Best workflow for audio software

Creating a home studio for recording the classical guitar. Equipment, software and recording techniques. Amplification for live performance.
kampfgolem
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Re: Best workflow for audio software

Post by kampfgolem » Fri Dec 09, 2016 5:21 pm

Sorry, I accidentally clicked on 'quote' instead of 'edit'. Anybody mind telling me please how to delete a post via a private message lol

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rojarosguitar
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Re: Best workflow for audio software

Post by rojarosguitar » Fri Dec 09, 2016 6:32 pm

kampfgolem wrote:Oh and regarding the use of reverb, the people here are right - using an aux send (it might be called an effects send on your DAW) is your best option for a "natural sound"
This is only true for a reverb that doesn't allow for wet/dry mixing.
If your reverb has it, it's ways overkill to install send and return buses just for squeezing your stereo through a bit of reverb. Just not necessary. But of course, everybody has his own style.

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Robert
Music is a big continent with different landscapes and corners. Some of them I do visit frequently, some from time to time and some I know from hearsay only ...

Alms
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Re: Best workflow for audio software

Post by Alms » Tue Feb 28, 2017 10:29 am

Kurt Penner wrote:
kampfgolem wrote:Oh and regarding the use of reverb, the people here are right - using an aux send (it might be called an effects send on your DAW) is your best option for a "natural sound"
But why?
In some DAW's, you can send the reverb to different areas of the left-channel and right-channel to give a recording a more "natural" sound according to your ears. Instead of having equal reverb on both right and left channels, you can have one type of reverb on the right channel and another type of reverb on the left channel so as to give a better stereo sound. Also, you "clip" one track of a stereo input so that it just a bit shorter in order to give the recording a "chorus" effect but not sound like you are using a "chorus" pedal, which would be a lot more "processed" and lose the more "natural" sound of a live classical guitar. The "aux send" option gives you control over where the reverb goes in the stereo field, which is very useful in that you only have a left and a right channel in recording. Sometimes, you don't want things blasting out of both sides of recording in equal measure. Also, you use "aux send" to apply different types of reverb or different amounts of reverb to your recording.
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rojarosguitar
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Re: Best workflow for audio software

Post by rojarosguitar » Tue Feb 28, 2017 8:22 pm

Speaking of reverbs: Most of the DAWs allow for a true stereo plugin where there are algorithms simulating the behaviour of sound in a 3D-room. I would always prefer such a reverb over dual mono, because there is no natural interaction of the channels in the latter.

Altiverb is certainly one of the best available, but almost every DAW have their own products that are at least workable if you don't exaggerate. One good trick to reduce the hardness and artificiality is to use a low pass filter on the HF tail of the frequency spectrum of the reverb, so that this kind of ringing typical for simpler reverbs is diminished.
Music is a big continent with different landscapes and corners. Some of them I do visit frequently, some from time to time and some I know from hearsay only ...

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Mach13
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Re: Best workflow for audio software

Post by Mach13 » Mon Mar 13, 2017 11:59 pm

3. Apply noise reduction with ReaFir effect...
6. Copy first track into tracks 2&3, and pan those hard left and right....
7. Apply reverb to all tracks individually....
8. Mix down to a stereo WAV file for export.

I've found there are so many ways to experiment with mixing, its a massive learning curve but worth the time you spend learning about it... here are my thoughts on some key parts of your process

3. Apply noise reduction with ReaFir effect... I'm not familiar with ReaFir, but my experience of noise reduction plugins is that they should be used with great care on instrument tracks (not so bad for vocals). If you feel you need it then... less is more, but i'd try listening to the track and bypassing the plugin back n forth to hear exactly what your are losing...

6. Copy first track into tracks 2&3, and pan those hard left and right... I've found better results not panning too extremely. Look at the EQ on these 'side 'tracks whilst its playing try removing much of the low frequencies for each of them with a Hi-pass filter -otherwise your final mix will sound 'muddy'. You could also try removing some lows from the center. If you have a 'delay' plugin try adding a small amount to either left or right track, This will widen the track for you. For me the side tracks benefit from being lower in volume than the center track

When you copy a track and pan it left and right you inevitably introduce problems with something called 'phase', this is where the left and right track audio can cancel each other out. It's worth googling to read up on as it has a big effect but is easily avoided. There are a number of ways to avoid tracks being out of phase but its essentially about track alignment.. If you have a good zoom function on the waveform for you tracks, zoom right in till the sharp peaks become rounded forms and make sure each track peak is perfectly aligned by nudging or (or grabbing and moving). There is a useful free plugin called phasebug which you can apply to the master bus to see how much of a phase problem you are getting

7. Apply reverb to all tracks individually via the FX send/receive.... I'd setup a new bus, call it reverb and add a reverb plugin to it. then use send options for each track and send them to this bus. This way you can; adjust the amount you send for each track, adjust the amount of reverb bus volume as well as the dry/wet mix and,,, EQ the reverb bus by dropping off some the low and high end frequencies. NB All the adjustments should be made when listening to the track so you hear the difference they make.

There are a few more things I was going to mention then I got distracted by the TV.. :oops: and erm have forgotten.. But here are the things I remember :
When mixing have a reference track at hand - this will be something similar to the end product you are aiming for. Its very easy to lose objectivity for what you hear.
If you have a mono toggle on your final output try switching between mono and stereo as you go (This where phase issues can show up)
Take regular ear breaks and save differing versions as you go, ears get tired and you can lose the sense of dynamics.
Make sure there are no red clipping lights on any of your meters before you mix down
Allow some head room for your mix to be mastered - -8 to -12db would be a good place to be

Hope this has been of some use

PS If you have a soundcloud account it would be great to hear how your music turns out. :casque:
Rgds Mark
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Kurt Penner
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Re: Best workflow for audio software

Post by Kurt Penner » Tue Mar 14, 2017 8:48 pm

For anyone still reading this old thread, I realized quickly that I was making things much too complicated with the above workflow. I got rid of the noise reduction and moved into my quietest room for recording. I stopped copying the track into two. I use just the single track and apply a bit of bass boost and a very carefully adjusted stereo reverb. Haven't found a better way so far, though I assume their are many different ways to success.

Next big move will be adding a second mic for true stereo sound at the source. If I had more money I might even do a third up the center, but my needs are modest and the gains are diminishing returns I think.

KP

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