Sight Reading

A "classroom" environment for exchanging Technical Questions & Answers, How-To's, music theory concepts, etc.
2handband
Posts: 948
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2015 7:31 pm

Re: Sight Reading

Post by 2handband » Thu Nov 24, 2016 9:33 pm

Dustin McKinney wrote:For me, I have issues with instant recognition of hand position. I can hear the song in my head before playing a not, but I fumble around everywhere past 5th position.
First off, memorize the fretboard. You need to have it down cold in standard tuning. Tip: memorize the dotted frets, and the rest kinda fills itself in.

Secondly, learn scale patterns. NOT the Segovia scales which as near as I can tell are more technique exercises than practical scale patterns to use in making music, but the kind of movable patterns jazz and rock players use. That'll give you an intuitive sense of the guitar's intervallic structure (which is complicated a bit by the asymmetrical nature of the tuning), and you'll be able to much more easily place melodies quickly on the board.

Lovemyguitar
Posts: 2922
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2011 5:50 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Sight Reading

Post by Lovemyguitar » Fri Nov 25, 2016 2:12 am

Dustin McKinney wrote:... I have issues with instant recognition of hand position. I can hear the song in my head before playing a note, but I fumble around everywhere past 5th position.
Another thing to do, at least at first, is to memorise the 7th fret notes, and the 12th fret notes (same as open strings!), and then it makes it much easier to work back and forth between those frets (since the spacing between notes is the same as it is from 0-5th fret). If you don't have a fret dot at 7, you can make one, and 12 is obvious!, and that will give you a visual cue for the notes on those frets. Of course, the more pieces you play at the higher frets, the more practice you'll get, and the easier it will become (I have never been a "just memorise the whole fretboard" kind of person: I learned it best by playing pieces -- but of course, everyone is different).

User avatar
scottszone
Posts: 102
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 5:19 pm
Location: Austin, Texas

Re: Sight Reading

Post by scottszone » Fri Dec 30, 2016 6:58 pm

One thing that helped my reading skills more than anything else is teaching. The daily reading with students in lessons helps reinforce the skill until it is an instinct. Problem areas include position shifts, open vs fretted notes, odd left hand fingering, or intricate right hand patterns. Spending a little time reviewing the score and marking trouble spots beforehand helps immensely. The more you do it mindfully, the easier it gets.

Btw, I was a horrible sight reader when I started college. I found reading rhythms accurately even harder than memorizing the pitches. Dotted notes, syncopated eighth or sixteenth notes were trouble. Daily practice and a teacher quickly improved my reading for the better.
2006 Manuel Contreras II C-5 Cedar/IRW
2016 Cordoba C7-CE Cedar/IRW
2006 Cordoba GK Studio Spruce/Cypress

YenVoonChin
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2017 1:01 pm
Location: Shah Alam - Malaysia

Re: Sight Reading

Post by YenVoonChin » Sat Jan 14, 2017 5:04 pm

I learn sight reading by playing scales, arpeggios & simple single note pieces
2010 Yamaha C-40
2017 Cordoba C10

quavers
Posts: 63
Joined: Thu Mar 17, 2016 10:39 pm

Re: Sight Reading

Post by quavers » Sun Jan 15, 2017 6:24 pm

I am a pretty good sight reader. But the a better skill would be sight singing and the mastery of solfege. I am sure that if I can sing it, I will be able to play it. I would also be able better memorize it. Sight reading is a great skill, but not the only skill a musician should master. Memorization and the integrated use of sight singing are probably the only roadway to developing a true legato. I myself have pretty much only acquired a good sight reading facility - and I am acutely aware of what is lacking. Younger people embarking on CG studies should hone their memorization and sight singing skills as an integral part of their training.

Dustin McKinney
Posts: 130
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2016 4:00 pm
Location: Kansas City, Missouri

Re: Sight Reading

Post by Dustin McKinney » Sun Jan 15, 2017 6:33 pm

quavers wrote:I am a pretty good sight reader. But the a better skill would be sight singing and the mastery of solfege. I am sure that if I can sing it, I will be able to play it. I would also be able better memorize it. Sight reading is a great skill, but not the only skill a musician should master. Memorization and the integrated use of sight singing are probably the only roadway to developing a true legato. I myself have pretty much only acquired a good sight reading facility - and I am acutely aware of what is lacking. Younger people embarking on CG studies should hone their memorization and sight singing skills as an integral part of their training.
I couldn't agree more! I am a choir teacher, and I teach sightsinging. I have a masters in theory, and my Graduate Assistantship had me teaching both music theory and sightsinging to undergraduate music majors. I have no issues with solfege and singing, the issue is making my instrument play what I hear in my head. I developed the ability to look at music and hear it without needing to play. My problem is recognizing the music and putting my hands in the right position. I need the muscle memory work.
Francisco Navarro 630mm Student Classical (Spruce)
Kremona Fiesta FC

quavers
Posts: 63
Joined: Thu Mar 17, 2016 10:39 pm

Re: Sight Reading

Post by quavers » Sun Jan 15, 2017 7:01 pm

Everyone has individual limitations. I do not have the dexterity of a younger person, there are things that I have had to face that I will never be able to do; the dexterity simply is not there. However, my posted comment, was to share with everyone what I believe to be the most limiting factors that are not so physical in nature. I was just pointing out that sight reading is only one skill but not all that important when there are so many others that form a musician.

Joe de V
Posts: 1853
Joined: Mon Nov 05, 2007 12:34 am
Location: Northern California USA

Re: Sight Reading

Post by Joe de V » Sun Jan 15, 2017 7:13 pm

The Benedict's Sight reading music volumes already mentioned here are very good in addition to other volumes that you may want to check out.
Published volumes that could help improve sight reading are'...
1:Shearer's "Basic Elements of Music Theory for the Guitar" - Supplement 2 of Classical Guitar Technique and... "Guitar Note Speller"
2:The 2010 edition of "how to read music" CD included, by Rod Fogg a musician and teacher published by Metro Books by arrangement with Outline Press. One of my favorites for teaching and reviewing my music reading skills.
3:A short but very informative and easy to follow volume published by http://www.pinguin.com ..."The Basic Guide To How To Read Music" by musician and teacher Helen Cooper. This is a more comprehensive guide since is written to teach how to read the complete musical staff, both Treble and bass Clef applicable to guitar as well as other musical instruments.Cost in USA is under $10. A good reference in a music library.
Note:
I have accumulated an extensive music library for CG Instruction, but for learning to sight-read music I find them lacking in Teaching to sight read as they limit themselves to the guitar treble clef and only to the musical samples they use for exercises.




















treble clef

Return to “Classical Guitar Classes”