The Harp-Lute

Discussion of all aspects of early instruments, lutes, theorbos, vihuelas, Renaissance guitars and Baroque guitars.
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pogmoor
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The Harp-Lute

Postby pogmoor » Sun Apr 07, 2013 11:56 am

There’s been a bit of discussion in this thread, viewtopic.php?f=11&t=76481 about the Harp-Guitar. I notice the guitarist/lutenist Rob McKillop has posted a few videos and information about a related instrument, the Harp-Lute, on his website http://19th-centuryguitar.com/. As ever Rob’s playing is beautiful and well worth a listen :)
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jhapgood
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Re: The Harp-Lute

Postby jhapgood » Tue Apr 09, 2013 4:47 pm

That was interesting. Thanks for sharing the link!

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Scot Tremblay
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Edward Light Harp-Lute

Postby Scot Tremblay » Wed Apr 10, 2013 7:35 pm

My friend Rob (Where Does He Find The Time) MacKillop has taken up another relative of the guitar and is happily sharing his adventures. I know that all of us guitar players have come across a photo or two of or perhaps actually seen one or two of these odd guitar/lute/harp/? instruments which were popular during the last part of the 18th and early part of the 19th century. There was a whole "Back to the Greeks" cultural revival going on at the time and luthier Edward Light was quick to take advantage of the wave. There is more info here:

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/50.184.1

And here:

http://www.harpguitars.net/history/org/ ... -lutes.htm

And here's what it sound like:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... HodAb59VU#!
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"One picture is worth a thousand words. So, for me, one good note put where it should be put, will say what it will take some people many notes to say. ~B.B. King, 1986

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Re: Edward Light Harp-Lute

Postby guitarseller345645 » Wed Apr 10, 2013 8:06 pm

Scot, what is the minimum number of strings necessary to achieve all the 'frequencies' that exist? Is it 10 - reason for 10 string guitars being so popular?
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Re: Edward Light Harp-Lute

Postby PAN A575 » Wed Apr 10, 2013 8:49 pm

Scot Tremblay wrote:...these odd guitar/lute/harp/? instruments which were popular during the last part of the 18th and early part of the 19th century. There was a whole "Back to the Greeks" cultural revival going on at the time and luthier Edward Light was quick to take advantage of the wave.


Interesting instrument and thanks for sharing. Is your friend hoping to be instrumental in its second revival? :wink:

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Re: The Harp-Lute

Postby pogmoor » Wed Apr 10, 2013 9:26 pm

Two similar threads merged :)
Eric from GuitarLoot
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Re: The Harp-Lute

Postby Scot Tremblay » Thu Apr 11, 2013 12:28 am

pogmoor wrote:Two similar threads merged :)


Sorry pogmoor, I didn't notice your earlier posting. Thanks for putting them together.
Scot Tremblay Guitars

"One picture is worth a thousand words. So, for me, one good note put where it should be put, will say what it will take some people many notes to say. ~B.B. King, 1986

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Re: Edward Light Harp-Lute

Postby Scot Tremblay » Thu Apr 11, 2013 12:48 am

guitarseller345645 wrote:Scot, what is the minimum number of strings necessary to achieve all the 'frequencies' that exist? Is it 10 - reason for 10 string guitars being so popular?


I don't really know what to optimum number of string would be, I'll have to find out but the way our musical system is laid out I suspect many more than 10. The popularity of the 10 string instrument is that it is a manageable number and it's a number that fits most easily into our human psyche...10 finger/toes, 10 cents to a dime 10 dimes to a dollar, ten times ten dollars to a hundred etc. Many things in our world are multiples of 10 so it's in our brains and we can comfortably work with it.

Once lutes went beyond 10 courses at the end of the Renaissance things changed drastically for the instrument, players, music and it has been argued that was the beginning of the end for the instrument (I don't really subscribe to that particular theory but too many courses may have been one factor in it's eventual demise).

I think the Russian 10 string guitar with it's seven strings on the fretboard and three floating makes much sense if one were diatonically tuning the instrument. The Yepes/Ramirez 10 string makes the most sense for his particular tuning (F# G# A# C E A D G B E) and is probably the most versatile.
Scot Tremblay Guitars

"One picture is worth a thousand words. So, for me, one good note put where it should be put, will say what it will take some people many notes to say. ~B.B. King, 1986


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