D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Mar 30, 2016 10:43 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D04.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



Today, we're going to work on a series of exercises.
- pages 118 Delcamp, Jean-François Scales n°27 and 28
For n° 28, try to find the best compromise between playing without any finger noise and playing legato. Bars 4, 5 and 6 don't present this type of difficulty, as the fingers can slide along the nylon strings without any noise.

Youtube


Youtube




Finally we'll look at 3 pieces.
- page 25 Anonyme, Oscar Chilesotti Se io m'accorgo ben
As in scale n°28, the main difficulty is to achieve legato playing. For the dynamics, start the first bar with a crescendo, then in the second bar play a decrescendo. Then continue using crescendo and decrescendo to match the melody. When the melody goes up, play a crescendo. When it goes down, play a decrescendo.

Youtube



- page 82, 83 Strauss, Johann Lockvögel, valse opus 118
After the forte in the first two beats (which gets the attention of the listener), Johann Strauss uses the piano dynamic to maintain and sharpen the listener's attention. The valse (waltz) gets into its true rhythm from bar 4. From this bar onwards the rest of the piece has a 4-bar phrase structure.

Youtube



- page 96, 97 Anonyme Mi Favorita
The first 3 bars are an introduction which serves to establish the rhythm and key of the piece. The (soft) accompaniment makes its entry in bar 4. The accompaniment is on its own from the first beat of bar 4 to the second beat of bar 5, in order to create a sense of expectation which will heighten the receptivity of the listener and prepare him for the imminent arrival of the melody. I advise you to play these two bars of accompaniment with a metronome. That will allow the melody (which starts with an upbeat at the end of bar 5) to display a free quality (a rubato) which will appear to have all the more character for having followed on from the strictness of bars 4 and 5. The contrast between strict rhythm and free rhythm will give savour and character to the beginning of this mazurka. Later there are many repetitions (bars 10-11, bars 14-15); vary the articulation (legato, staccato) and vary the tone colour (over the soundhole, towards the bridge, towards the neck).
After that, nothing else of significance happens, except for the modulation into G major.

Youtube




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 82, 83 Strauss, Johann Lockvögel, valse opus 118
- page 96, 97 Anonyme Mi Favorita


Good luck!

I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.

Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

valse opus 118
Mi Favorita

Rick Beauregard
Mi Favorita
valse opus 118

CarlWestman
Mi Favorita
valse opus 118

Haris Karachristianidis
Mi Favorita
valse opus 118
:( + ♫ = :)

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Rick Beauregard » Thu Mar 31, 2016 10:07 pm

Thanks JFD for another challenging lesson. I am doing my best to keep up this year after starting so late last year (April I think).

This lesson has one of my favorite pieces and one I've been playing for maybe 30 years, Se Io M'accorgo, the Fred Noad version in his Book 1. Not too many differences, so it should be easy for me to re-learn it and add it to my rep again.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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CarlWestman
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by CarlWestman » Fri Apr 01, 2016 12:07 pm

Mi Favorita is very pleasing to play and hear as well, though it almost has an overly familiar sound - like it's the Stairway to Heaven of CG pieces.

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CarlWestman
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by CarlWestman » Fri Apr 08, 2016 12:24 pm

Rick (et al),

How is it going for you? I still enjoy Mi Favorita very much - the speed is coming along, but then I can get a bit crossed up if I go too fast. Oddly, I can get crossed up if I go too slow too! Gotta find that happy medium. There is one bit of difficulty I'm having and that is with not accidentally muting the E with the corner of my palm in measure 20. It's just they way my hand holds the neck, and it's hard to move it out of the way. So far I have found some relief by trying to hold the guitar as vertical as possible, not in the sense of pointing the neck to the ceiling, but in the sense that I cannot really see the separate strings by glancing down. The face of the guitar is thus almost parallel in plane with the side wall. That seems to help, but I can't quite play the whole thing that way, not yet anyway.

With respect to Strauss' waltz, boy that's a toughie. It's strange on a number of levels, but after the first repeat is done and you go into the section with all the slurs, I have no melodic sense for it at all. As I practice the patterns and get a little better at remembering what comes next and actually executing the notes, there's just no musicality to it at all. Not just my playing (which is a given in this case at the very least) but the waltz itself - there's nothing cohesive about it in my head. Again, not yet anyway. So it's a toughie.

That's the update from Southeast Tennessee.

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Rick Beauregard » Fri Apr 08, 2016 4:39 pm

Hey, Carl. Sorry to hear about your man Merle Haggard. I guess I just assume you might be a fan, being from Tennessee and all.

Things are progressing well on my end too. I think I am further along [these pieces are slightly easier] than I was at this time last lesson. Slow, accurate practice is the key. I also have issues with the rhythm on both pieces in the B sections. I am hoping that once I've memorized the notes, brain-hand synapses will help me play it more smoothly and figure out how the rhythm flows properly. I listen to JFD's demos periodically to get the rhythm implanted in my brain. It will come with practice.

I also have Se Io M'Accorgo re-learned to the point I could lay down some tracks. I have been playing that tune for a long time. I am now using a combination of JFD's score, Fred Noad's version in book 1, my own fingerings, and interpretation from Segovia's recording. These last few lessons, there has been one unassigned piece in each that I have wanted to learn, so I did. The Milan Pavane, the Bach minuets, and now M'Accorgo. Actually M'accorgo goes well with the Pavane for performing. I am still working on the Minuets. I love practicing that piece. Challenging to get it down right, but rewarding.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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CarlWestman
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by CarlWestman » Sat Apr 09, 2016 11:37 am

Rick Beauregard wrote:Hey, Carl. Sorry to hear about your man Merle Haggard. I guess I just assume you might be a fan, being from Tennessee and all.
I'm not sure if you're serious or not, but, actually I am not a fan of Merle Haggard, nor country music generally. I suppose that might make me an atypical Tennessean.

regarding other pieces and looking ahead slightly, I am not sure I'll do level 5 here. I would really like to master some of the Sagreras lessons books (well, I'm into book 2) and I've had a few lessons out of what I think is Noad's first book, and I really like some of the stuff in there. So I'm glad you mentioned him, and I think it's very admirable you're working beyond that which is required here. The only reason I'd prefer level 5 to any of those efforts is the structure and feedback of the lessons. I find it difficult to self-impose a practice regimen without the pressure of having to record and submit a performance, so I'm not sure how far I'd get if I "de-camped" to return to Sagreras or pursued Noad's method.

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sat Apr 09, 2016 4:36 pm

CarlWestman wrote:
Rick Beauregard wrote:Hey, Carl. Sorry to hear about your man Merle Haggard. I guess I just assume you might be a fan, being from Tennessee and all.
I'm not sure if you're serious or not, but, actually I am not a fan of Merle Haggard, nor country music generally. I suppose that might make me an atypical Tennessean.
:D

Me neither. Never was a country fan. Except country/folk rock and bluegrass and John Prine, whom I never put in that category.

Sorry you're considering not continuing next year. Our ranks have shrunk to basically you and me it seems. I know Haris is out there and maybe Duang too, but we haven't heard much from them lately. So it might just be me and the moderator, which would also be you. On the other hand I understand where you're coming from. I've toyed with getting a teacher. Some good ones in Vancouver. But as long as I am making progress here I think I'll stay and maybe take a lesson once in a while.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Rick Beauregard » Thu Apr 14, 2016 4:01 am

Here is an early take for Muzurka - Mi Favorita.


Youtube
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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CarlWestman
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Location: Chattanooga, TN

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by CarlWestman » Thu Apr 14, 2016 12:53 pm

Nicely done, Rick! Very musical.

The first couple measures seemed a bit inconsistent in terms of tempo, but I think the example video was too, though in a different way. Ironic because of the advice to use a metronome for measures 4 and 5. I'm sure you noticed a few minor glitches, such as at 0:18. I think your skill is such that you could perfect this - will you be submitting another? I love playing this piece and even though this was a very nice rendition, I can see you hitting this one out of the park. I hope to put something together creditable myself, but we'll see ... my camera seems to cause playing interference. ;)

The Strauss piece, I can't blame the camera. I'm simply dreadful at it (well, the second page, mostly). I think I have the notes in the right order, but at the moment, tempo-wise, it's a tossed salad. So awkward to play.

But Mi Favorita is so enjoyable, it makes up for it.

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Rick Beauregard » Thu Apr 14, 2016 6:18 pm

Thanks Carl. There may be a few bits that I am uncertain of and that caused the observed tempo issues. Or it is my bad rubato. I am a Segovia disciple, who said, "Tempo should be treated as a road line with trees, not telegraph poles." I'll post an update later in the month maybe. I do love this piece and it will remain in my rep. Trying to concentrate on Lockvoegel now. As you say it is the more challenging of the two.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

User avatar
Rick Beauregard
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Rick Beauregard » Fri Apr 15, 2016 12:57 am

As I mentioned earlier, I first learned Se Io M'accorgo some 35 years ago, the Fred Noad edition. Here is a sort of hybrid of his fingerings, along with JFD's, and some ideas of Segovia. I've added a little reverb, since this is not a required piece.


Youtube
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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CarlWestman
Posts: 574
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Location: Chattanooga, TN

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by CarlWestman » Fri Apr 15, 2016 11:27 am

Rick - nicely done! I felt I was transported back to a recital in Duke Chapel. Funny, I don't remember it looking like that.

EricKatz
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by EricKatz » Fri Apr 15, 2016 5:26 pm

Hello Rick,

It's indeed a beautifull piece. Strange enough it's also a mandatory piece in D05 lesson 10 :shock:
Knowing this piece already, results in easy listening. No buzzes or hesitations that distract the listener's attention.
But overall I think your rendition is too slow. Note that it is an intavolation of a SONG. That means that the upper notes form a melody. If you try to sing along with your video, you will find that it's almost impossible to sing those very long notes.

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Rick Beauregard » Fri Apr 15, 2016 8:34 pm

Thanks for the feedback Erik. I agree I played it slowly, still practice tempo. But Moderato seems too fast to me. I originally learned this piece from the Noad edition. His score doubled the notes and is suggested at 120 (which I guess would be 60 in the JFD version), slower than Moderato, more march-like (maybe funeral march) than song-like, though I agree from the title one would assume it is a song. By the way, can you please define "intavolation." I couldn't find it, even in my 1863 Webster's Unabridged Dictionary.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

EricKatz
Posts: 401
Joined: Thu Jun 06, 2013 8:49 am

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by EricKatz » Fri Apr 15, 2016 10:38 pm

Rick, if you can't play it faster at the moment, of course that's OK. Better slow than sloppy!
Sorry about the word intavolation. I was mixing English and Italian. What I meant was: "Intabulation, from the Italian word intavolatura, refers to an arrangement of a vocal or ensemble piece for keyboard, lute, or other plucked string instrument, written in tablature."
Preview of my background information for lesson 10 (D05): "Se io m'accorgo ben mio d'un altro amante" was a popular song that was sung by a vocalist and accompanied by one or more instruments. This version is an orchestration for the lute. It's from a manuscript from the 16th century with a collection of lute pieces, acquired and transcribed by Oscar Chilesotti.
The title means something like: "If I find out that my sweetheart has another lover..."

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