Seeking recommendation: 'music theory for the novice'

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Ron Jones
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed May 10, 2017 3:54 pm
Location: Lawrenceville, Georgia

Seeking recommendation: 'music theory for the novice'

Post by Ron Jones » Fri May 12, 2017 3:06 am

I am new to the classical guitar, and aside from those obligatory trumpet lessons in middle school, I am new to music. However, now that my kids are busy with high school, I am keen to learn, and have an hour each day I can devote to this pursuit.

Aside from Lawrence McDonald's very excellent "Conservatory Tutor" set (I've been studying the first few pages to get a feel for his philosophy of use and am very impressed)... and I have Sagreras book one for exercises.

I have this insatiable curiosity, (a compulsion even) to understand both the "how" AND the "why." So... Another help I picked up was "Music Theory in One Lesson" by Ross Trottier. He also has some corresponding videos on his YouTube channel (Ross the Music Teacher) that seem quite helpful.

However, my dilemma is that (as good as Trottier's work is) I am a bit lower on the developmental scale than that. Can you recommend a resource that breaks music theory down "Romper Room Style," so that even a child can grasp the basics? I am not intimidated by my lack of knowledge (I cannot speak Portuguese either, but I know I could learn it), nor will I be offended at a resource designed for a 9-year old.

Thank you!

Ron Jones
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed May 10, 2017 3:54 pm
Location: Lawrenceville, Georgia

Re: Seeking recommendation: 'music theory for the novice'

Post by Ron Jones » Wed May 17, 2017 4:56 pm

I wanted to follow up with a recommendation for others who may be in the same boat. I picked up a copy of "Music Theory in One Lesson" by Ross Trottier. It's a short book (52 pages), and Trottier is an engaging presenter (his YouTube channel "Ross the Music Teacher," has good material).

Unfortunately, somewhere between the Chromatic scale, and the Major Scale, I got lost. Not his writing, Just a function of my ignorance.

After that minor frustration, I went in search of a more remedial text.

What I found (and actually needed) was not a remedial, but a comprehensive introduction, that was structured in a way that I could follow (We used to call this 'breaking it down "Romper Room style"'). I was rewarded with "Basic Music Theory, 4th edition" by Jonathan Harnum (he starts with the staff, the clefs, and rhythm, rather than scales).

It's informative, well written, and fun. Well... It's fun for ME, because I want to learn the things contained therein, and Harnum writes well (but my 13-year old son may not be as captivated).

Best to you.

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