Sight Reading

A "classroom" environment for exchanging Technical Questions & Answers, How-To's, music theory concepts, etc.
Dustin McKinney
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 110
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2016 4:00 pm
Location: Kansas City, Missouri

Sight Reading

Postby Dustin McKinney » Thu Nov 10, 2016 5:59 pm

Does you have a recommendation for sight-reading materials? I need to work on my ability to read in positions. Thanks in advance!
Kremona Fiesta FC

GravyDave
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2016 6:37 pm
Location: Buffalo, NY

Re: Sight Reading

Postby GravyDave » Thu Nov 10, 2016 9:40 pm

Hi! I've been using 2 sources. Sagreras Guitar Lesson Books, and Benedicts Sight Reading for the Classical Guitar. I feel weird giving advice, not being an expert, but these 2 sources have helped me tremendously.
I studied piano in childhood and having learned to read music before playing guitar, I have had tough time since I see a keyboard when reading.
A friend of mine whose first language is Spanish told me she always has to translate everything in her head. Same deal.
Its been a slow process, but, luckily I have had the desire enough to learn, that playing some very easy exercises isn't as bad as I thought it would be.

Hope that was a bit of a help.

-Dave

User avatar
Alain Cloutier
Posts: 436
Joined: Sat Feb 16, 2013 9:42 pm
Location: Puvirnituq Canada

Re: Sight Reading

Postby Alain Cloutier » Thu Nov 10, 2016 11:22 pm

A classic: Carcassi's method. Sor's too. I used to just read pages after pages in them just to practice my reading ability.

I'm sure they're easy to find for free on the net.

User avatar
souldier
Posts: 564
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 4:45 pm

Re: Sight Reading

Postby souldier » Fri Nov 11, 2016 12:47 am

Mel Bay's deluxe guitar position studies has exercises to play in positions up and down the neck. One thing that has helped me is simply memorizing all the notes on the staff, and knowing the several places where you can find these notes along the fingerboard. Spend time memorizing every single note on the fingerboard everyday so that you can instantly recognize what each note is in each fret.
"Success grants its rewards to a few, but is the dream of the multitudes.
Excellence is available to all, but is accepted only by a few." - Christopher Parkening

2014 James Frieson | Swiss Spruce . Madagascar Rosewood

Steve Langham
Posts: 146
Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2015 11:55 am
Location: Melbourne

Re: Sight Reading

Postby Steve Langham » Fri Nov 11, 2016 1:02 am

I like the Robert Benedict books. Starts out simple and progresses nicely and introduces position 2,3,5 later on in book 1.
Of course, can just grab some method book as per recommendations above.

User avatar
TomPage
Posts: 469
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2006 1:07 pm
Location: The land of pleasant living

Re: Sight Reading

Postby TomPage » Fri Nov 11, 2016 1:15 am

And, of course, the collection of scores for each grade level in Mr. Delcamp's collection. I don't think you need anything else.

Dustin McKinney
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 110
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2016 4:00 pm
Location: Kansas City, Missouri

Re: Sight Reading

Postby Dustin McKinney » Fri Nov 11, 2016 4:30 am

Thank you all very much for the suggestions!
Kremona Fiesta FC

flat3rd
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Oct 07, 2016 6:43 pm

Re: Sight Reading

Postby flat3rd » Fri Nov 11, 2016 3:10 pm

I've been using "Reading Studies for Guitar" by William Leavitt. Its from Berklee Press, it progresses nicely in difficulty and covers the first 7 positions in all keys. I'm still working through it, but I like it so far. My instructor at the time gave me the advice to set your metronome to 80 and just read. The purpose is not to hit every note, but to drill you and to help you recover in time. Totally frustrating :)

Dustin McKinney
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 110
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2016 4:00 pm
Location: Kansas City, Missouri

Re: Sight Reading

Postby Dustin McKinney » Fri Nov 11, 2016 3:17 pm

flat3rd wrote:I've been using "Reading Studies for Guitar" by William Leavitt. Its from Berklee Press, it progresses nicely in difficulty and covers the first 7 positions in all keys. I'm still working through it, but I like it so far. My instructor at the time gave me the advice to set your metronome to 80 and just read. The purpose is not to hit every note, but to drill you and to help you recover in time. Totally frustrating :)



I saw that book on amazon and was intrigued. It's not too expensive. I might give it an order.
Kremona Fiesta FC

User avatar
TomPage
Posts: 469
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2006 1:07 pm
Location: The land of pleasant living

Re: Sight Reading

Postby TomPage » Sat Nov 12, 2016 4:17 pm

Just remember that Leavitt is not writing explicitly for classical guitar. He is writing for jazz/session musician pick-style players. That does not make it useless for classical, just not its intent.

User avatar
GJW
Posts: 38
Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2016 12:40 pm
Location: Kent UK

Re: Sight Reading

Postby GJW » Sun Nov 20, 2016 10:26 am

I've found it helps to sight read without a guitar in your hand, take a score to read in bed....

G
Yamaha CG120, Takamine EC132SC, Perl Gold lute style classical
2 x Westone electrics
2 x Fender F series 6 string (steel), Fender F series 12 string
Yamaha Bass
2 x Sitar (from India/Pakistan)
Kokle (from Latvia), Geierleyer (from Germany) and a Ukulele

Rick-in-Annapolis
Posts: 521
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2007 10:22 am
Location: Annapolis, MD (USA)

Re: Sight Reading

Postby Rick-in-Annapolis » Sun Nov 20, 2016 1:36 pm

As Tom said, don't overlook the list of scores here at Delcamp. They are graded from very easy to difficult. You should be able to sight read the first levels fairly easily and work your way up to the more difficult levels as you are able.

User avatar
GJW
Posts: 38
Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2016 12:40 pm
Location: Kent UK

Re: Sight Reading

Postby GJW » Mon Nov 21, 2016 10:38 am

Also. get yourself a big pad of blank manuscript paper and a pen and write out scales while playing them, try writing out your favourite pieces....attack the problem from the reverse direction as it were....
Yamaha CG120, Takamine EC132SC, Perl Gold lute style classical
2 x Westone electrics
2 x Fender F series 6 string (steel), Fender F series 12 string
Yamaha Bass
2 x Sitar (from India/Pakistan)
Kokle (from Latvia), Geierleyer (from Germany) and a Ukulele

2handband
Posts: 904
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2015 7:31 pm

Re: Sight Reading

Postby 2handband » Thu Nov 24, 2016 3:38 am

Learn to sight-sing. That'll pay off hugely... once you can quickly interpret the notes on the page into a melody in your head translating it to the fretboard becomes almost intuitive, at least if your ear is any good.

Maybe it's because I'm from a world where learning by ear is the way it's done, but I think learning to translate the stuff on the page into a position on an instrument is a hugely wrong road. Translate it into a melody in your head and putting it onto your instrument should be quick and easy, at least if your ear is good.

Dustin McKinney
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 110
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2016 4:00 pm
Location: Kansas City, Missouri

Re: Sight Reading

Postby Dustin McKinney » Thu Nov 24, 2016 6:54 pm

2handband wrote:Learn to sight-sing. That'll pay off hugely... once you can quickly interpret the notes on the page into a melody in your head translating it to the fretboard becomes almost intuitive, at least if your ear is any good.

Maybe it's because I'm from a world where learning by ear is the way it's done, but I think learning to translate the stuff on the page into a position on an instrument is a hugely wrong road. Translate it into a melody in your head and putting it onto your instrument should be quick and easy, at least if your ear is good.


I agree! I teach choir, and sight singing is the biggest skill that I teach. I also have a Masters degree is Music Theory, and aural development was a major part of my program. For me, I have issues with instant recognition of hand position. I can hear the song in my head before playing a not, but I fumble around everywhere past 5th position.
Kremona Fiesta FC


Return to “Classical Guitar Classes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot], Dan Seufert and 9 guests