index and middle finger play the accompaniment on strings 1 and 2, while the thumb plays the melody on strings 3, 4, 5 and 6.
The point of this study is to seek to keep the index and middle finger strokes of equal strength throughout, whether the distance between them and the thumb is small (when the thumb is playing string 3) or large (when the thumb is playing string 6).
From bar 20 onwards, the instruction sf (sforzando, sforzato, sf, sfz ) means that you should give a sudden, strong emphasis to the note immediately above the instruction.
In bar 22, I use a hinged barré (indicated by a dotted line instead of a solid line) to play the D and A on the open strings, and I don't apply the full barré until the third beat of the bar, to play the bass Bb.
Mauro Giuliani is the first teacher to have published a systematic study of arpeggios ( http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... liani.html : Opus. 1 - Studio per la chitarra, Prima parte : 120 arpeggi). I recommend that you practise a few arpeggios each day and change them regularly with the aim of studying all of them in two years. You can listen to the mp3s of the 120 arpeggios recorded by Marco Cairone here: http://www.chitarraclassicadelcamp.com/ ... 32&t=25253 .

Youtube



- page 76, 77 Paganini, Niccolò Ghiribizzo n°24
Ghiribizzo n°24 is in two sections, each of 20 bars. It has a phrase structure of 4 bars. In the second section, Paganini repeats the melody of the first section an octave higher. The piece is in the key of A, and this key allows the optimal use of the 3 bass strings of the guitar: E (dominant), A (tonic), D (subdominant). Observe the exact duration of the bass notes, and damp them by placing your thumb on the string as and where indicated by the damping symbols and finger indications on the first line.

Youtube



- page 98 Delcamp, Jean-François Novelette n°3, à Alexandra
This piece is divided into two sections, like Paganini's Ghiribizzo n°24. In the first section, the melody in the bass is played by the thumb. In bars 10 and 12, to conclude the first section, I use the whole tone scale (F G A B C# D# F). In bar 16, the melody passes to the treble notes, while the thumb repeats the tonic (E) until the end. The harmonics in bar 23 are played by very lightly touching strings 1 and 3 exactly over fret XII.

Youtube




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 113 number 14, Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES - ESCALAS
- page 26 Anonyme Scarborough Fair
- page 76, 77 Paganini, Niccolò Ghiribizzo n°24
- page 98 Delcamp, Jean-François Novelette n°3, à Alexandra


Good luck!

I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.

Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES - ESCALAS
Scarborough Fair
Ghiribizzo n°24
Novelette n°3, à Alexandra

Rick Beauregard
GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES - ESCALAS
Scarborough Fair
Ghiribizzo n°24
Novelette n°3, à Alexandra

Duang Turongratanachai
GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES - ESCALAS
Scarborough Fair
Novelette n°3, à Alexandra

Haris Karachristianidis
GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES - ESCALAS
Scarborough Fair
Ghiribizzo n°24
Novelette n°3, à Alexandra

CarlWestman
GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES - ESCALAS
Scarborough Fair
Ghiribizzo n°24
Novelette n°3, à Alexandra
:( + ♫ = :)

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Rick Beauregard » Mon Nov 30, 2015 9:03 pm

Kind of quiet in D04 English Forum these days. I've been going over to the Spanish Forum for a little more interaction. I like how they post early editions, or parts of pieces, then later efforts, to show improvements and get some early critique to catch any issues.

Another great bunch of pieces! I started working on these in September. I've recorded Scarborough Faire, below, and will submit an updated version, maybe fewer mistakes and a little more in tune, and I may move the capo down a couple frets. As Maestro Delcamp says, this piece is "therapeutic." I love playing this piece.

I also love this third in a series of Novelettes by Prof. Delcamp. With the other two, they make a very nice trio of little pieces, and not too difficult to play.

The Ghiribizzo No 24 is another matter. I think, like some of you do, these Paganini pieces are a struggle for me. I don't particularly care for them, at least until I have them down pretty well. I haven't made much if any progress on this or on the Giuliani Etude, though I have put more time into the latter.

Here's my Scarborough Faire. I've made a couple little fingering changes. In measure 9, instead of using 3 on the first note C, I slide 2 up from B to C. Then the last note in the measure, G, I play with 3 instead of 4. Also, in measure 16, on the last two notes, the 16th notes, I add the fifth E and B as in the following measure. I just like this harmony and it's right there east to pick up. Reminds me of the Simon & Garfunkel version.

Hope everyone is well. Enjoy!


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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Haris Karachristianidis » Tue Dec 01, 2015 3:33 pm

Rick, Spanish forum is great if you have time. The members are very friendly and helpful. Some of them are very good guitar players. The problem for me was time and language. You will get great comments for your videos, but you also have to comment on their videos. And that requires a lot of time if you do it with the online translators.. I participated 2 years but because of the reasons above I did not this year. I hope you will find time for it, it will help you a lot! Please give my greetings to the Spanish forum!

I listened to the pieces of this lesson and I think I do not like them, maybe I will skip this lesson.

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Rick Beauregard » Tue Dec 01, 2015 7:12 pm

Yes the extra translation step takes time. And they have so many participants, which is great. I think I will just go there occasionally to pick up additional tips. Their participants are very strong in theory, which is helpful to me too.

I am surprised you don't like these pieces, at least Scarborough Faire. Maybe I like it because I am so familiar with the tune from the 70's version by Simon & Garfunkel. I get it for the others. Though I really enjoy Delcamp's pieces as short examples of a more contemporary style, with a bit of dissonance but not too much.

By the way, I switched my rectified strings. The noise was starting to get to me. My fingers stick to them more and make noise when I lift off. I'm playing LaBalla low tensions now and I like them. We'll see if they last as long as the rectified ones did in terms of tone.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by CarlWestman » Thu Dec 03, 2015 3:40 am

Rick, I apologize, I'm some of the reason that the English forum is quiet. As I posted earlier, I hope that is remedied in the new year; there's some reason to hope, but some new clouds on the horizon as well. Hard to tell how quickly they will come this way.

I am thrilled that Scarborough Fair is one of the pieces. I love early music ... and stuff that sounds like it, like Bretonneuse from Lesson 1. I note the capo on the 5th fret; this suggests that it may be particularly enjoyable to play on my Yamaha Guitalele, which would have the same tuning (but still shorter effective scale length ... it's tuned as a guitar with a 5th fret capo, but the scale is more like a 7th fret capo, so the frets on the Guitalele are pretty close together, and that can be as challenging as having them far apart).

The Novelette sounds interesting ... I think I will like it.

Paganini again ... it sounds OK. I prefer the Giuliani piece, but not by a ton.

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Haris Karachristianidis » Thu Dec 03, 2015 1:56 pm

Rick Beauregard wrote: By the way, I switched my rectified strings. The noise was starting to get to me. My fingers stick to them more and make noise when I lift off. I'm playing LaBalla low tensions now and I like them. We'll see if they last as long as the rectified ones did in terms of tone.
I hate rectified strings.. I tried again rectified, La Bella this time and could only stand them 2 days. This extra left and right hand noise was unbearable..

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by CarlWestman » Thu Dec 03, 2015 6:20 pm

just an update - I've posted to D04 Lesson 3.

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Rick Beauregard » Thu Dec 03, 2015 6:35 pm

CarlWestman wrote:Rick, I apologize
No need to apologize Carl. I think the main thing is we don't have many participants in D04 this year, so it is kind of quiet. They have, like 12 in the Spanish forum. The nice thing is, in spite of our respective tribulations keeping us from practicing, the forum provides just a little kick in the ass to keep playing.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Rick Beauregard » Thu Dec 03, 2015 7:20 pm

CarlWestman wrote:I am thrilled that Scarborough Fair is one of the pieces. ... this suggests that it may be particularly enjoyable to play on my Yamaha Guitalele, which would have the same tuning (but still shorter effective scale length ...
I look forward to hearing it played on the Guitalele! I tried moving the capo a couple frets down, and playing with out capo, but it not the same.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
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_/)

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by CarlWestman » Sat Dec 05, 2015 12:49 am

OK, I started practice today and already have a couple questions.

For Scarborough Fair, it appears (correct me if I'm wrong) that the sheet music is written in such a way that we play the notes "as if" the capo were the nut of a guitar tuned E-E. Thus, the very first note of the piece is an A, which we play as if we had a regular guitar (open 5th string). Of course, with the capo, it's going to sound like D. But that's how we're supposed to play it, right?

See, I was looking all around the fretboard for A, E, G, F#, etc., based on A-A tuning. So instead of playing 5th string open and then first open, I played 6th string open and then 2nd string open. It didn't sound right. Once I had a hunch that we were to play it "as if" the capo were the nut, things started to sound right. Looking at the video, I think it must be correct. But I want to check.

NEXT:
I'm a bit puzzled by the sheet music on the scales. Usually with scales, one plays the same notes going up the scale as down. So take #14 for instance. You have F# and G# indicated as you are ascending. But you don't have them indicated as you descend; in fact, the suggested fingering is different, implying that indeed, it's not supposed to be all the same notes both ways. Isn't that something a little different than a normal A minor scale?

UPDATE: I just checked some notes I have from a fundamentals of music class from several years ago. "A minor" scale has no sharps or flats. So why are there sharps played for F and G on the ascending part? Oh wait - the ascending is melodic minor, but the descending is natural minor? And ... a little googling, and it appears this combination is called is "A melodic minor scale in just intonation". Well I never would have guessed. I don't think we got quite that far in the course.

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sat Dec 05, 2015 10:00 am

Carl, regarding the capo question, you are correct. Whenever you use the capo, you will pretend still to have EADGBE tuning, although depending on the capo position your tuning is a different one. The musical notation is always written assuming no use of capo, and capo will just transpose the piece to a different key, in this case from A minor into D minor. So yes, you play as if the capo was the nut.
CarlWestman wrote:And ... a little googling, and it appears this combination is called is "A melodic minor scale in just intonation". Well I never would have guessed. I don't think we got quite that far in the course.
I don't think just intonation has anything to do with this. A melodic minor scale will have the 6th and 7th notes sharpened when ascending, and not sharpened when descending.
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by CarlWestman » Sun Dec 06, 2015 1:12 am

Thanks, Marko!

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Haris Karachristianidis » Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:27 pm

Rick, your Scarborough Fair is really beautiful! Great coloring as always! You have really mastered that piece! :casque:

:bravo:


I think I will not skip this lesson. :)
I liked Novelette although I am not a fan of more modern music, I loved Scarborough Fair after I heard you version Rick, Paganini is always a techical challenge as is Giuliani regarding arpegios. Also I like some parts in Giuliani's piece.

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Rick Beauregard » Tue Dec 08, 2015 6:49 pm

Thanks Haris. I love that piece. I too am not a contemporary guitar composition fan, I hate the dissonance or when it sounds like random strumming and plucking noise more than music. But Prof Delcamp's pieces I find more lyrical and harmonic, with just a bit of tastefully placed dissonance. More like Eric Satie than... well I don't really know any of these composers. Maybe I should give them a chance.

Here is my exercise:


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All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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Haris Karachristianidis
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Haris Karachristianidis » Wed Dec 09, 2015 2:43 pm

Rick your scale is very good! You play it fluently and you make all these shifts without intrruptions or rhythm slowdowns. Also you have your thumb on E, so right hand is stable and there are no E resonances.

:bravo:



I wonder what kind of string prof Delcamp uses: In Novelette the notes played on G string sound quite vibrant/metallic in contrast to my d'Addario EJ43 that sound more lifeless and duller. Carbon strings maybe?

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