Rest stroke vs. Free stroke

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Paul Janssen
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Re: Rest stroke vs. Free stroke

Postby Paul Janssen » Mon Oct 31, 2016 3:07 am

Adam wrote:Tom, great performance of that Fantasia.


I agree - very nice performance.

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scottszone
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Re: Rest stroke vs. Free stroke

Postby scottszone » Fri Dec 30, 2016 7:43 pm

I wonder if it is worth it to distinguish between types of rest stroke? I see some players use a heavy rest stroke where them almost slam into the adjacent string with force, and other like Segovia seem to use a lighter stroke where they lightly touch and rest on the following string. I've seen and heard a lot of sloppy rest stroke players that appear to use the former approach and it seems to lead to additional noise or inaccuracies.
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2handband
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Re: Rest stroke vs. Free stroke

Postby 2handband » Sun Jan 01, 2017 11:36 pm

This is a dumb argument.

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Larry McDonald
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Re: Rest stroke vs. Free stroke

Postby Larry McDonald » Mon Jan 02, 2017 4:57 pm

Bill B wrote:I start the student with rest stroke. Then 5 minutes later we do free stroke.


Yep. This is what I do as well. The first three lessons I teach to beginners is right-hand only (that's about as much as they will tolerate.) Then I include the left hand on one note only ("A" on the 3rd string.)

As an aside, no one has touched upon why a rest stroke sounds more rich than a free stroke. My theory (and it's only a theory) is that the free stroke is mostly the sound of the string, whereas rest-strokes include the sound of the string and the sympathetic resonance of the sound board. This is due to the direction of the sound waves. A free stroke sound wave direction approach 90 degrees out-of-phase with the top of the guitar. If your physics teacher assigned you to create the stupidest design for an instrument, you only need to open your guitar case and point.) The wave direction of a rest-stroke is more in phase with the soundboard, which is the same direction of the hammers on the piano (this is why the piano is louder and more powerful than the guitar, and displaced the guitar in the 19 century concert hall, all in my opinion.) Thankfully, the Spanish guitarists continued to develop the rest-stroke sound (again, opinion).

If there are any luthiers still reading this thread, I'd love to hear from you.
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BugDog
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Re: Rest stroke vs. Free stroke

Postby BugDog » Mon Jan 02, 2017 5:41 pm

scottszone wrote:I wonder if it is worth it to distinguish between types of rest stroke? I see some players use a heavy rest stroke where them almost slam into the adjacent string with force, and other like Segovia seem to use a lighter stroke where they lightly touch and rest on the following string. I've seen and heard a lot of sloppy rest stroke players that appear to use the former approach and it seems to lead to additional noise or inaccuracies.


This is a valid observation. All rest strokes are not created equal. Neither are free strokes for that matter.

Those that advocate the free stroke, often describe what is sometimes described as a push stroke when they want a rest stroke sound. My own observation and practice is that the rest stroke can also be manipulated to sound like a free stroke.

In the end it's about getting the sound you want, and that's done by manipulation of the string with the finger. Whether it's a free stroke or a rest stroke is defined only by if "it touches the lower string". The string being played doesn't really care that much about what the stroke was called.
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johnd
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Re: Rest stroke vs. Free stroke

Postby johnd » Mon Jan 02, 2017 6:46 pm

I should not enter this discussion since it's only about a year since I bought a classical guitar and am slowllllyyyy teaching myself.

Awhile back I did read about free and rest strokes so I try to use both. Then I found another thing which all of you already know - there is a big difference on what position in relation to the sound hole you are plucking the strings. That in combination with free stroke and rest stroke produces a variety of sound I did not know was there. Ahhhhh! Learning is such a slow process.

Joey Grimaldi
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Re: Rest stroke vs. Free stroke

Postby Joey Grimaldi » Tue Feb 14, 2017 5:47 am

Perhaps if some spent the same amount of time practicing rest strokes as they do coming up for reasons not to use them they would begin to understand how great they sound and how useful they are.

Luis_Br
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Re: Rest stroke vs. Free stroke

Postby Luis_Br » Tue Feb 14, 2017 10:34 am

BugDog wrote:
scottszone wrote:I wonder if it is worth it to distinguish between types of rest stroke? I see some players use a heavy rest stroke where them almost slam into the adjacent string with force, and other like Segovia seem to use a lighter stroke where they lightly touch and rest on the following string. I've seen and heard a lot of sloppy rest stroke players that appear to use the former approach and it seems to lead to additional noise or inaccuracies.

Carlevaro used to teach 5 different strokes and none of them are related to rest vs free dichotomy (you find their description in his book "School of Guitar", or at youtube in Alfredo Escande's channel).


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