List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

A "classroom" environment for exchanging Technical Questions & Answers, How-To's, music theory concepts, etc.
twistedblues
Posts: 192
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 7:48 pm

List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by twistedblues » Wed Feb 15, 2017 6:03 pm

Where can we find a list of Rhythms?

User avatar
guitareleven
Posts: 688
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2011 5:48 pm

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by guitareleven » Wed Feb 15, 2017 8:47 pm

A much shorter list would be of rhythms not used in Classical Guitar Music. Not only would it be short, but the validity of any entry on that list could likely be challenged by example.

twistedblues
Posts: 192
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 7:48 pm

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by twistedblues » Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:05 pm

True! I was thinking there is probably some sort of classical guitar "rudiments" list that would include some common Rhythms used in different styles of classical guitar. Perhaps by country

User avatar
Tom Poore
Posts: 1034
Joined: Fri Aug 25, 2006 4:00 pm
Location: South Euclid, Ohio, USA

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by Tom Poore » Thu Feb 16, 2017 2:37 pm

Get a copy of “Rhythmic Training” by Robert Starer. (You can buy it for less than $10.) Work through it diligently. When you’re done, you’ll know what you’re doing.

Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA

Salvador
Posts: 202
Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2015 10:59 am
Location: Asia

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by Salvador » Thu Feb 16, 2017 3:03 pm

You can practice with a metronome, or play duets. I learn rhythm by playing a lot of popular songs before i studied classical guitar. I get the chord of a song and play along with the song. That's how i practiced rhythm when i was younger, and when i studied classical guitar i already know how to play on tempo.

Or you can practice a classical guitar piece and play along some youtube videos. Example: Recuerdos de la Alhambra, i play along with the recordings of John Williams, Julian Bream or even Yepes but his tremolo was very fast.

twistedblues
Posts: 192
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 7:48 pm

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by twistedblues » Thu Feb 16, 2017 6:40 pm

Thanks guys. It would be even cooler for me to see Rhythms by style. A good example would be

What does the rhythm look like for let's say a Cadenza
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadenza

Dirck Nagy
Posts: 505
Joined: Sat Sep 28, 2013 4:47 pm
Location: Wisconsin, USA

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by Dirck Nagy » Sun Feb 19, 2017 1:04 am

twistedblues wrote:Thanks guys. It would be even cooler for me to see Rhythms by style. A good example would be

What does the rhythm look like for let's say a Cadenza
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadenza
Hello "twistedblues".

I think you might be asking a question that can't be answered. "Classical" music, or "Art Music" is a vast subject consisting of many many genres spread across a wide geographical area for over a thousand years.

Now, inside the realm of "art music", there are lots of sub-categories, some of which might very well have specific rhythms associated with them. For example, composers of the Baroque period used a variety of specific rhythms derived from dance forms of the day, i.e. the "Bouree" was a vigorous dance form in duple time with a "short short Long, short short Long," pattern of accents. A little later, in the 1800s, there was the "Waltz", which was a dance form in triple time, some slow, some fast, usually with a strong downbeat.

There are literally thousands of different beat patterns used in various styles of music.

A Cadenza is something completely different. It is a solo section, usually right at the end of a Concerto, where the soloist gets to show off a bit. Historically it was improvised, but there are lots of written-out cadenzas by famous performers which are sometimes copied by other performers. And sometimes, the composers will write it out themselves. So a cadenza isnt a "form" with a specific rhythm. A good cadenza will incorporate elements from the concerto it appears in.

(A contemporary example of a cadenza would be at the end of a rock concert where the band hits a big chord and holds it, while the lead guitar player goes "wheedle wheedle wheedle wheedle" for a while, then the entire band makes a big "boom boom crash" and the song ends.)

I hope this helps a bit.

Cheers!
dirck
2015 John H. Dick
1994 Larry Breslin ("Deerhead")
1952 Vincente Tatay

2handband
Posts: 948
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2015 7:31 pm

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by 2handband » Sun Feb 19, 2017 4:05 am

You keep using that word... I do not think it means what you think it means.

Seriously, I don't even understand the question. At the end of the day rhythm refers to the duration of notes in relation to one another... it doesn't have any other valid definition.

twistedblues
Posts: 192
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 7:48 pm

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by twistedblues » Fri Mar 03, 2017 9:46 pm

Here is a partial list of Rhythms used in Flamenco music

Image


I'm surprised a list like this apparently doesn't exist for classical music

stevel
Posts: 562
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2011 2:15 pm

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by stevel » Fri Mar 03, 2017 9:49 pm

1. Whole Note.
2. Two Whole Notes.
3. Three Whole Notes.
n. n Whole Notes (though an infinite piece doesn't exist, though a Round could be)

A. Half Note.
B. Two Half Notes.
C. Three Half Notes.
n. n Half Notes.

1A. Whole note followed by Half note.
A1. Half note followed by Whole note.
1B. Whole Note followed by Two Half Notes.
B1. Two Half Notes followed by a Whole note.

Shall I go on, or do you understand why this is a stupid question?

There are no "stock" rhythms in Classical Music. There are a few "patterns" such as "Alberti Bass" or "Broken Octaves" (sometimes called Murky Bass) though these have more to do with Pitch than Rhythm.

There are certain Dance forms, such as a Sarabande, that has an emphasis on Beat 2, so often has a Rhythm like quarter followed by dotted quarter, followed by 8th, but it's really only the emphasis on 2 that's important. Siciliienes often have a dotted 8th followed by a 16th followed by an 8th in 6/8 meter.

But when we encounter either of those rhythms elsewhere, we don't say "it's a Sicelliene" rhythm or a "Sarabande" rhythm.

"Stock" rhythms (and progressions, and patterns) are more the realm of "folk music" and only when folk forms (such as dances) were emulated in Classical music did those things appear.

Let's just say, Classical music is more creative, and doesn't limit itself to so many stylistic rhythmic patterns that enough consistency exists where naming them would be of any value.

Thus, there is no list.

Furthermore, I should note that most good music goes beyond simply using "presets". You can certainly find "claves" in Brazillian inspired music, but there's usually more to it (even in folk/pop music) than that.
Last edited by stevel on Fri Mar 03, 2017 10:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

2handband
Posts: 948
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2015 7:31 pm

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by 2handband » Fri Mar 03, 2017 9:55 pm

:wink:
stevel wrote:AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!

Someone else please say it. It always makes me look like the bad guy.
I already made a bad guy post in this thread... your turn.

twistedblues
Posts: 192
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 7:48 pm

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by twistedblues » Fri Mar 03, 2017 9:59 pm

Now I'm even more confused :(

stevel
Posts: 562
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2011 2:15 pm

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by stevel » Fri Mar 03, 2017 10:15 pm

2handband wrote::wink:
stevel wrote:AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!

Someone else please say it. It always makes me look like the bad guy.
I already made a bad guy post in this thread... your turn.
Darn hoped I could post my better approach before anyone got this one, but alas...

The amended post is immediately above.

twistedblues
Posts: 192
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 7:48 pm

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by twistedblues » Fri Mar 03, 2017 10:16 pm

stevel wrote:1. Whole Note.
2. Two Whole Notes.
3. Three Whole Notes.
n. n Whole Notes (though an infinite piece doesn't exist, though a Round could be)

A. Half Note.
B. Two Half Notes.
C. Three Half Notes.
n. n Half Notes.

1A. Whole note followed by Half note.
A1. Half note followed by Whole note.
1B. Whole Note followed by Two Half Notes.
B1. Two Half Notes followed by a Whole note.

Shall I go on, or do you understand why this is a stupid question?

There are no "stock" rhythms in Classical Music. There are a few "patterns" such as "Alberti Bass" or "Broken Octaves" (sometimes called Murky Bass) though these have more to do with Pitch than Rhythm.

There are certain Dance forms, such as a Sarabande, that has an emphasis on Beat 2, so often has a Rhythm like quarter followed by dotted quarter, followed by 8th, but it's really only the emphasis on 2 that's important. Siciliienes often have a dotted 8th followed by a 16th followed by an 8th in 6/8 meter.

But when we encounter either of those rhythms elsewhere, we don't say "it's a Sicelliene" rhythm or a "Sarabande" rhythm.

"Stock" rhythms (and progressions, and patterns) are more the realm of "folk music" and only when folk forms (such as dances) were emulated in Classical music did those things appear.

Let's just say, Classical music is more creative, and doesn't limit itself to so many stylistic rhythmic patterns that enough consistency exists where naming them would be of any value.

Thus, there is no list.

Furthermore, I should note that most good music goes beyond simply using "presets". You can certainly find "claves" in Brazillian inspired music, but there's usually more to it (even in folk/pop music) than that.
Thank you! This helps. Anyone else have more to add?

stevel
Posts: 562
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2011 2:15 pm

Re: List of Rhythms used in Classical Guitar Music

Post by stevel » Fri Mar 03, 2017 10:26 pm

twistedblues wrote:Now I'm even more confused :(
Read my edited post above if you didn't.

In "Classical" music, rhythm is not "pre-defined".

Simply put, anything is possible.

Now, they didn't use 128th notes or smaller too often, and they didn't use Breves or longer too often, nor did they use the highly syncopated rhythms of Jazz, or incredibly complex polyrhythms of Eliot Carter. Likewise groups of 5, 7, or 11, were not common (at least until Chopin's time).

But with just 16th note, 8th note, 1/4 note, half note, and whole note, plus the ability to tie notes, have dotted notes, basic triplet groups, and then add to that the ability to include rests, the number of combinations of "rhythms" is already so incalculably close to infinite for our purposes that there's no need to bother.

You may be using the word "Rhythm" to describe was is essentially a "Stock Rhythm Pattern", and the word is sometimes (commonly) used that way.

But you're not looking for "Classical Guitar Rhythms".

You're looking for "Stock Rhythmic Patterns used in pieces for Classical Guitar".

These could be something like a "Tango" or "Habenera" which have "stock" accompaniment patterns (which are actually more than just Rhythmic, because many of them have Pitch contour as well as Harmonic intent).

It could also include other "folk" music influences (where stock patterns are more likely to be found) such as Flamenco Music, where one could take a simple chord and "play it in a rhythmic pattern".

Thus, any "list" of "Rhythms" would be a listing of predominantly folk music styles, forms, and patterns that have been used in Classical Guitar Music (and purists might argue that too much of some of those elements takes it out of the realm of "classical" music possibly).

But in Classical *period* music, as well as Baroque, Romantic, and 20the century music where folk forms were not influences or being emulated, there aren't any "stock" rhythmic patterns named. Again, all we have are a handful of "accompaniment techniques" or "stock chord progressions" (Ground Bass, Passacaglia, etc.) but even with them, the amount of variety of "rhythm" within them is pretty much infinite.

Even the ones you encounter fairly regularly don't have names.

Return to “Classical Guitar Classes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot] and 22 guests