D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Apr 27, 2016 8:28 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D05.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



Now we are going to work on a series of exercises:
- page 151 Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en re mayor n°99, Estudio en la mayor n°100.
Here is a golden opportunity to practise position changes (moving the left hand up and down the fingerboard) and at the same time to acquire a new competency in playing the higher notes.

Youtube


Youtube



Today we'll look at 4 pieces.
- page 30 Robert Johnson (1542-1603) Alman VII
Two sections oppose and respond to one another. The first is an ascending section, from the beginning of the piece to the 3rd eighth note (quaver) of bar 4. It is an almost martial section, very dynamic, and requires a lot of energy.
The second section leads us back from the dominant (E) to the tonic (A). This is a much more flowing section, which is played legato without using much energy, letting oneself be carried along on the descent from the dynamic that was created earlier with the first section.
This succession of surges and falls continues in the same way right to the end.

Youtube



- page 38 Gaspar Sanz (1640-1710) Canarios En Sol Majeur
Each 4-bar section is itself divided into 2 phrases of 2 bars each. These two 2-bar phrases form a dialogue with one another.
Begin your practice by seeking out all the sensations which will help you to recognize these two phrases as "responding to one another". Like question and answer, or like affirmation and challenge. The key to the canario is to be found in this relationship between two complementary phrases. The two phrases may sometimes be complementary in an obvious way, and sometimes in a more subtle way.

Youtube



- page 98 Américo Jacomino (1889-1928) Arrependida
After a short introduction of 4 bars, each 8-bar section is itself divided into two phrases of 4 bars each. These two 4-bar phrases form a dialogue with one another.
Begin your practice by seeking out all the sensations which will help you to recognize these two phrases as "responding to one another". Like question and answer, or like affirmation and challenge. The key to the Arrependida is to be found in this relationship between two complementary phrases.

Youtube



Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°23
Each 8-bar section is itself divided into two phrases of 4 bars each. These two 4-bar phrases form a dialogue with one another.
Begin your practice by seeking out all the sensations which will help you to recognize these two phrases as "responding to one another". The key to this Ranchera is to be found in this relationship between two complementary phrases.

Youtube








I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 98 Américo Jacomino (1889-1928) Arrependida




Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François


Exam qualifying submissions: :
Américo Jacomino (1889-1928) Arrependida

Eric de Vries
Américo Jacomino (1889-1928) Arrependida

Loiseng Kee
Américo Jacomino (1889-1928) Arrependida
:( + ♫ = :)

EricKatz
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by EricKatz » Wed Apr 27, 2016 1:07 pm

Here we go again with some background information on the 9th lesson pieces. This is what I found on the internet, in books and CD-leaflets. I also added links to some interesting video's. Hope you enjoy it!

Robert Johnson (1583–1633) Almain VII
Robert Johnson was an English composer and lutenist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean eras. He worked with William Shakespeare providing music for some of his later plays.
The almain or allemande is a renaissance and baroque dance. This Almain is part of John Sturt’s Lute Book, a manuscript from 1610 containing solos and duets for 6- to 10-course lute in Renaissance tuning. In the manuscript it is simply called "Allmayne by Robert Johnson", but it's often presented as "The Prince's Almain".

Gaspar Sanz (1640-1710) Canarios En Sol Majeur
The two canarios from the lesson book are often played together, although the first one is in D major and the second in G major. One of my favorite recordings is by Hopkinson Smith on baroque guitar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyNB-sCRACA
The Canario is a Renaissance dance, a graceful type of the saltarello, originally from Gran Canaria. An impression of the dance is given by this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jh-94sxuduI

Américo Jacomino (1889-1928) Arrependida
"Arrependida" can be translated as "regretfull" (said of a female person).
The Brazilian guitarist Américo Jacomino was also known as Canhoto (=left-handed man). His parents were Italian immigrants from Naples. Jacomino was a guitar pedagogue and composed not only for the guitar, but also for piano and orchestra. Arrependida (valsa lenta) was recorded on a 78 RPM disc (Odeon) in 1928. You can hear the original recording on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rRMG9M1wpI with some funny pics. A must see!!
Note the slow pace of the recording by Canhoto. Arrependida is a slow waltz (valsa lenta). According to Wikipedia a slow waltz has a tempo of 84-90 bpm, so the tempo indication in the lesson book (bpm=152) is way too fast!

Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°23
Sagreras only gives a short comment on this piece in his lesson book: "Pay great attention to the indicated fingering and accented notes."
The tempo indication says: tiempo ranchera. "Ranchera" is derived from the word rancho because this kind of music (mostly songs) originated on the ranches and in the countryside. To get a good impression of the Ranchera, listen to "Mate amargo" by the Argentinian singer Julia Elena Dávalos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQl7S-Hr1gM
A rangera can have a metric in 2/4 (ranchera polkeada), 3/4 (ranchera valseada), or 4/4 (bolero ranchero) reflecting the tempo of, respectively, the polka, the waltz, and the bolero. Professor Delcamp plays this ranchera in about 104-112 bpm.

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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by John Montes » Thu Apr 28, 2016 2:13 pm

Definitely enjoy it Eric, I always learn something new from the additional background and info or become introduced to other artists recordings and interpretations of the guitar repertoire
2001 Vicente Carrillo 1a Rio
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EricKatz
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by EricKatz » Thu May 05, 2016 10:25 am

Here are my submissions for lesson 9. I love these recording sessions. They give you feed back and show where there's more work to do. But I hate them also. Just like every on-line student, what seems to go well during practice, doesn't come out when the camera is running. So I made many restarts, trying to get that one perfect take, untill my fingers got hurt and/or tired. So although some phrases or endings are screwed up, it's enough for today.

Américo Jacomino - Arrependida

Youtube


Julio Sagreras - Lecciones III n°23 Ranchera

Youtube


Robert Johnson - Almain VII

Youtube


Gaspar Sanz - Canarios in G Major

Youtube

Loiseng Kee
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Loiseng Kee » Thu May 05, 2016 1:28 pm

Eric, :bravo:
Exam is near!!! Eventhough I am not ready, I have to get lesson 9 done first n move on to exam piece... :desole: for all the mistakes, hehe. Wish u all good luck for the coming exam ya!!!!


Youtube

Michele Franceschini
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Michele Franceschini » Wed May 11, 2016 3:00 am

Eric, thank you so much as usual for the background information!!!!!

Tim Wang
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Tim Wang » Wed May 11, 2016 9:12 am

Hey guys,

Long time no see. Just wanted to say keep up the good work and good luck on the exams! Sorry I wasn't able to keep up with the classes... Got busy during Christmas season and never found a way to catch up! I guess I'll just have to retake this course next year!!

Håvard.Bergene
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Håvard.Bergene » Wed May 11, 2016 9:57 am

:bravo: Bravo Loiseng. It's a difficult piece, and you manged very well. I'm sure you can fix the mistakes easily:-) Generally I think you could try to make the slides end on beat. I think you tend to start the slide on beat, and end it quite a bit after, making it sound a bit syncopated. But still :casque:
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