Brouwer: Estudio 2 chords

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uptempo
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Brouwer: Estudio 2 chords

Post by uptempo » Fri Feb 19, 2016 8:35 pm

Hello all

Can someone identify a chord for me from Brouwer's Study no 2.

It is the fourth beat of the first measure. I assume that the first chord is a Bm7 but the following chord is bugging me. I enjoy trying to analyse the music I play but often I stumble identifying chords. It sounds like either a suspended chord or a diminishes but probably totally wrong.

Thanks
"Never believe what an artist says, only what they do" - Walter Sickert

Nick Cutroneo
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Re: Brouwer: Estudio 2 chords

Post by Nick Cutroneo » Sat Feb 20, 2016 5:04 am

I'd analyze the first chord as a GMajadd9 chord (DAB - with a low G in the bass), the FGC (on beat 4) is merely a suspension of the previous chord, it can also be analyzed as a Fsus2 chord, however I prefer to hear how the chord functions rather then going by just "naming the chord". When you play the first chord DAB with a low G followed by the FGC with a low G, you can clearly hear the suspension created by the 2nd chord.

I'd suggest as you analyze the piece, to include the bass note at the end of each phrase-let with the chord, as it's a 4 voice texture.

There's a lot of music in this 3 line study. Enjoy!
Nick Cutroneo - Classical Guitarist, performer/teacher/suzuki instructor

uptempo
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Re: Brouwer: Estudio 2 chords

Post by uptempo » Sat Feb 20, 2016 6:17 pm

Thanks Nick

I agree with your views on this. I guess it is atonal and so the chords could be described in several ways. But I get the point about the bass running through the study as being some indicator to the structure.
"Never believe what an artist says, only what they do" - Walter Sickert

D.Cass
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Re: Brouwer: Estudio 2 chords

Post by D.Cass » Sat Feb 20, 2016 7:26 pm

Another veiw point would be the second chord is a Csus4 in 2nd inversion, G in the bass. This makes it a I to IV chord with the G being pedaled. Very common in american folk and gospel music. The I to IV becomes very dominant toward the end of the piece. Resulting in a series of plagal cadences, " the amen cadence". This gives it a hymn like vibe to the composition.

uptempo
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Re: Brouwer: Estudio 2 chords

Post by uptempo » Sat Feb 20, 2016 7:55 pm

And this seems very plausible too!

I must admit I feel that many of those chords have that familiar 'suspended' sound although not sure what they were. And with regards to the cadence, yes it is very strongly felt in the closing bars. Fascinating.

Anyway, why didn't Leo Brouwer just tell us. I bet that somewhere in his filing system is a perfect explanation of this, and other studies. :lol:
"Never believe what an artist says, only what they do" - Walter Sickert

Nick Cutroneo
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Re: Brouwer: Estudio 2 chords

Post by Nick Cutroneo » Sun Feb 21, 2016 4:03 pm

D.Cass wrote:Another veiw point would be the second chord is a Csus4 in 2nd inversion, G in the bass. This makes it a I to IV chord with the G being pedaled. Very common in american folk and gospel music. The I to IV becomes very dominant toward the end of the piece. Resulting in a series of plagal cadences, " the amen cadence". This gives it a hymn like vibe to the composition.
Probably a better analysis as you can clearly hear the resolution going back to your I chord within the 1st phrase.
Nick Cutroneo - Classical Guitarist, performer/teacher/suzuki instructor

Nick Cutroneo
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Re: Brouwer: Estudio 2 chords

Post by Nick Cutroneo » Sun Feb 21, 2016 4:05 pm

uptempo wrote:But I get the point about the bass running through the study as being some indicator to the structure.
Because the piece is essential a 4 part choral (the subtitle "coral" alludes to this), the bass notes need to be taken into consideration when you look at the harmony. The difference is that the basses aren't moving with the rhythm of the upper 3 voices.
Nick Cutroneo - Classical Guitarist, performer/teacher/suzuki instructor

uptempo
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Re: Brouwer: Estudio 2 chords

Post by uptempo » Sun Feb 21, 2016 6:44 pm

Thanks for the reply Nick.

I have learned a fair bit from this little study. Brouwer's studies have kept me going for a few months now and I have grown to like them.
"Never believe what an artist says, only what they do" - Walter Sickert

Nick Cutroneo
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Re: Brouwer: Estudio 2 chords

Post by Nick Cutroneo » Mon Feb 22, 2016 2:56 am

The Brouwer studies are amazing pieces of music. Not only for their pedagogical purposes in developing technique on the classical guitar, but there's so much music packed into such small pieces!
Nick Cutroneo - Classical Guitarist, performer/teacher/suzuki instructor

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Tonyyyyy
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Re: Brouwer: Estudio 2 chords

Post by Tonyyyyy » Thu Feb 25, 2016 9:20 pm

Nick Cutroneo wrote:.......there's so much music packed into such small pieces!
Absolutely

I remember in this study my teacher getting me to practice each chord emphasizing each note in turn. Then within a chord sequence considering which is the most significant note to emphasize at each moment

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Jonathan Lamb
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Re: Brouwer: Estudio 2 chords

Post by Jonathan Lamb » Fri Sep 30, 2016 1:59 pm

First started looking at these pieces in July this year, and only last week have I noticed that I had been playing the wrong chord in the last 2 quavers of measure 8.

That's to say, I thought I had 'sussed' the study was about rapid switching of fingers in the fret-stopping hand.
Unbeknownst to me until I realised... it's about way more than this.

FYI I had been playing:
----
-C- (1st finger)
-G- (open)
-E- (second finger)
----
----


instead of:
----
-C- (1st finger)
-Bb- (3rd finger)
-E- (2nd finger)
----
----

Funnily enough, once I started to correct myself here, I found the transition in bar 9 to subito piano, considerably easier to achieve (if not to accomplish... yet!)

My question about this piece: In measure 6 , where the third beat is syncopated, suggestions about whether this should be a pull-off onto the open Mi minor chord, or plucked??? Thanks!

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