D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Mon Dec 05, 2016 2:47 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D05.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



Now we are going to work on a series of exercises:
- page 131 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) EXTENSIONS
Play this left-hand exercise trying to leave your fingers in place on the strings as long as you can, as I show you in the following video. If the stretches between your fingers feel too much for you, you can make it easier for the left hand by using a capo so that you play on the higher frets which are closer together and your fingers will not have to stretch so far apart. Avoid bending your left wrist, as this not only hurts, but also hinders the mobility of your fingers. Aim for the position (of the guitar neck, your elbow and your shoulder) which will allow you to play without bending your left wrist, as shown in the following video. You will be able to play this exercise more effectively if you place your left thumb below your ring finger, i.e. below the third fret.

Youtube



- page 148 Degli arpeggi 48-98
Mauro Giuliani is the first teacher to have published a systematic study of arpeggios ( http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... liani.html : Opus. 1 - Studio per la chitarra, Prima parte : 120 arpeggi). I recommend that you practise a few arpeggios each day and change them regularly with the aim of studying all of them in two years. You can listen to the mp3s of the 120 arpeggios recorded by Marco Cairone here: http://www.chitarraclassicadelcamp.com/ ... 32&t=25253 .


Don't forget, thoughout the year, to work on scales (pages 136 to 142) several times per week.
Page 142, I suggest some varied rhythms which will help you to achieve greater speed.


Today we'll look at 5 pieces.
- page 8 Luys de Narvàez (ca. 1500-1555) Tres Diferencias por otra parte
These diferencias, or variations, follow on from the "Diferencias sobre guardame las vacas" which we studied in lesson number two. Here the key is D minor and each of the 3 variations consists of a total of 10 bars broken up into (4)+(4+2) bars. An increasing number of hemiolas appear at the end of each variation. The shorter note values occur in the middle voice in the first variation, the upper voice in the second, and the lower and then all three voices to finish.

Youtube


Youtube



- page 29 Jean-Baptiste Besard (1567-1625) Ballet
Each phrase begins with an upbeat in the fourth beat. Bars 9 to 13 are repeated as a division in bars 14 to 18. A division is a variation where the same theme is repeated in shorter note values, owing to the addition of notes of ornamentation between the original notes. In the following illustration, the added notes are circled.
Image

Youtube



- page 50 Guiseppe Antonio Brescianello (1690-1757) Allegro de la Partita VII
Here the range of pitch (from the lowest to the highest note, sometimes also called the ambitus or compass) is one of the two key elements. The other key element of this allegro is the expression of duality on several levels: two sections (AABB), two tempi, two voices, etc. Each phrase is repeated a second time, either exactly or with a small variation. In the first two phrases the range of pitch decreases gradually: the treble notes descend while the basses rise. In bar 1 the range is 2 octaves, and it decreases eventually to 1 octave by bar 4. Likewise from bar 5 to bar 8. Then Brescianello reverses the process: he starts bar 9 with a unison, then the bass descends while the treble goes up to finish with a wider range. Bars 9 to 16 give the feeling of two successive waves and then, in his search for duality, Brescianello introduces a brief lull in bars 17 and 18. He concludes in bars 19 to 23 by returning to the energy and the jubilation of the allegro. Still seeking duality, Brescianello introduces the second key of D major for his second section, which repeats the phrases of the first while enriching them with the new phrase of bars 32 to 35.

Youtube



- page 67 Matteo Carcassi (1792-1853) Etude XVI opus 60
Here the melody evolves within a small range of pitch. The melody is played almost exclusively on the first string using rest stroke. The accompaniment occupies the free spaces between the melody notes. Accompaniment and melody are always distinct, and their meeting, on the third beat of the last bar, brings the étude to a close.

Youtube


Youtube



- page 114 João Guimarães (Pernambuco) (1883-1947) Sons de carillhões
The maxixe is sometimes called the Brazilian tango.
The first section in D major is based mostly on the use of 3 chords: D major, E minor and A seventh. In bars 13 and 14 we find a diminished chord arpeggio, like those we've come across in lesson number 3, in the Preludio en ré mayor by Juliàn Arcas (1832-1882). The second section modulates into the key of G major, that is to say the subdominant of D major, the main key of this chôro. At the beginning of this second section the rhythm which was that of the accompaniment (one eighth note [quaver] - 2 sixteenth notes [semiquavers]) becomes, in bars 18 and then 26, the rhythm of the main part.

Youtube


Youtube


Youtube



I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 50 Guiseppe Antonio Brescianello (1690-1757) Allegro de la Partita VII
- page 114 João Guimarães (pernambuco) (1883-1947) Sons de carillhões




Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François


Exam qualifying submissions: :
Guiseppe Antonio Brescianello (1690-1757) Allegro de la Partita VII
João Guimarães (pernambuco) (1883-1947) Sons de carillhões


Rick Beauregard
João Guimarães (pernambuco) (1883-1947) Sons de carillhões
Guiseppe Antonio Brescianello (1690-1757) Allegro de la Partita VII

Angela Zhao
Guiseppe Antonio Brescianello (1690-1757) Allegro de la Partita VII
João Guimarães (pernambuco) (1883-1947) Sons de carillhões

Esteban Crespi
João Guimarães (pernambuco) (1883-1947) Sons de carillhões
Guiseppe Antonio Brescianello (1690-1757) Allegro de la Partita VII

Stewart Doyle
Guiseppe Antonio Brescianello (1690-1757) Allegro de la Partita VII
João Guimarães (pernambuco) (1883-1947) Sons de carillhões
:( + ♫ = :)

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sat Dec 10, 2016 11:23 pm

Hi everyone. Happy December.

I've been working on Sons de Carillhões a lot, I love it! I've pretty much learned the notes and am working on getting up the tempo, especially the three runs in M12-15, M21-24 and M29-32. Regarding the second one M21-24, I've tried a couple different right hand fingerings trying to get the speed up. At first I played it all with i & m, but was getting mixed up with the first string change in M20 from D to B. So I tried playing the B on the 4th string with p instead and am working on that. It seems a little easier/faster maybe, once I get it in my fingers. Less fraught with error.

Another little change I made more because I like the sound is in M23. In stead of changing string from 2 to 3 I stay on 2 and slide down, and back up again into the F#. It has a nice effect. We'll see If I can do it fast or not. I think it will be as fast as the alternative.

Does anyone else have any suggestions on this piece regarding fingering?
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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sun Dec 11, 2016 12:01 am

Here's an early take, not all the repeats. Lots of work to do. Barks and growls and all. Thanks for listening.
Sons de Carillhoes.mp3
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All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by John Montes » Mon Dec 12, 2016 12:38 am

Rick Beauregard wrote:Here's an early take, not all the repeats. Lots of work to do. Barks and growls and all. Thanks for listening.
Sons de Carillhoes.mp3
There's some parts in there that are coming along well, just a few more that need smoothing out at a very slow tempo.

This is one of my favorites from the D05 work-book, its a piece that Carlos Barbosa-Lima always plays in concert, although with some slight variations.

The only fingering alternative/substitution I recall using was in m31, where I use a 1 note per string arpeggio fingering for the 2nd arpeggio.
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Stewart Doyle
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Stewart Doyle » Fri Dec 16, 2016 8:01 pm

Hi Rick
As John says, it's coming along well. I've had a quick look in the archives to see if fingering was discussed much. I couldn't see much but I recall that a few students played wrong notes in the fast runs even though they sounded 'right'. For example some discussions around c/c# in m23.

I think the Allegro has some more interesting fingering choices. By looking in the archives again I noticed the fingering in m37 used to be (in earlier versions of the D05 score) 3212 1323 which I find a whole lot easier than 4212 3414. The thing is, I've put the new fingering on my score and remember playing it that way but I can't remember if I did this to get out of my comfort zone or whether there's a strong musical reason for doing so?

PS one of the barks was spot on the beat, but then they seemed to lose it!
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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Rick Beauregard » Fri Dec 16, 2016 10:29 pm

Stewart Doyle wrote: PS one of the barks was spot on the beat, but then they seemed to lose it!
I should think he's learned it by now. He's listened to it a gazillion times.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
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Angela Zhao
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Angela Zhao » Sat Dec 17, 2016 1:48 am

Hi everyone

This is my assignment, I'm sorry for some mistakes in them, it's not easy get a better record.
Your comments are very valuable for me. Thank you very much! :merci:

Guiseppe Antonio Brescianello (1690-1757) Allegro de la Partita VII

Youtube


João Guimarães (pernambuco) (1883-1947) Sons de carillhões

Youtube

Esteban Crespi
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Esteban Crespi » Sat Dec 17, 2016 12:57 pm

Hello Angela, very well done,
the Allegro, with the exception of small errors is very well played at a very good tempo. Bravo!

However I think you have an error in the rhythm in Sons of Carillõhes, take the first compass (after the anacrusa), between the second group D-F# and the A in the fifth string you are making a pause of an eighth (quaver) instead of one sixteenth (semiquaver), this is very noticeable as the first half of the measure one sixteenth longer than the second, breaking the rhythm. The whole measure takes one sixteenth longer than it should.I recommend you to hear Professor Delcamp's version at a slow pace to hear what I mean or play it with a metronome.

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sat Dec 17, 2016 10:29 pm

Angela Zhao wrote:Hi everyone

This is my assignment, I'm sorry for some mistakes in them, it's not easy get a better record.
Your comments are very valuable for me. Thank you very much! :merci:

Guiseppe Antonio Brescianello (1690-1757) Allegro de la Partita VII

Youtube


João Guimarães (pernambuco) (1883-1947) Sons de carillhões

Youtube

Well done again Angela. I agree with the comments about rhythm. Also, you might start thinking about your tone production. Your tone comes across in your videos as somewhat thin. This could be from long nails, or attaching the string with the nails too flat. Or it could be nail shape. It is tough to tell from the angle of your videos. In any case, research tone production here or on other sites This is one of the key things a good teacher would work with you on at this level. Unfortunately you can't have a teacher to provide specific critique. Make sure your nails are filed to match the rounded shape of your finger tip and somewhat short, not extending too far beyond the finger tip. Then attack the string nor at an oblique angle to get a rounded mellow tone.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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Angela Zhao
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Angela Zhao » Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:00 am

Thank Esteban and Rick
Thank your give me valuable comments.

I'll fix the rhythm of Sons of Carillõhes,hear the Delacmp'version carefully.

As the tone of the guitar, I have watched the videos on youtube, and also practise to choose the shape of my finger,but I still not find the best one,in winter my finger not soft,maybe it's sound not mellow,Thanks Rick suggest so many advices,I'll get on.Find the best solution.

:merci:

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sun Dec 18, 2016 5:52 pm

I'm sure you will. Sometimes it takes a lot of experimentation to get the perfect tone.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sun Jan 01, 2017 12:58 am

Here is the ALLEGRO. Far from perfect. I need more time to get this up to recommended tempo. I'll continue to work on it the remainder of this lesson until lesson 5 comes out. I spent most of my time this month on Son Carillhoes. I am still working on that video. Coming soon I hope.
Youtube
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sun Jan 01, 2017 4:37 am

Sons de Carillhoes, a little more relaxed than the prescribed 76 bpm. But I think that's a little rushed. 70 is maybe more like it.


Youtube


I've listened to a number of recordings of Sons. I am curious why the rhythm changes in M20 in this version. Some play this more bouncy rhythm throughout the piece, instead of the more Cha-Cha-Cha that this edition has. I think I prefer it the more bouncy choro feel. Here a short snip audio to shown what I mean.
Sons de Carillhoes - rev.mp3
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All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sun Jan 01, 2017 2:45 pm

Hi Rick,

No comments for Allegro. It just needs more work to get more fluent. Regarding Sons de Carillhoes, I think I've seen some discussion about the rhythm variations here at Delcamp (outside the lessons) before, but am not sure if anybody knew the reason for it. You'll probably find the discussion easily with search. I really have no preference one way or another, both ways sound fine to me, and you did a good job with the piece. Bravo!
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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sun Jan 01, 2017 4:49 pm

Thanks Marko. It's a great piece and I enjoy playing it. Though I need a break from it for a while it will remain on the list. I imagine this piece began its life in the unwritten tradition. Unlike perhaps an old baroque lute piece transcribed from written tablature, maybe some license is allowed in interpreting it if it remains within the choro genre.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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