book for self teaching

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chinola

book for self teaching

Postby chinola » Tue Apr 22, 2014 5:30 am

hello! I came across this book and was wondering if anyone has used it before and their opinions. I don't have a teacher and plan to teach myself how to play. I have some moderate ability with the piano and can read sheet music. The title of the book is: "Christopher Parkening Guitar Method - Volume 1: The Art and Technique of the Classical Guitar Book/CD Pack".

wianno

Re: book for self teaching

Postby wianno » Tue Apr 22, 2014 1:35 pm

Many forum members have commented on it and recommended it. Do a search to find the threads. Your familiarity with the piano and music notation should help you to move through a method book, like Parkening's, fairly quickly.

Jack

chinola

Re: book for self teaching

Postby chinola » Fri Apr 25, 2014 4:14 am

Thank you :) sounds like a great start. Will also search for other threads.

kmurdick
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Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2014 7:48 pm

Re: book for self teaching

Postby kmurdick » Sun Aug 24, 2014 8:34 am

Parkening's book is an excellent anthology, but not a good method for self-study IMO. The easiest part of learning the classical guitar (or any instrument for that matter) is the reading of notes on a page.

delayedMusician

Re: book for self teaching

Postby delayedMusician » Mon Dec 01, 2014 11:09 pm

kmurdick wrote: The easiest part of learning the classical guitar (or any instrument for that matter) is the reading of notes on a page.


Uh? I think I've lost you there.

delayedMusician

Re: book for self teaching

Postby delayedMusician » Mon Dec 01, 2014 11:12 pm

The Parkening was my first CG method and I certainly found it very good. I liked it. I have heard some people saying that it's difficult, but I didn't find it overly difficult, although it took work. But I had previous experience with music and with other instruments and knew advanced theory already, so I guess it depends where you are to start with. I would not say it is for complete beginners.

GuitarKarma

Re: book for self teaching

Postby GuitarKarma » Thu Dec 11, 2014 6:39 pm

Please pick up a Carulli book to start. Great way to build up technique lesson by lesson

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Evocacion
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Location: Cambridge, UK

Re: book for self teaching

Postby Evocacion » Fri Dec 12, 2014 11:53 pm

If you have found this site, then you don't need any other method book! Click the 'Lessons' link at the top of the page (in small print below the Board Index line) and check out the Delcamp lessons.

how69ss

Re: book for self teaching

Postby how69ss » Sun Dec 14, 2014 6:05 pm

That would be a great book to start with, imho.

Others can comment, but in that book the positioning of the right hand/wrist and the left hand thumb are the old Segovia style rather than the newer ergonomic approach that most instructors today seem to support. I'd get pumping nylon as it is great discussion and explanation of things like positioning, relaxation, form, etc. (Though the pieces, etc. are for intermediate players; it's still got great info on these basic things.)

And yes, Segovia played into his 90s with his right wrist cocked like that, but there are also lifetime smokers who live to be a hundred years old.
Just my two cents.

There's another thread on this same topic going on right now.

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glissando
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Location: Hobart, Australia

Re: book for self teaching

Postby glissando » Mon Dec 15, 2014 10:34 am

It gets a bit technical (at times it reads like a physics textbook!), but "The Art of Classical Guitar Playing" by Charles Duncan gives the most in-depth coverage I've found on right and left hand technique, nail filing, articulation, coordination, building speed, etc. Not the most entertaining reading, but certainly comprehensive. Note: although has a few snippets of music here and there, this book does NOT generally include exercises and studies to be played - it simply describes techniques using (mostly) words, supported by diagrams and photographs. I would recommend this book especially if you don't have access to a teacher who would normally be able to advise you on the more mechanical aspects of technique. Also, as mentioned previously, Pumping Nylon is an excellent book.
Katoh "Madrid" - European spruce/Indian rosewood

casy
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Joined: Tue Oct 21, 2014 5:57 pm
Location: Vero Beach, Fl.

Re: book for self teaching

Postby casy » Mon Dec 15, 2014 6:57 pm

Don't forget to include Fredrick M. Noad book one and book two. Consider Classical Guitar Pieces by Schott. It's contains 50 easy pieces in standard and tab form. Also get the free download of Segovia Scales. The Francisco Tarrega Collecton by Paul Henry is one of my must have books. It also shows pieces in standard and tab form. At any rate the Delcamp scores will easily keep anyone busy forever.

bgreene531
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Joined: Wed Mar 20, 2013 1:33 pm

Re: book for self teaching

Postby bgreene531 » Fri Jan 23, 2015 11:08 pm

Get a private teacher. Self teaching without having someone to address technique makes playing and getting a good tone difficult. I tried and it didn't work until I got a private teacher. Don't use the Parkening book for self instruction. I would go with the Carcassi or Carulli methods.

Mr.Rain
Posts: 11
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 4:43 pm

Re: book for self teaching

Postby Mr.Rain » Tue Dec 20, 2016 10:50 am

casy wrote:Don't forget to include Fredrick M. Noad book one and book two.


+1 on Noad.
I learnt with it, may not be the most didactic, but the pieces selection is very good, you will not feel like playing "boring stuff" but actually real pieces ..

Clovingo
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Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2017 9:19 pm

Re: book for self teaching

Postby Clovingo » Thu Jan 05, 2017 1:53 pm

Good book. I started on it as self-taught guitarist. Then got with a private teacher twice a month who put me back on Christopher's book 1, who also corrected my posture, finger planting, etc. Then he got me practicing Guiliani's right hand studies and Carcassi's etudes. Now working on Parkening's 2nd book.


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