Let's Learn How to Analyze a Piece!

Analyses of individual works for Classical Guitar and general discussions on analysis. Normal forum copyright rules apply.
wchymeus
Posts: 133
Joined: Fri Jul 24, 2015 11:49 am

Re: Let's Learn How to Analyze a Piece!

Post by wchymeus » Sat Aug 13, 2016 6:35 am

Thanks Steve for taking this much time! very clear analysis and yes, you can certainly write a lot more but I guess it's enough for this Carulli :wink:
Field 2014, Oberg 2013, Vincente Sachis Badia 1977

markworthi
Posts: 240
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2014 5:33 pm
Location: Forest Hills, NY

Re: Let's Learn How to Analyze a Piece!

Post by markworthi » Thu Aug 25, 2016 9:15 pm

stevel wrote:
markworthi wrote:
So in Am, the only chords that can have a V(7) or viio(7) applied to them are:

C (G7 or Bo7)
Dm (A7 or C#o7)
E (B7 or D#o7)
F (C7 or Eo7)

And of course the A chord has it's own dominants - E7 or G#o7, but they're the "primary" dominants and already part of the key.

Now, you can't have a "V/viio" or a "viio/viio" because viio can't be a tonic.

But, if you use the natural "bVII" - that would be G Major in the key of Am, you could in fact tonicize that with D7 or F#o7.

There is a correlation between the chords in the key and what we call "Closely Related Keys" (keys that differ from the original by no more than one accidental in the key signature) but with tonicization it's really about the chord simply being in the key to begin with. There's probably a favoring of V, and IV as maybe the two most tonicized chords, but really any of them (as long as they're not diminished) are commonly tonicized.

Best,
Steve
Hi Steve,

I have returned to this thread again, and have read your response to my question. Once again, I am finding it incredibly helpful and would like to thank you for generously taking the time. I'll continue on in the other analysis threads.

All the best to you!

Mark

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singvomblatt
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Joined: Sun Nov 30, 2008 4:48 pm
Location: 79006 Freiburg/ Germany

Re: Let's Learn How to Analyze a Piece!

Post by singvomblatt » Fri Aug 26, 2016 12:08 pm

this is wonderful work. I would like to reread it and save it.

:merci:


as ist goes on I might contribute also.

greetings: Heidi

Bynorthemore
Posts: 13
Joined: Sun Aug 28, 2016 12:00 pm
Location: United States

Re: Let's Learn How to Analyze a Piece!

Post by Bynorthemore » Wed Aug 31, 2016 11:13 pm

And this is why I joined this forum. Thank you, stevel, for taking the time to put this together.

stevel
Posts: 539
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2011 2:15 pm

Re: Let's Learn How to Analyze a Piece!

Post by stevel » Fri Sep 30, 2016 9:41 pm

Bynorthemore wrote:And this is why I joined this forum. Thank you, stevel, for taking the time to put this together.
You're very welcome!

druidplayguitar
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2017 4:20 pm

Re: Let's Learn How to Analyze a Piece!

Post by druidplayguitar » Wed Mar 01, 2017 4:31 pm

Good work! Thanks.
But I have a question here.
How does the analysis of the work help the guitar player to perform better?
I mean, after the analysis, I just know what chords a piece has, what's next? I think it should be more analysis for playing a piece beautifully.

Mr Kite

Re: Let's Learn How to Analyze a Piece!

Post by Mr Kite » Fri Mar 03, 2017 9:55 am

That's really a question of phrasing, so you would need to look at phrasing structure and how it relates to metrical structure. The phrasing structure does depend partly on harmony, so it is still important to understand that side.

You talk about knowing the chords - if you browse through this subforum you'll see that a distinction is often made between "naming the chords" and "functional analysis". When you are just looking at harmony you can be forgiven for thinking that there isn't much difference, because functional analysis is just giving the chords a bunch of different names that don't actually give you any more information - OK, sometimes they give you a good clue as to the next chord, but that's still naming chords, just two at a time.

Once you start to look at the longer arcs in the music and the relative importance of the phrases - which IMHO is one of the keys to musicality - it becomes more useful to understand how the chords are getting where they are going (like the difference between a ii7 and a V7/V) and see how they relate to the tonic. I find that functional labels can make this clearer, although they are not the end of the story.

stevel
Posts: 539
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2011 2:15 pm

Re: Let's Learn How to Analyze a Piece!

Post by stevel » Thu Mar 23, 2017 1:04 am

druidplayguitar wrote:Good work! Thanks.
But I have a question here.
How does the analysis of the work help the guitar player to perform better?
I mean, after the analysis, I just know what chords a piece has, what's next? I think it should be more analysis for playing a piece beautifully.
Well, there are some chords that are unusual or less common.

One we might encounter frequently in Guitar music of the Classical and early Romantic composers is the Neapolitan Chord. It has a special purpose. Do you know what that is? Could you find one in a piece? Do you then, knowing that X chord is a Neapolitan, approach playing it differently? (most would argue, you should).

What about a German Augmented 6th chord? Or, what about a German Augmented 6th chord used in an enharmonic modulation? Are these important, or do you just burn through them like you would any other old chord?

Earlier in this thread we talked about Applied or Secondary Dominant chords. Many theorists say they "intensify" the chord they're applied to.

Should a player then also "intensify" that chord musically?

What about a Half Cadence versus an Authentic Cadence versus a Deceptive Cadence? Do you know what they are? Can you identify them? Could they inform the way you play a piece? (again, most would argue it should).

What about antecedent and consequent phrases, or parallel periods and parallel double periods? Does knowing what they are and being able to identify them allow you to perform the piece in a more informed manner?

What about Rondo Form, or Rounded Binary Form, or Sonata Form? Should the Development section be approached in a musical way that differs from say, the 2nd theme? What about the Recapitulation? Is it important? Do you emphasize it, or place more musical weight on it?

What about main and secondary entrances of motives in contrapuntal pieces? Do you know what the Subject and Counter-Subject in a Fugue is? When they appear later, does knowing what they are inform your performance?

Analysis works on MANY levels, and gives the player a more informed understanding of not only the "layers of complexity" within a piece, but potentially, the composer's intentions.

Best,
Steve

druidplayguitar
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2017 4:20 pm

Re: Let's Learn How to Analyze a Piece!

Post by druidplayguitar » Tue Apr 04, 2017 5:19 pm

stevel wrote:
druidplayguitar wrote:Good work! Thanks.
But I have a question here.
How does the analysis of the work help the guitar player to perform better?
I mean, after the analysis, I just know what chords a piece has, what's next? I think it should be more analysis for playing a piece beautifully.
Well, there are some chords that are unusual or less common.

One we might encounter frequently in Guitar music of the Classical and early Romantic composers is the Neapolitan Chord. It has a special purpose. Do you know what that is? Could you find one in a piece? Do you then, knowing that X chord is a Neapolitan, approach playing it differently? (most would argue, you should).

What about a German Augmented 6th chord? Or, what about a German Augmented 6th chord used in an enharmonic modulation? Are these important, or do you just burn through them like you would any other old chord?

Earlier in this thread we talked about Applied or Secondary Dominant chords. Many theorists say they "intensify" the chord they're applied to.

Should a player then also "intensify" that chord musically?

What about a Half Cadence versus an Authentic Cadence versus a Deceptive Cadence? Do you know what they are? Can you identify them? Could they inform the way you play a piece? (again, most would argue it should).

What about antecedent and consequent phrases, or parallel periods and parallel double periods? Does knowing what they are and being able to identify them allow you to perform the piece in a more informed manner?

What about Rondo Form, or Rounded Binary Form, or Sonata Form? Should the Development section be approached in a musical way that differs from say, the 2nd theme? What about the Recapitulation? Is it important? Do you emphasize it, or place more musical weight on it?

What about main and secondary entrances of motives in contrapuntal pieces? Do you know what the Subject and Counter-Subject in a Fugue is? When they appear later, does knowing what they are inform your performance?

Analysis works on MANY levels, and gives the player a more informed understanding of not only the "layers of complexity" within a piece, but potentially, the composer's intentions.

Best,
Steve
Wow, there are so much knowledge about analyzing...
I really want to study it from the first level! ...With a book...
Could you recommend some material for a student not major in music?

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