Classical guitar books

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Larry McDonald
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Re: Classical guitar books

Postby Larry McDonald » Thu Oct 30, 2014 3:28 pm

Hi,
None of the texts mentioned so far are in the "Modern School". They are based on older techniques from the mid 1900's, and most don't teach individual mechanics in any organized fashion. In my opinion, most have significant sequential content errors, too. As Stanley Yates wrote a few years ago, "Nobody really teaches this way anymore, do they?"

Of those listed above, Aaron Shearer's new books (circa 1990 versions) get pretty close, edited by our own Tom Poore, who did a great job in my opinion. I call them "transitional". It fixes many of the sequential content errors and has superb explanations, but still uses some of the old style left-hand technique.

I only know of three methods that teach with the new, modern ergonomic technique/mechanics; Stanley Yates' new book "Classical Guitar Method" from Mel Bay, Richard Corr's excellent (and my favorite children's method) "Guitar Academy", and "The Conservatory Tutor" written by yours truly.

You will find that many of the recently published anthologies are now edited in the "Modern School", so if you are learning from one of the older methods, you may find the transition from beginning study to real repertoire frustrating.

I find there are good things in all methods; I especially like Parkening's Vol.2, which was written by his brother-in-law, by the way. (Well, it's not really a progressive method but a well articulated collection of intermediate level techniques).

But if methods are teaching antiquated beginning mechanics, I can't use them. I refuse to saddle students with blunt 20th century techniques, who are going to need a refined and articulate mastery for the music in our century.

All the best,
Lare
Dr. Lawrence A. McDonald, D.M.A., Art Kaplan Fellow
Author of The Conservatory Tutor for Guitar
2008 Michael Thames Cd/Br
Royal Conservatory Advanced Guitar Instructor
Royal Conservatory Advanced Theory Instructor

delayedMusician

Re: Classical guitar books

Postby delayedMusician » Thu Nov 27, 2014 10:40 am

Rory Falla wrote:I was advised to get the Aaron Shearer: Classical Guitar Technique Vol 1 and can thoroughly recommend it.


I thought that book was really weird. Virtually no music at all and a lot of blah blah and overkill about how many millimeters of distance there should be between the fingers, etc. Even Segovia said that the method was useless. Ok Segovia talked rubbish too sometimes, but in this instance I agree with him.

If anything it's the newer Shearer method that deserves a close look

Christopher Davis

Re: Classical guitar books

Postby Christopher Davis » Thu Feb 26, 2015 11:08 pm

wasn't the first book i used but i remember noad was good

Kirkland Gavin
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Re: Classical guitar books

Postby Kirkland Gavin » Sun Mar 22, 2015 7:45 pm

For me Julio S. Sagreras instruction books 1-6, are awesome it teaches how to play including scales and what not.

Very good stuff the 1st one I found by accident book 4-6 w/advances techniques that was a few years ago very awesome stuff.
I have miss placed it but found the stuff here on Mr. Delcamp sight, thank you sir your awesome.

There all kinds of books for which you are looking but I have found I have learned more using the J.S. Sagreras there graded beginner to advanced.

BrunoGS

Re: Classical guitar books

Postby BrunoGS » Sat May 09, 2015 5:07 am

You can find Sagreras books for free on the site. They are really progressive and musical. Sight-reading skills will benefit also. Take a look on that.

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Mark Farber
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Re: Classical guitar books

Postby Mark Farber » Sat May 09, 2015 2:16 pm

The Sagreras books strike me as being to "instructive" from the point of view of it takes a long tie before the student actually gets to play music (unless some repertoire pieces are inserted length way). The Parkening and Noad methods, on the other hand, use simple, recognizable tunes from the outset, rather than just scales and exercises, which I find makes practice much more enjoyable. Certainly a better way to learn for someone who's goal is to have fun, as opposed to becoming a professional musician, in my opinion.

lizhogg
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Re: Classical guitar books

Postby lizhogg » Mon Oct 05, 2015 4:16 pm

The Segovia scales are great for learning the fingerboard and right hand finger alternation.
Also, playing those (or any) scales in 3rds and 6ths is really helpful in learning the fingerboard/common intervals in guitar music.

Purdy Bear
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Re: Classical guitar books

Postby Purdy Bear » Fri Oct 30, 2015 7:27 pm

I've just ordered A Tune A Day for Guitar, now I don't have experience with that book, but I did use Tune a day Flute to do that instrument a few years back with a private tutor and got to grade 4. If it's the same you learn the fingering and the notation at the same time, but we shall see. I'll edit this post once I've seen it as it's in the mail as we speak.

Thanks for the recommendations for the other two I'll go take a look see. For an ideal book for me I want to learn the fret positions along with the notation as I go, rather then the fret board and tablature. I've found the later system highly frustrating when learning the Ukulele.

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abielikesu
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Re: Classical guitar books

Postby abielikesu » Wed Nov 11, 2015 12:03 pm

I have used the Noad's book and it's very very good.
- Abie
(ES)(EN) No hay cosas imposibles, sino hombres incapaces ...
------------------------
Guitarras: 2010 Alberto Paredes (Pino suizo), Antonio Carvalho 4C (Cedro)

Paul Berge
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Re: Classical guitar books

Postby Paul Berge » Wed Nov 11, 2015 2:59 pm

Larry McDonald wrote:But if methods are teaching antiquated beginning mechanics, I can't use them. I refuse to saddle students with blunt 20th century techniques, who are going to need a refined and articulate mastery for the music in our century.


Larry, I'm very interested in hearing more about the deficiencies in older method books. I'm mostly self-taught and have used Pumping Nylon, Segreras, Noad as well as the collections found here on Delcamp. I imagine this could lead to a very lengthy discussion, but would you be able to outline some of the differences between the "blunt 20th century techniques" when compared to more modern methods?

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Larry McDonald
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Re: Classical guitar books

Postby Larry McDonald » Wed Nov 11, 2015 4:49 pm

Sure. You can search within our forum for:
- "Straight right-wrist" vs "deviated/Segovia/abducted/bent/ wrist".
- Be sure to look-up "4th finger approach". This is a pretty big deal, in my opinion.
- Left-thumb position is hotly contested, but I'm a convert to the new "Behind or to the left of the first finger school".
- And my favorite, "2 hours of scales will teach you everything you need to know about technique". :roll:
- Most of the 20th century method books show a pronated left-hand when demonstrating where to put your finger for each note. A few of the new 21 century books have this corrected.
- The old books almost always show too much distance between the left hand and the neck.
- back-chaining.
-Open Hand school vs Flat Hand school

On another related note...
I try to keep to this sequence when I teach.

Mechanics combine into techniques (or segments), which combine into phrases. -Lawrence McDonald

Mechanics (defn) -a single motion in one part of the body. These need to be as physio-mechanically efficient and as effortless as possible. This is probably the most critical phase of instruction. Efficiency equals security and speed. Eg., a single rest stroke, or left-hand finger-fall velocity. If your core mechanism has too much inefficiency and dysfunctional tension, your learning curve will be extended, and frustrating.

Techniques/Segments (defn) -a combination/grouping of 5-9 mechanics. Mechanics don't always combine nicely. There will need to be compromises. For example, when playing more than one finger on the same fret, as is found in the common "D" chord, those of us with bigger hands must momentarily pronate (a counter-clockwise rotation the left wrist), an fortunate but necessary mechanic which causes the 3rd finger to straighten beyond it's most normal flexion, which can mess-up the internal "fret-mapping" in the brain (called proprioception). Not the best, but the compromise works.

Advanced Techniques (defn) -combinations of 5-9 previously learned automatic techniques (groups of techniques, which are groups of mechanics).

Phrase (defn) -Groups of techniques that end in a cadence. Since I teach back-chaining, I like to think that most of my efforts are at the phrase level, and that I let the music tell us (the student and I) what we need to work on. This allows us to discover our inefficiencies and practice them in a musically satisfying way.

I could go on and on, but this is enough for now. All the best,
Lare
Dr. Lawrence A. McDonald, D.M.A., Art Kaplan Fellow
Author of The Conservatory Tutor for Guitar
2008 Michael Thames Cd/Br
Royal Conservatory Advanced Guitar Instructor
Royal Conservatory Advanced Theory Instructor

Paul Berge
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Re: Classical guitar books

Postby Paul Berge » Wed Nov 11, 2015 5:30 pm

Perfect, that is exactly what I was looking for and should keep me busy searching for a while. :merci:

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MattPM
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Re: Classical guitar books

Postby MattPM » Fri Nov 20, 2015 11:15 pm

Purdy Bear wrote:I've just ordered A Tune A Day for Guitar, now I don't have experience with that book, but I did use Tune a day Flute to do that instrument a few years back with a private tutor and got to grade 4. If it's the same you learn the fingering and the notation at the same time, but we shall see. I'll edit this post once I've seen it as it's in the mail as we speak.



I started out on the Tune A Day books - vol 1,2,3(the older versions). Great little set of books with good pace of progression. Good music included also introducing the reader to Sor, Carcassi, Carulli and an array of folk tunes.

kmurdick
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Re: Classical guitar books

Postby kmurdick » Fri Nov 20, 2015 11:48 pm

Daraz82 wrote:Hi, i would like to know what is the best Classical Guitar instruction book to buy for a beginner?


My videos demonstrate the Aaron Shearer books.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... D7FA3F7B59

Purdy Bear
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Re: Classical guitar books

Postby Purdy Bear » Sat Nov 21, 2015 10:36 am

MattPM wrote:
Purdy Bear wrote:I've just ordered A Tune A Day for Guitar, now I don't have experience with that book, but I did use Tune a day Flute to do that instrument a few years back with a private tutor and got to grade 4. If it's the same you learn the fingering and the notation at the same time, but we shall see. I'll edit this post once I've seen it as it's in the mail as we speak.



I started out on the Tune A Day books - vol 1,2,3(the older versions). Great little set of books with good pace of progression. Good music included also introducing the reader to Sor, Carcassi, Carulli and an array of folk tunes.


Matt, I love those books. With the recommendations of the board, I''ve added two of the Noad books and also Parkenings. I hope to cross over each reference as I go.


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