D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Mar 30, 2016 10:43 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D05.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.





Now we're going to work on a study:
- pages 154, 155 Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor
In the company of Tàrrega, we're going to pay a visit to fret XIX and play a top B, in bar 29. To reach this part of the fingerboard more easily you can raise your guitar up by adjusting your guitar support or your footstool to its maximum height. The path of the thumb under the neck is as follows:
1) The thumb starts off beneath the third string, opposite the middle or ring finger.
2) Then, the more the hand is moved towards the soundhole, the closer the thumb gets to the first string.
3) Finally, as you move towards the highest notes, the thumb is placed on the edge of the fingerboard, as I show you in the following short videos.

Youtube


Youtube





Today we'll look at 4 pieces.

- page 47 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
The first 4 bars establish the key. They present in succession D major, G major (with a D bass), A major 7th (with a D bass), and D major. That is to say, a succession of the tonic, subdominant, dominant and tonic. The tension increases from bar 1 to bar 3, reaching its maximum in bar 3, because of the presence of the dissonant interval D-C#. This increasing tension may be expressed with a crescendo. The tension disappears in bar 4, with the resolution of the dissonant interval by means of a fully consonant octave interval, D-D. We then have various modulations, into A major from bar 5 (G#), E minor in bar 11, B minor in bar 13, and G major in bar 16. From bar 23 there are many scale passages and we notice the presence, in the bass notes, of a pedal note on the A (the dominant), which eventually resolves into a perfect cadence in the very last bar of the prelude. This adaptation for guitar, like many others of this suite, is in D major, a key which offers the advantage that the tonic (D) and dominant (A) correspond to two of the bass strings of the guitar. The few bass notes that I have added are in brackets.

Youtube




- page 54 Niccolò Paganini (1782-1840) Sonata n°4
This short sonata, written with admirable effectiveness, includes a rondo which is light and full of zest. Note the presence of the Alberti bass (bars 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 20, 21, 22, 23, 48 and 50) which consists in arpeggiating the chords of the accompaniment starting with the root note, followed by the fifth, the third and then the fifth again. This Alberti bass was used particularly during the classical period (Fernando Sor, Mauro Giuliani). The rhythm of the melody is written without specifying the exact lengths of the notes. For instance, in bar 5 the melody consists of the notes played on strings 1 and 2, which, in my opinion, should sound like this: D dotted quarter note (dotted crotchet), F, E, D quarter notes (crotchets). Similarly in bars 6, 7, 10, 11, 20, 21, 22 and 23. Many composers of the classical period, for example Carulli, frequently notate music in this way, without giving the exact length of the notes of each of the voices making up the polyphony. This simplification of the writing saved space on the paper and made the engraver's work easier.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberti_bass

Youtube




- page 112 Zequinha de Abreu (1880-1935) Amando sobre o mar
This slow waltz from the Brazilian composer Zequinha de Abreu is made up of a melody with an extended range of pitch: from the middle D# (bar 57) to the top A (bar 11). The accompaniment should be played subtly and softly, so as to support the melody without ever drowning it out.

Youtube




Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Leccione III n°4
Here is an excellent and beautiful tremolo study. Sagreras invites us to begin by using the simplest fingering: pimi, then a more complex one: piai. Once we've mastered these fingerings, we'll go on to use the king of fingerings for tremolo: pami. Evenness of the sound and regularity of the repeated notes are essential in order to give the melody its continuity. Slow practice, together with a search for perfection in the detail, is necessary to obtain this regularity. Every note is important.

Youtube




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 47 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
- pages 154, 155 Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor




Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François


Exam qualifying submissions: :
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

Loiseng Kee
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

Eric de Vries
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

John Montes
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

Michele Franceschini
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

Håvard.Bergene
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor
:( + ♫ = :)

EricKatz
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby EricKatz » Wed Mar 30, 2016 12:14 pm

Did some research again (internet, books and CD-sleeve notes). Like to share it with you.

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Bach's six Cello Suites, BWV 1007 to 1012, are suites for unaccompanied cello. They are some of the most frequently performed and recognizable solo compositions ever written for cello. Bach most likely composed them during the period 1717–23, when he worked in Köthen as Kapellmeister for Prince Leopold von Anhalt-Köthen.
These suites for unaccompanied cello are remarkable in that they achieve the effect of implied three- to four-voice contrapuntal and polyphonic music in a single musical line. As usual in a Baroque musical suite, each movement is based on a baroque dance type; the cello suites are structured in six movements each: prelude, allemande, courante, sarabande, two minuets/bourrées/gavottes and a final gigue.
Suite No.1 (BWV 1007) is originally in G major (the transcription in this lesson is in D major): 1. Prelude 2. Allemande 3. Courante 4. Sarabande 5. Minuett I/II (these minuets are optional lesson material in D03) 6. Gigue.
This piece has many slurs. Note that these are NOT hammer-on's or pull-off's. The slur means that all the notes under it are to be played smoothly (legato). In terms of cello playing this means: they must be played with one stroke of the bow. But there is more! Some time ago there was an interesting documentary on Dutch TV about the famous cellist Anner Bijlsma. He pointed out that during the Baroque the upstroke (which begins at the point of the bow) and the downstroke (which ends at the point) were quite different. Upstroke: breathing in, tension, light. Downstroke: breathing out, relaxation, heavy. Unfortunately, the documentary wasn't clear about whether the slurs mean an upstroke or a downstroke. Anyhow, the point is that the slurred notes must have a different character than the note before and after it.
[I have been looking at videos by Bijlsma and Yo-Yo Ma. They seem to play first note (the bass note) of every bar with a downstroke (heavy, accentuated). That would mean that the following 2 or 3 slurred notes should sound as light notes. After that, we return to "normal", i.e. a bit heavier.]

Niccolò Paganini (1782-1840) Sonata n°4
Maxim Anisimov wrote a dissertation on Paganini as a guitarist (Paganini: an examination of his activity as a guitarist through works, dedications and other surviving evidence, 2009). He points out that "not many people realize that the violin genius, Niccolò Paganini, wrote the majority of his works either for guitar solo or for chamber ensembles that involved the guitar".
This Sonata in two parts (I.Minuetto - II.Rondoncino) is one of Paganini's "37 Sonate per chitarra". The year of composition is unknown. This work has no opus number, but is numbered MS 84. One would think MS means manuscript (which it probably is), but it refers to the "M" and "S" who established a numbering for the works of Paganini: Maria Rosa Moretti and Anna Sorrento (Catalogo Tematico delle musiche di Niccolò Paganini, 1982).
You can listen to the complete sonatas on the (2 CD) The 37 Guitar Sonatas, by Guido Fichtner (Dynamic). These CD's can also be found on Spotify.

Zequinha de Abreu (1880-1935) Amando sobre o mar
Most of us will know the famous song "Tico-Tico no Fubá" (which means: sparrow eating corn meal). Less known is the Brazilian composer of the song: José Gomes de Abreu (commonly known as Zequinha de Abreu).
Amando Sobre o Mar is originally a song with a Portuguese/Brazilian text and piano accompaniment. On YT there's a recording of the song by Ubirajara (Vicente Falisetto), made in 1932; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fBJ9SaENeY
It's printed in "O melhor de Zequinha de Abreu. Partituras para piano e canto com melodias e cifras" (published by Irmaos Vitale S.A., Sao Paulo, 1999).
Title: "Amando sobre o Mar!..."
Subtitle: valsa lenta (which means slow waltz, the original tempo indication is Moderato, so why the 168 bpm in the lesson book?);
Dedicated to Mrs. Dyrcéa Ricci;
Music: Zequinha Abreu; lyrics: Arlindo Marques Júnior.
Copyright: 1931
As far as I can understand the lyrics, the song is about the painfull remembrance of a love affair on the seaside (but it could also be on a boat on sea). So the title means Loving on the sea, but I saw it also translated as Love over the seas or Love across the Seas.
You can find more information about Zequinha de Abreu in a short biography by Alvaro Neder.
http://www.allmusic.com/artist/zequinha-de-abreu-mn0000599013

Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Leccione III n°4
Sagreras himself wrote: "I wanted to include in this method a study for what is commonly referred to in guitar playing as “tremolo”. As will be seen, the fingering indicated over the repeated notes is i-m-i, but it is also useful to practise with i-a-i, or with a-m-i.
In those cases where more volume is required and where the melodic movement does not have to be particularly light, the first indicated fingering should be used, while in cases where the movement needs to be quicker and where not so much volume is needed, the last indicated fingering is more appropriate. In all cases the most perfect regularity of movement should be maintained."

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Satyajit Kadle
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby Satyajit Kadle » Wed Mar 30, 2016 1:29 pm

Beautiful lessons. And thanks, Eric for making the study complete with your valuable notes.

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby John Montes » Wed Apr 06, 2016 5:28 am

Here's a 1st cut of one of the extra lessons, the Sagreras tremolo study #4.
There's a bit of a long hesitation in m26 :oops:
I was experimenting with an H4N and Audacity, no video in this one
Sagreras-L3-s4-Apr5-b.mp3
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby EricKatz » Wed Apr 06, 2016 8:42 am

Wow! This is great, John!
I suppose you been studying this piece longer than since it was posted (March 30th).
I admire your finger speed!
Did you use pima or pimi?

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby John Montes » Wed Apr 06, 2016 1:32 pm

Eric de Vries wrote:Wow! This is great, John!
I suppose you been studying this piece longer than since it was posted (March 30th).
I admire your finger speed!
Did you use pima or pimi?


In this take pami was used, when initially sight-reading I was using pimi. I started on this one the weekend before it was posted after looking at the archive pages. I like tremolo pieces and have past experience with Recuerdos de Alhambra and Una Limosna por el Amor de Dios.

Need more time with the Bach Cello prelude :-) finally got to where I can sight-read through the whole piece, but working on the rougher sections right now to smooth things out. Hoping to post a video by next weekend.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby Loiseng Kee » Fri Apr 08, 2016 2:32 pm

:bravo: John. Its amazingly!!!!

Here is my submission n for wat i can achieved so far.
Sagregas shown that my fingers are not really recovered yet. Once I roll on second string, fingers become weird n intend to roll in bigger movement. Bach n Tarrega did in single trial recording. Too tired to recorrect the mistakes!!! Lazy....hehe.... Think I should definitely redo Bach, its terribly done by me!!! :desole: Bach...

Sagreras

Youtube


Tarrega

Youtube


Bach

Youtube

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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby John Montes » Sun Apr 10, 2016 5:20 pm

Hi Loiseng, nice work with the pieces this early into lesson 8. The Tarrega piece looks like a very good scale work-out you did a nice job there.
The Bach piece was also good setting aside the known mistakes. You learn quick :-)
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby Loiseng Kee » Tue Apr 12, 2016 2:03 am

Hi John,
Really appreciate your listening and comments. I like Ur Tremolo very much, clean and precise!!! Enjoy learning yo!!!

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby EricKatz » Wed Apr 20, 2016 7:46 pm

Here are my recordings for lesson 8. I needed more time for the tremolo in Sagreras. There's also still a lot of work to do on the Paganini piece, but here's a rough first version.
As usual, comments are very welcome!

Johann Sebastian Bach - Prelude BWV 1007

Youtube



Francisco Tàrrega - Estudio en mi mayor

Youtube



Niccolò Paganini - Sonata n°4

Youtube



Zequinha de Abreu - Amando sobre o Mar

Youtube


Posted on April 26th
Here is my Sagreras lesson 4. Never studied a tremolo piece before, so still in need of speed. It's also irregular, now and then.
Nevertheless I'll post it because lesson 9 starts tomorrow!

Julio Sagreras - Leccione III n°4

Youtube
Last edited by EricKatz on Tue Apr 26, 2016 10:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby John Montes » Thu Apr 21, 2016 9:14 pm

Really good Eric, fine job :bravo: :guitare:

The Bach and Tarrega pieces flow very nicely :applauso:

The Paganini and Zequinha pieces sound like they're coming along pretty good
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby John Montes » Sun Apr 24, 2016 7:04 pm

There's some minor mistakes in there, but here's a recording of the Bach prelude and Tarrega Study

Bach Cello Prelude

Youtube


Tarrega E Major Study

Youtube
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby Loiseng Kee » Sat Apr 30, 2016 11:26 pm

Hi Eric and John,
U guys did great!!! Its a pleasure listen to urs playing. Here i post a revised bach bw1007. Even though still a few hiccups n wrong notes, hopefully its better than last recordings. Gotta move on to l09 n exam piece. See u all next lesson yo!!!


Youtube

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby EricKatz » Sun May 01, 2016 8:16 am

Well done, guys!! :bravo:

@John
IMO the Bach Prelude could be more legato. Beacause of your speed (which is a great achievement though) it tends to sound pizzicato. Every note gets a short attack and doesn't ring. My advice would be to slow down a bit what automatically will result in more legato.
In the Tarrega study you tend to make the first (bass) note of every quadruplet a bit longer than the rest. Please note that this make the exercise a lot easier than playing straight. By doing this you get some extra time to prepare the upcoming three other notes. [Listen to my own recording where I'm buying some time in m.8 when it gets tough :lol: ;-)] IMO the purpose of this exercise is learning to play fast without "cheating" this way.

@Loiseng
Great improvement! A tough piece to play by heart, but you did it. My only comment is the reverb added. Way too much to my taste. :oops: (Please note that this is strictly forbidden in the exam piece. Thank god)

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Postby Michele Franceschini » Wed May 11, 2016 2:55 am

Hello fellow students!!!

I finally dare submitting the 2 pieces for lesson 8. They are far far (far) from perfect and, especially for the prelude I intend to keep working on it throughout my life :)

Here they are, comments are more than welcome :)

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007

Youtube


Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

Youtube


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