Should I even bother recording in this room?

Creating a home studio for recording the classical guitar. Equipment, software and recording techniques. Amplification for live performance.
Nimo956
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Should I even bother recording in this room?

Postby Nimo956 » Wed Feb 15, 2017 2:57 am

I live in a 1 bedroom apt and only have the option of recording in the large open kitchen/living room. It's 18ft x 18ft with 15-16ft ceilings. There are hardwood floors, but I have a carpeted area rug in the living room. The apartment is on the ground floor right next to a busy street, so you can often hear cars going by. I was thinking of starting with a cheap setup of a single mic and audio interface. Is it even worth trying?

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David_Norton
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Re: Should I even bother recording in this room?

Postby David_Norton » Wed Feb 15, 2017 3:23 am

You'll never know until you try it.
David Norton
Salt Lake City, UT

Nimo956
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Location: Boston, MA

Re: Should I even bother recording in this room?

Postby Nimo956 » Thu Feb 16, 2017 8:50 pm

Ok, well I'm going to try! Just bought a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 and a Line Audio CM3 mic. We'll see how it goes; I've never done any recording before.

Kurt Penner
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Re: Should I even bother recording in this room?

Postby Kurt Penner » Thu Feb 16, 2017 10:02 pm

Imperfect recordings are 100% better than no recordings. It will be great fun. Don't sweat the ambient noises, just enjoy hearing yourself.

kp

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robin loops
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Re: Should I even bother recording in this room?

Postby robin loops » Thu Feb 16, 2017 10:25 pm

There are some measures you can take that might help. Make a recording Booth by draping blankets over microphone stands (boom stands turned horizontal to make a 'T' work great for this but anything you can drape a blanket over will work). Two of these in a v shape can work well to cut unwanted room reflections as well as noise from the street. Use a close miking technique with low gain settings (this will help reduce picking up ambient noise). Heavy drapes or curtains over the window as opposed to just blinds can help reduce noise from the street. Or you can hang a blanket over it or put some foam in there too. Even pillows will help. Can even prop pillows in the window frame. Also blankets or pillows on any hard furniture or surfaces to absorb noise and reduce reflections (room reverberations) can help.

Because this will result in a very dead tone you will need to add reverb post recording. Remember that less is better and add just enough to add some ambience. I alsomprefer to record in mono when dealing with sub par recording space as it's easier to position one mic where it will pick up less noise. The reverb added will add a bit of spacial stereo to compensate. Good monitoring headphones are very helpful as they will allow you to hear what the mic hears and can make finding optimal placement with least ambient noise much easier. Otherwise it's pretty much trial and error. Don't skimp on these.

You might also find a time when there is less traffic and other ambient noise and take advantage of the room and do stereo micing and get natural ambience without having to add reverb.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them.
-James-

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Erik Zurcher
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Re: Should I even bother recording in this room?

Postby Erik Zurcher » Thu Feb 16, 2017 10:39 pm

Just do it! Don't expect a professional recording, but use it as practise tool. My teacher recommended to listen to it the next day, not immediately after recording: "you will only hear your flaws. Wait till the next day and you will hear not only the flaws but also the good things."
Reedition Domingo Esteso by Conde Hermanos 2004; Kenny Hill, model Barcelona 2001
"While you try to master classical guitar, prepare for a slave's life: the guitar will forever be your master and you its slave".


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