D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby Jean-François Delcamp » Mon Feb 01, 2016 5:59 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D05.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



Now we are going to work on a series of exercises:
- page 131 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) EXTENSIONS
Play this left-hand exercise trying to leave your fingers in place on the strings as long as you can, as I show you in the following video. If the stretches between your fingers feel too much for you, you can make it easier for the left hand by using a capo so that you play on the higher frets which are closer together and your fingers will not have to stretch so far apart. Avoid bending your left wrist, as this not only hurts, but also hinders the mobility of your fingers. Aim for the position (of the guitar neck, your elbow and your shoulder) which will allow you to play without bending your left wrist, as shown in the following video. You will be able to play this exercise more effectively if you place your left thumb below your ring finger, i.e. below the third fret.

Youtube



- page 148 Degli arpeggi 48-98
Mauro Giuliani is the first teacher to have published a systematic study of arpeggios ( http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... liani.html : Opus. 1 - Studio per la chitarra, Prima parte : 120 arpeggi). I recommend that you practise a few arpeggios each day and change them regularly with the aim of studying all of them in two years. You can listen to the mp3s of the 120 arpeggios recorded by Marco Cairone here: http://www.chitarraclassicadelcamp.com/ ... 32&t=25253 .


Don't forget, thoughout the year, to work on scales (pages 136 to 142) several times per week.
Page 142, I suggest some varied rhythms which will help you to achieve greater speed.




Today we'll look at 5 pieces.
- page 12 Giulio Cesare Barbetta (ca. 1540-1603) Moresca detta le Canarie
The first part of the dance is based on a prolonged repetition of a B in the bass. This absence of movement in the bass note makes the first part easy to play. The bass in the second half is enriched at first by a new E, then by more and more notes, until eventually going through the whole scale in eighth notes (quavers) to finish. The second part is more difficult technically, in particular bars 30 to 32.

Youtube



- page 41 François Campion (1680-1748) Gigue en ré majeur
This gigue was published as a tablature in a work entitled "Nouvelles découvertes ..." (New discoveries ...). It is in the "French tablature" form, where letters of the alphabet indicate the frets where the fingers are to be placed on the neck. The 5 lines of the tablature correspond to the 5 strings of the baroque guitar.
In the following 2 videos, I play the gigue in its original version on baroque guitar, then the classical guitar version.

Youtube


Youtube



- page 83 Napoléon Coste (1806-1883) Leçon XXIV
The first phrase ends in bar 4 with a half cadence, then a run of sixteenth notes (semiquavers) leads us to a repetition of the first phrase which concludes with a perfect cadence in D minor. The melody in the second part, more fluid, is based on a constant flow of sixteenth notes (semiquavers). This second part ends with a pedal note (a sustained bass note) on the dominant (A) whose role is to prepare us to take pleasure in returning to the theme of the first part, in D minor, which ends the work.

Youtube



- page 84 Juliàn Arcas (1832-1882) Manuelito, waltz
Manuelito, to whom this waltz is dedicated, is the brother of Juliàn Arcas. After an introduction in octaves, the waltz starts in bar 16. The rhythm in triple time is by then well established. From bar 33 onwards, hemiolas abound and the 3/4 rhythm changes into a more exuberant 3/2 rhythm. Juliàn Arcas makes clear his aim to maintain a lightness by the use of fluid arpeggios (bars 53-56 and 61-63).

Youtube



- page 14 Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Leccione III n°7 Las Terceras Lecciones De Guitarra
A study in arpeggios in A minor, where free stroke and rest stroke are mixed.

Youtube





I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 84 Juliàn Arcas (1832-1882) Manuelito, waltz
- page 14 Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Leccione III n°7 Las Terceras Lecciones De Guitarra




Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François


Exam qualifying submissions: :
Juliàn Arcas (1832-1882) Manuelito, waltz
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°7

Loiseng Kee
Juliàn Arcas (1832-1882) Manuelito, waltz
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°7

Eric de Vries
Juliàn Arcas (1832-1882) Manuelito, waltz
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°7

John Montes
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°7
Juliàn Arcas (1832-1882) Manuelito, waltz

Satyajit Kadle
Juliàn Arcas (1832-1882) Manuelito, waltz
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°7

Håvard.Bergene
Juliàn Arcas (1832-1882) Manuelito, waltz
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°7
:( + ♫ = :)

EricKatz
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby EricKatz » Tue Feb 02, 2016 11:01 am

Hi fellow students,

I gathered some background information about the pieces of this lesson that I like to share with you!

Giulio Cesare Barbetta (ca. 1540-1603) Moresca detta le Canarie
Giulio Cesare Barbetta was an Italian lutenist and composer, born in Padova. He published four lute-books and one didactical work. He was the first to publish music for the seven-course lute. His compositions mainly consist of dances.
The piece in this lesson is from his third book: "Intavolatura de liuto", published in Venice (as most of his works) in 1585.
Moresca detta le Canarie means "Moresca (a moorish dance) called the Canary". Moresca is a 15th/16th century pantomime dance in which the executants wore Moorish costumes. The Canary dance (Canarie in French) was a Renaissance dance popular all over Europe in the late 16th and early 17th century.
Canary originally referred to the island of Gran Canaria on the west coast of Africa, and the group of surrounding islands (the Canary Islands).

François Campion (1685-1747) Gigue (in D major)
Francis Campion is generally considered the most important French baroque guitarist after Robert de Visée. He was born around 1685 in Rouen, and died in Paris, 21 Oct 1747. In 1704 he became guitarist and theorbo player in the orchestra of the Académie Royale de Musique. He held this position until 1719, also teaching the guitar and theorbo in Paris.
His "Nouvelles Découvertes sur la Guitarre" was published in Paris in 1705. This book (45 pages) contains 70 pieces for 5-course baroque guitar, all dances.
During his live, Campion added a whole lot of pieces in manuscript, so his own copy of the book given by his nephew to the Bibliotheque Royale in 1748 has about 112 pages.
The "new discoveries" referred to in the title are a series of seven scordatura tunings. Scordatura (literally Italian for "mistuning") is a tuning of a stringed instrument different from the normal, standard tuning. It typically attempts to allow special effects or unusual chords or timbre, or to make certain passages easier to play. Because the music in "Nouvelles Découvertes sur la Guitarre" is notated in tablature, playing in any scordatura tuning is as easy as playing in the normal tuning.
The scordatura pieces occupy about three quarters of the book. The first scordatura tuning is Bb D G C F. So the 5th, 2nd and 1th strings are tuned up one semi-tone. The Prelude à 4 temps (lesson 2) is written for this specific tuning. [Note that Mr. Delcamp has revised the piece, using the standard tuning].
and are followed by pieces in the normal tuning.
Last years "Prelude" (D04,p.35) and the Gigue in this lesson use the normal tuning (A D G B E). You can easily recognize that this piece was written for 5 course baroque guitar, because there's no lower bass note than the A with two ledger lines.
The gigue on p.41 is a lively baroque dance originating from the British jig. It was imported into France in the mid-17th century. A gigue is usually in 3/8 or in one of its compound metre derivatives, such as 6/8, 6/4, 9/8 or 12/8. Like other Baroque dances, it consists of two sections. A gigue usually appears at the end of a suite.

Napoléon Coste (1805-1883) Leçon XXIV
From his birth certificate we now know that Coste was born on June 27th 1805. There's been a lot of confusion about his birth date (even Coste himself thought he was born 28th of June 1806), because Napoléon (the Emperor) had introduced a different way to name the calendar years. So Coste was born on the 8th Messidor of the 13th year of the Republic. His was baptised Claude Antoine Jean George Napoléon Coste. The last name being a tribute to the Emperor by Coste's father, an army officer himself.
In the D05-lesson book you will find four pieces by Napoléon Coste.
From Op.38 "25 études de genre pour la guitare":
- Etude I (p.82), to be studied in D05-lesson 7
- Etude II (p.78-79), optional
From "Méthode complète pour la guitare par Ferdinand Sor, redigée et augmentée de nombreux exemples par N. Coste":
- Etude 13 (p.80-81), optional
- Leçon 24 (p.83), to be studied in D05-lesson 6.
Sor's own "Méthode complète pour la Guitare" was originally published in 1830.
After his death an extended edition was made by Coste, who had been a student of him: "Méthode complète pour la guitare par Ferdinand Sor, redigée et augmentée de nombreux exemples par N. Coste", published around 1851 (no opus-number). Coste incorporated new exercises and lessons that he had made himself. An example of this is Leçon 24 Andante (p.12).
Coste added an appendix about the 7th string ("Appendice par N. Coste. Septième corde", p.45-51), which contains some exercises and studies. One of those is Etude 13 (on p.49 of the original edition) originally meant as a study for 7-string guitar! The D's in m.5 and m.10, and the second D's in 12 and 14 should all be played on the 7th string (=D).
Rather surprising is the next addition: "Six pièces extraites du livre publié en 1686 et dédié à S.M. Louis XIV par Robert de Visée" (p.51-52).
The third addition by Coste is a selection of Sor's studies, called "26 Etudes pour la guitare par Ferdinand Sor. Revues classées et doigtées d'ápres les traditions de l'auteur par N. Coste" (p.53-85). The famous Sor compilation by Segovia (Twenty studies for the Guitar, first published in 1945) may look like a carefull personal selection out of 120 studies by Sor, but 16 of the 20 selected works were already present in the selection by Coste.

Juliàn Arcas (1832-1882) Manuelito, waltz
According to the lesson book, this waltz is dedicated to Manuelito, the brother of Juliàn Arcas. Although Juliàn indeed had a brother named Manuel, the title and dedicatory explicitly refer to Don Manuel D. Gimenez, one of Arcas' close friends.
The Soneto-edition of Arcas' complete works provides an interesting analysis of this waltz. "Written in the key of A major, its conclusion in D major leads us to understand that either we should return to the beginning of the waltz, or that a continuation may have existed at one time, which has since been lost. It is comprised of a brief introduction and three melodic sections, the first with an non-conclusive end, dynamically speaking. The second section has two parts, the second of these being a slight variation on the first. This section is conclusive, however, and could constitute the END of the waltz, if we opt to return to D.C. The third section, in D major, is a bridge or pass towards a continuation or return to the beginning."
The uppernote of the second beat in m.67 and m.75 should be an e-sharp.

Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°7
Sagreras introduces this Study 7 with no more than one short sentence:"This practice study is very usefull, especially for the right hand." Although Mr. Delcamp uses a lot of rubato, his bpm is around 96 bpm.
The fingering in the third group of m.1 should be a-m-i-m.
Last edited by Marko Räsänen on Fri Mar 18, 2016 12:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Edited information on "Manuelito" (author's request)

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby Marko Räsänen » Tue Feb 02, 2016 12:51 pm

Thank you very much, Eric!

Eric de Vries wrote:The Canary dance (Canarie in French) was a Renaissance dance popular all over Europe in the late 16th and early 17th century.


And this later evolved into Chicken Dance, right? :mrgreen: :desole:
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby Loiseng Kee » Sat Feb 06, 2016 8:10 am

Thank you Eric!!!!
Here is my submission. My right hand ring finger seems injured, so might stop playing for at least a month. Wish u all a enjoyable guitar playing lesson 6.



Youtube



Youtube

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby Mark Bacon » Wed Feb 10, 2016 10:21 pm

D5,

Hi all! Though not participating this year I've still been watching you all progress through these pieces. I've a question about the Arcas waltz. Mr DelCamp says that the piece changes to 3/2 and contains a bunch of hemiolas starting at measure 33. I don't see an indication of either in the score.

Thanks!

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby John Montes » Thu Feb 11, 2016 3:50 am

Hi Loiseng, the recordings sound pretty good. Definitely rest the right hand if you have an injury.

I may be a little bit late posting recordings for this month, have been pretty busy and have not have a chance to practice or start working on L6 pieces.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby John Montes » Thu Feb 11, 2016 3:54 am

Mark Bacon wrote:D5,

Hi all! Though not participating this year I've still been watching you all progress through these pieces. I've a question about the Arcas waltz. Mr DelCamp says that the piece changes to 3/2 and contains a bunch of hemiolas starting at measure 33. I don't see an indication of either in the score.

Thanks!

Hey Mark, its been awhile, welcome back. Would you like to join the students group? You always have some great feedback.

Re: Hemiola's, your right, I don't see the markings in the mentioned sections of Manuelito. There are other pieces in the D05 workbook that do have the markings such as the Guardame las vacas.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby EricKatz » Thu Feb 11, 2016 7:44 am

There are no markings, but it's clear that when you take those 1/4 notes together with a bow (across the bars), the (main) beat consists of 1/2 notes. The 1-2-3 from the waltz is now spread over two bars.
Last edited by EricKatz on Thu Feb 11, 2016 8:06 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby EricKatz » Thu Feb 11, 2016 8:05 am

Loiseng Kee wrote:My right hand ring finger seems injured, so might stop playing for at least a month.


Hi Loiseng,

Sorry to hear about your RH ring finger. What's the matter? Too much exercises or a cut or something?
All the best in recovering! It won't be easy to stay away from the guitar! Maybe you can play some easy Sor or Guiliani exercises (they didn't use the a-finger in those times). Also a good idea is to listen to guitar music while reading the score. You can find a lot of free scores at IMSLP.

Your Sagreras is played well, certainly when posted within one week. Although the piece sounds better with rubato, I would advise to pay attention to the most regular arpeggio you can produce. Every note with the same duration and the same volume. You tend to let the first (bass) note ring a little bit longer then 1/16.

Manuelito: very good. It really has swing!
M.33-65: the rhytmic pattern changes here. The 1-2-3 from the waltz is now spread over two bars. Bring it out!
BTW, do you play with a elastic band around a-finger and pinky??

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby Loiseng Kee » Fri Feb 12, 2016 1:06 am

Eric de Vries wrote:
Loiseng Kee wrote:My right hand ring finger seems injured, so might stop playing for at least a month.


Hi Loiseng,

Sorry to hear about your RH ring finger. What's the matter? Too much exercises or a cut or something?
All the best in recovering! It won't be easy to stay away from the guitar! Maybe you can play some easy Sor or Guiliani exercises (they didn't use the a-finger in those times). Also a good idea is to listen to guitar music while reading the score. You can find a lot
BTW, do you play with a elastic band around a-finger and pinky??


Dear Eric,

Thanks for ur concerns, advise n compliments. I discovered my right hand ring finger become less strength n not so controllable about a month ago, since I start to lost my tremolo skill which I was able to in the past 20 years. I am not sure the cause yet, but i can felt slight stiffness n pain when i stretch my a finger and pinky. Yes. I am using a elastic band to keep my pinky to stick with my a fingers, because it keep tuck out while i am playing Manuelito, especially m33 to 65. All these happened within these 2 month, I am pretty confused n think of rest for a while first, see whether will recovered by itself.

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby EricKatz » Mon Feb 29, 2016 8:54 pm

Started a little bit too late to make recordings, wanting to finish them before lesson 7 will be published. Except for Sagreras which was recorded some day earlier, these are my best takes of today, full of errors. So be it.
Comments are very welcome, as usual.

Juliàn Arcas (1832-1882) Manuelito, waltz

Youtube


Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°7

Youtube


Giulio Cesare Barbetta (ca. 1540-1603) Moresca detta le Canarie

Youtube


François Campion (1680-1748) Gigue en ré majeur

Youtube


Napoléon Coste (1805-1883) Leçon XXIV

Youtube

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby John Montes » Tue Mar 01, 2016 2:45 am

Nicely done Eric, thanks for doing the extra 2 pieces in addition to the Manuelito and Sagreras, they're all nice :bravo:

Hope I can get some recordings uploaded by the weekend.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby John Montes » Tue Mar 08, 2016 6:32 am

Here's the Sagreras piece, there's room for improvement :-)

Youtube
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Loiseng Kee
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby Loiseng Kee » Tue Mar 08, 2016 8:21 am

:bravo: Eric n John. U guys maintain a very nice n constsnt speed fir Sagreras.
:bravo: :bravo:
For Eric's Arcas, also interpleted in a very graceful walt manner. I love all.
See u guys in lesson 7 :bye:

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 06

Postby John Montes » Fri Mar 18, 2016 4:26 am

Here's an early cut of Manuelito and Coste's Lesson XXiV

Arcas - Manuelito

Youtube


Coste - Lesson xxiv

Youtube
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