Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

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Paul Berge
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Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by Paul Berge » Wed Apr 09, 2014 1:06 pm

This is the best presentation of the Segovia scales that I have seen to date. Thank you for taking the time to create this!

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David
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Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by David » Mon May 19, 2014 12:54 am

Paul Berge wrote:This is the best presentation of the Segovia scales that I have seen to date. Thank you for taking the time to create this!
Paul,

That's very kind. Thank you.


David
"No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong." - Albert Einstein

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David
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Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by David » Thu Oct 08, 2015 11:44 pm

Re-uploaded files

Mod note: files now replaced in first post
"No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong." - Albert Einstein

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John Montes
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Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by John Montes » Mon Oct 12, 2015 2:11 am

Hi David,

Thanks for taking the time to develop this analytical approach to digesting the Segovia Scales.
It can be a very valuable aid in rapid scale development and fingerboard mastery.

I do not have the Segovia scales book, but I acquired the Aaron Shearer Scale Patterns book over the summer that seems to cover similar terrain + a few additional scales (natural minor, harmonic minor, chromatic) and many sequence pattern exercises at a whooping 267 pages :-)
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Roger Dorfield

Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by Roger Dorfield » Thu Nov 12, 2015 1:27 am

These example are exactly what I needed to understand how to practice Andres Segovia scales.

Thank you

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Frousse
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Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by Frousse » Thu Nov 12, 2015 12:09 pm

Thanks for posting this. It will help many aspiring guitarists.

RamonCandido

Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by RamonCandido » Tue Nov 24, 2015 1:41 pm

Downloaded these PDFs and will apply the technique. Thank you so much, I am now starting my lessons on this site.

RamonCandido

Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by RamonCandido » Thu Nov 26, 2015 4:32 pm

I thought I was dealing with the CAGED system scale pattern. Adopting this Segovia scales is a new ball game for me. I created my own scale pattern which is the parallel mode. If I want a Aeolian scale of the D major I simply use the 3rd note of the D major which is F, not F# and start on the D note. Likewise if you want a dorian scale use the C the 7th note of D major, not C# but C and start on the D note. I am now familiarizing myself with the Segovia scales and will label these patterns in such a way I will remember them. The scales are not "box type" as in the CAGED system.

RamonCandido

Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by RamonCandido » Mon Nov 30, 2015 1:03 am

This is my final comment on Segovia Scales.. it has extensions of the scale, label the pattern as 5-1 fifth fret 1st finger etc. The truth is using the pattern and the CAGED system will only confuse my practice. Instead I rely on my 1st 2nd and 4th finger on where I want to start the scale. In actual playing of the music, the mode, melody, chords, inversions, flatten notes, tempo and others things in there is in my mind. The pattern and CAGED system all disappear but noticed as you play along.

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robin loops
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Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by robin loops » Mon Nov 30, 2015 7:05 pm

You can use a crescent wrench to beat in a nail but a hammer works much better. Likewise CAGED is not so much for scale work and more for tying in various positions on the guitar and being able to move around (used correctly it serves best for knowing how to play a chord in any position on the guitar). Think of CAGED as a 'framework' for scales (and chords) rather than actual scales. To use it for moving chords: If you play an A form barre chord with the same root as the root of the C chord (previous letter in CAGED) it will be the same chord. If you move it up to the next position and play a G form barre chord it is the same chord, and so on.

For the most part, other than learning the neck, CAGED is not extremely useful for classical only guitar players and is designed more for other more 'free' musical styles (in that you really don't spend a lot of time moving chords around on the neck in classical guitar). That being said, an overall understanding of this concept is still useful to any type of player (classical included) and I highly recommend learning it well.
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syrf78

Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by syrf78 » Thu Dec 03, 2015 8:31 pm

Thanks for putting this out there. I especially like the Scale Fret Map, it's exactly what I was looking for.

Suman Rao

Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by Suman Rao » Tue Jan 05, 2016 6:01 am

Thanks Kampret.

Will start with the pattern approach, let's see how it goes

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David
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Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by David » Wed Jan 06, 2016 6:55 am

RamonCandido wrote:This is my final comment on Segovia Scales.. it has extensions of the scale, label the pattern as 5-1 fifth fret 1st finger etc. The truth is using the pattern and the CAGED system will only confuse my practice. Instead I rely on my 1st 2nd and 4th finger on where I want to start the scale. In actual playing of the music, the mode, melody, chords, inversions, flatten notes, tempo and others things in there is in my mind. The pattern and CAGED system all disappear but noticed as you play along.
Hi

The purpose of this this approach is simple, it is to point out that many of the scales have the same fingerings (patterns), they just start in different positions on the fretboard. And by recognizing this, you can learn the scales more quickly. For instance, if you know C Major, you also know D Major, Db Major, Eb Major. It is not an attempt to give players a new set of scales to learn, there are a lot of those already, rather it's just a different way of tackling Segovia's Diatonic Major and Minor scales, probably the most widely used group of scales the CGs use.


David
"No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong." - Albert Einstein

Casey Korstanje
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Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by Casey Korstanje » Mon Feb 08, 2016 10:34 pm

I know this is an old thread but I keep discovering these wonderful and free materials on the site. Thanks.
Is there a particular scales and arpeggio studies book you would recommend?

Gadam

Re: Segovia Scales - A Pattern Approach

Post by Gadam » Thu Mar 10, 2016 7:33 pm

Tiago wrote:
wianno wrote:Now I'll contradict what I just said by preaching the need for classical guitarists to begin to memorize chord patterns at an early stage of development. The idea of movable chord patterns, say as presented by Bill Edwards in his Fretboard Logic publication, is in my opinion very important to the student guitarist, not only for execution but also for learning harmony. What are your thoughts about this?
Memorizing chord patterns doesn't seem the best approach to me. I think it won't hurt to teach guitar students at least the most fundamentals of harmony on the guitar. It's not rocket science, their brains won't blow up.

By fundamentals I mean scales without open notes so that we can transpose them very easily. Basically 2 or 3 fingering patterns allow us to play a scale in any key in any position of the fretboard with any number of octaves. (Including obviously the Segovia scales)

Intervals. Thirds, Sixths and fifths. Then scales in those intervals.

Finally, how to build triads and then the "Gran Chord" as Sor calls it, which are the chord shapes that we recognize. This immediately render useless every single chord chart.

This is the very least.
I have found a good resonance in this answer to what I might be looking for at this point of time. I am a beginner classical guitar student and I am finding it uncomfortable to go ahead without 'the fundamentals'. Pls refer to: viewtopic.php?f=4&t=103133

I am very interested in what you suggested as 'fundamentals', can you point to any resources where I could pursue them?

Thank you!

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