Tuning by ear - Test your pitch differentiating ability here

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Tom Poore
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Location: South Euclid, Ohio, USA

Re: Tuning by ear - Test your pitch differentiating ability here

Post by Tom Poore » Sun Apr 30, 2017 11:53 am

Using my laptop speaker, I got .825. The test told me that’s better than 75% of the population. Tried it again with headphones. Whittled my score down to .43125, which puts me in the 94th percentile. So apparently I’m hanging in there. I once read that anyone over 50 should never question the hearing of a younger person. Being well over that age, it’s nice to know that I’m not yet pitch deaf.

Liked this test enough that I posted the link on my website.

Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA

celestemcc
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Re: Tuning by ear - Test your pitch differentiating ability here

Post by celestemcc » Sun Apr 30, 2017 5:10 pm

1.2 but with speakers. But it's actually not that hard to tune a guitar by ear, if you listen for the beats resonating in the body...
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1978 Ramirez 1a cedar

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Sharon Vizcaino
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Re: Tuning by ear - Test your pitch differentiating ability here

Post by Sharon Vizcaino » Sat May 06, 2017 4:57 pm

1.2, kind of sad, considering I'm only 22... But well, not very surprising, I've never been great at tuning by ear.
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Daniel Penalva
Student of the online lessons
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Location: Brazil SP

Re: Tuning by ear - Test your pitch differentiating ability here

Post by Daniel Penalva » Sat Jul 22, 2017 9:37 pm

over 3

Does that mean cant i tune by ear ?

(2.4 - 1.8 with increased focus)

Peskyendeavour
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Re: Tuning by ear - Test your pitch differentiating ability here

Post by Peskyendeavour » Sat Jul 22, 2017 10:22 pm

Actually your ear can be trained to tune.
When I was very young like 2, I couldn't tell pitch or sing in tune, or control my voice box I guess not knowing what note accuracy meant but I did try to sing stuff so my older siblings were teasing me.
I never had perfect pitch but through life joined better and better choirs and my pitch improved.
My accuracy improved with practice and I can tune by ear to relatively accurately.
I'm still not perfect pitched but in relative terms I can tune say the entire guitar relative to itself.
I think if you just keep practicing it try it without tuner each time then listen again to the correction with, over time you might be surprised.
The ear is just another muscle (kind of) it can be trained.

DCGillrich
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Re: Tuning by ear - Test your pitch differentiating ability here

Post by DCGillrich » Sat Sep 02, 2017 6:27 am

I am not an experienced ear tuner. I got 4.5 Hz (15.5 cents) the first time a few weeks ago, 2.25 Hz (7.8 cent) this afternoon, and then 2.4 Hz (8.3 cents) this evening. So perhaps with more practice, I will become perfect!

A discussion on cents and 'just noticeable difference s pitch (jnd)' can be found at http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hb ... cents.html. It says 'Rossing describes measurements of pitch discrimination with pure tones at about 80 dB for frequencies between 1 and 4 kHz. The jnd is found to be about 0.5% of the pure tone frequency, which corresponds to about 8¢ . He [Rossing] also states that the jnd has been found to depend upon the frequency, the sound level, the duration of the tone, the suddenness of the frequency change, the musical training of the listener, and the method of measurement.' Elsewhere, the article also suggests 'You can hear about a nickel's worth of difference' which means jnd (pitch) = 5 cents (obviously US money).

Reference: Rossing, Thomas D., The Science of Sound 2nd ed, Addison-Wesley 1990

Cheers... Richard

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