Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

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GeoffB
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Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by GeoffB » Sun Aug 31, 2008 1:06 am

Hi zdz,

I see you've been with us for a while, but don't think you've introduced yourself yet. Would you like to call in at the Introduce Yourself section and tell us a few words about yourself, so we can give you a belated welcome and pass on the latest tips on how to get the best out of the forum? It would also be useful for you to try to make a few more posts, as otherwise with only 3 posts in nearly a year you may find your account will be deleted when underused accounts are next cleared away.

Regards,

Geoff
Classical Guitar Forum.

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catanga

Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by catanga » Sat Sep 06, 2008 5:01 am

I've just bought RICARDO IZNAOLA," Kitharologus, a technical workout manual for all guitarists", issued by Chanterelle 1997. I got it here in germany by amazon.
Seems t be very methodically. It content an organisation through all technical categories (seven categories, beginning with right hand technics. Its a training regimen over nine levels of proficiency.
Is there anyone who has expieriences with this book?
Catanga

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owl
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Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by owl » Sat Sep 06, 2008 5:10 am

catanga wrote: Is there anyone who has expieriences with this book?
Yes... it has been discussed several times... if you do a search of Guitar Classes you will find some info
Here is a link to start you off

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=30610&hilit=kitharologus

Owl
Never, ever give up!... I leave my songprint on your heart.

tom jobim

Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by tom jobim » Mon Sep 15, 2008 2:38 am

rrobbins wrote:I heard that Chord Chemistry by Ted Greene is an outstanding book. I am wondering if it is a good resource for classical guitarists.
i will venture to say that anything by ted greene is a valuable resource to any guitarist. unfortunately, he passed away about a year ago
and the jazz world lost probably its greatest guitar teacher. he was a phenomenal guitarist who would have been more well known if he hadn't been totally devoted to teaching. he did do one solo recording (i can't think of the title) and if you can get a copy of it snatch it up 'cause it burns. he played bass lines, chords, and single-note solos all at the same time. swingin' real hard, too. i would have given anything to get a lesson with this dude. the book you refer to is a great resource for anyone interested in chord voicing on the guitar and there are a few arrangements included which could be considered classical-like. i highly recommend it.
peace, tj

melodyky

Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by melodyky » Thu Sep 18, 2008 3:57 am

Consiliere wrote:A nice and useful collection.

I would suggest to add to the list the work of Pascual Roch - A Modern Method For The Guitar - School Of Tarrega in Three Volumes (1921).
This is now could be downloded as .pdf files free from here:

http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... itare.html .

thanks so much for your link, really cool! :merci:

Loris

Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by Loris » Wed Oct 01, 2008 3:57 am

I have just started learning the classical guitar and had to think long and hard about acquiring my first instructional manual. Key things are:
- understand how you like to learn
- look on Amazon for book reviews and feedback by others who have purchased the book.

The book you choose really depends upon how you like to learn. I went with Frederick Noad's Solo Guitar Playing volume 1. His book is very detailed and focuses on practicing technique. This is how I like to learn and have found the book very good. I find it also a good reference guide for when I am learning new music from other music sheets (i.e. when learning music per the score sheets on this website).

Due to the large number of books out there it is a hard choice, as you don't want to buy one that doesn't suit. You can get a general idea of how detailed instruction books are be seeing how many pages they take to explain key topics.

Hope this helps any new budding starters.

Ciao

sparrowhawk
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Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by sparrowhawk » Sat Oct 18, 2008 10:27 pm

The Suzuki method only works with a very dedicated parent. This is because for the first few years the student only learns by ear. The end result is a student with very good aural skills and excellent memorizing skills. If they work at it, they can learn to sight read well but because it is a skill learnt much later they tend not to be good at it. I have observed that Suzuki students also tend to lack initiative and the ability to work independently. It is a method suited to the very young child and in my opinion not that good for older children or adults. The books are quite good as repertoire, mostly works from the classical period and very few more modern pieces.

plainfaced

Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by plainfaced » Tue Oct 21, 2008 1:05 pm

Thanks for the list.
Now wheres that credit card of mine?
:x

RacerXen

Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by RacerXen » Fri Oct 24, 2008 6:22 pm

Hey good list, maybe someday I'll get a chance to read them all. I have some other books here I've read that have helped me a lot:

Edurado Fernandez: Technique>Mechanism>Learning, An Investigation into becoming a guitarist. This books is great, really heavy on the wording but his concepts of how technique is formed changed my ideas how the actual process of developing technique occurs. It also gives great ways to break down problem sections/spots in pieces and formulates ways on how to make those spots in exercises. He goes into detail regarding left/right hand techniques and explains what mechanisms are working in each hand.

The Natural Guitarist by Lee F.Ryan is also a favorite of mine. He explains relaxation in relation to how we play the guitar (Dynamic Relaxation). He goes into detail about how to concentrate and make your practice effective and goal oriented. I really liked his chapters about learning a piece, he presents step by step guidelines that can be used to learn a new piece of music. It's a very Zen driven read, but overall it has good information and makes you think critically about how you operate and learn music and the guitar.

This last one is theory based but still great, I found it in Spain, it's titled, Tratado de Armonia adaptado a la Guitarra (Treatise of Harmony applied to the Guitar) by Patricio Galindo.. This book is awesome hands down the best book I've ever read in regards to applied music theory on the guitar. Everything from Intervals to voice leading, to phrase structure in guitar works. It's broken up into 2 sections first section focuses on practical harmony, ie: How to play dominant, major, minor and chords, it also strings together chord progressions and how they function in tonal harmony I IV V I, along with secondary dominants, really good stuff. The second section of the book explores forms and phrase structures, with examples from actual studies/pieces from the guitar rep. I've read most of it (not all of it, it IS a really involved text with exercises and the such), and it has helped my fret board knowledge a lot. However it requires that I have a vast collection of guitar scores....which after 100 posts I should have here LOL but seriously the only draw back is that it is in Spanish and uses the fixed do systems as compared to our movable do and alphabetical pitch recognition system. I'm fluent in Spanish but I have yet to find this book translated to English. There are many books in the different languages which are great, I saw them in Europe, specifically Spain, but Germany had some great stuff to.

Guitar is technique but it's also how to think and hear music. Books like the last one I mentioned allow you to understand what's written on the page via practical knowledge of the language that is used in accordance to style, time period and harmonic structure. Are there any books in English like this? For guitar specifically? If so let me know.
Giovanni
Gio

gidu

Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by gidu » Wed Dec 03, 2008 2:06 pm

thanks to all who have posted here...
i am new in the CG world and in my place of residence have been unable to find a suitable CG instructor and your input is invaluable for finding some assistance to get going!

rgralnik

Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by rgralnik » Fri Jan 09, 2009 9:58 pm

Just to add another book to Frederick Noad's bibliography -

The Complete Idiot's Guide to Playing Guitar

(Maybe it should be called The Compleat Idiot's Guide...)

Danny Dishon

Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by Danny Dishon » Sat Jan 24, 2009 7:34 pm

Excellent list. I have many of these very same books. How to find the time to actually read and play them that is the rub!!! ;=)

I think that the Fredrick Harris series presents an excellent way to develop good sight reading habits and expand your repertoire. It is broken into sections of early guitar music, music from the classical period, and contemporary music, along with studies.

Christa

Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by Christa » Tue Jan 27, 2009 6:48 pm

Thank you for the list. I also have a few of them.
One of my favorite books is:
"Scott Tennant - Pumping Nylon"
The technical exercises help me a lot

hpatino

Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by hpatino » Tue Mar 03, 2009 11:57 pm

Useful exercises for tremolo

The Art of Tremolo
Ioannis Anastassakis
ISBN: 9780786607709

And don't forget the pdf by levels from Mr. Delcamp!

Hernando

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Re: Books on Studies and Instruction for Classical Guitar

Post by Chris NewVillage » Wed Mar 18, 2009 1:48 am

RacerXen wrote: Edurado Fernandez: Technique>Mechanism>Learning, An Investigation into becoming a guitarist. This books is great, really heavy on the wording but his concepts of how technique is formed changed my ideas how the actual process of developing technique occurs. It also gives great ways to break down problem sections/spots in pieces and formulates ways on how to make those spots in exercises. He goes into detail regarding left/right hand techniques and explains what mechanisms are working in each hand.
:D Thanks for the reco. Bookmarked.
Chris
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