new generation of guitarists and their technique

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Lugosi
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new generation of guitarists and their technique

Post by Lugosi » Tue Mar 21, 2017 11:20 pm

Hello,

This is somewhat of a complicated question but one that has bugged me for a while. When looking at the older generation of guitarists (Willlams, Barrueco, Parkening, Pierri etc) one would assume they learned technique through playing Segovia scales/slurs and looking at old methods maybe by Sor, Pujol etc.

My question is what about the new generation of great players? By this I mean the recent GFA winners and the like. I am curious as to what technical practice these younger guitarists use, seeing as there is an abundance of technical manuals out there now (Kitharologus, Pumping Nylon, Shearer, Kappel). I remember Viloteau saying he rarely practiced technical exercises and I wonder if this is more common nowadays. The level of technique is the highest its ever been in the classical guitar world but it seems to be not talked about much in the very few interviews I've seen of younger players.

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souldier
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Re: new generation of guitarists and their technique

Post by souldier » Tue Mar 21, 2017 11:37 pm

It would be quite difficult to answer this question. As you said, there are a tonne of materials out there and it could very well be that each person arrived to their level using a different route probably highly dependent on their guitar instructor. Sometimes different methods work better for different people. The only way we'd really know is if someone gathered their own primary data from a good sample size of classical guitarists to see if there is any common trend among them.
"Success grants its rewards to a few, but is the dream of the multitudes.
Excellence is available to all, but is accepted only by a few." - Christopher Parkening

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JohnyZuper
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Re: new generation of guitarists and their technique

Post by JohnyZuper » Thu Apr 06, 2017 4:55 am

I'm curious about this too. Frankly, compared to some of today's players, I find myself often disliking the music of the supposed masters of the past. Today's players seem more sensitive, focused, lyrical.
―Michaël Samyn.

robert e
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Re: new generation of guitarists and their technique

Post by robert e » Thu Apr 06, 2017 4:34 pm

The fact that Viloteau rarely does technical exercises doesn't mean that he didn't do tons of them when he was learning his technique. In fact, Viloteau is one of many of his generation of virtuosos who have released technique tutorials on youtube, so, clearly, he advocates technical practice at some stage of learning. His guide to arpeggio study, Vardanyan on scale practice, Dylla on Carcassi Study #7, not to mention various master class videos, give us some insight into their respective approaches to studying technique, even if they themselves have left that particular phase of their education behind. Some of them have published their own technique books as well.

As to comparisons with earlier generations, I expect and welcome a more or less steady advancement in the state of the art as a sign that all is well. After all, this generation is standing on the shoulders of the previous, who pioneered much of the pedagogy and promoted both a higher level of performance and of teaching. Thanks to them, guitar is now taught at many conservatories, where guitar students benefit from exposure to aesthetic and performance pedagogies developed and refined for centuries longer. These students, in turn, will refine technical and artistic teaching even further, correcting when necessary, benefitting the next generation.

EDIT: Not to mention the engagement, by that older generation of guitarists, of composers and audiences accustomed to the highest levels of virtuosity, and those expectations then becoming the norm for classical guitar performance as well. It is a complex question, with many facets and interactions, but I think that, overall, it's a synergistic climb to higher levels.
Last edited by robert e on Thu Apr 06, 2017 7:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

celestemcc
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Re: new generation of guitarists and their technique

Post by celestemcc » Thu Apr 06, 2017 5:50 pm

I just saw Thibaud Garcia play (winner of 2016 GFA). His technique is very solid, and it was interesting to note that he plays on the right side of his nails, which I haven't seen much of. Very musical player, with a lovely RH tone.
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robert e
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Re: new generation of guitarists and their technique

Post by robert e » Thu Apr 06, 2017 7:21 pm

celestemcc wrote:I just saw Thibaud Garcia play (winner of 2016 GFA). His technique is very solid, and it was interesting to note that he plays on the right side of his nails, which I haven't seen much of. Very musical player, with a lovely RH tone.
Unusual indeed. I looked up some of his videos and wondered if he's using the Ida Presti right hand technique. There's no mention of her on Garcia's web site, but it turns out that his teacher, Paul Ferret, studied with Alexandre Lagoya, who had adopted some of his wife's (Presti's) RH approach.

On another thread, some of us have noted the prevalence of a more supinated RH posture among recent competition winners--a different way to, in some cases, involve the right side of the nail. It'll be interesting to see if this is a momentary coincidence or more of a trend.

robert e
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Re: new generation of guitarists and their technique

Post by robert e » Thu Apr 06, 2017 7:23 pm

oops. deleted mistake.

celestemcc
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Re: new generation of guitarists and their technique

Post by celestemcc » Thu Apr 06, 2017 7:32 pm

The first thing I noticed (I was sitting quite close) was his right hand looked very much like Segovia's. Can't recall at what point it became clear he was using the right side of the nails, but there was more of a bend to his wrist than was typical of Segovia-technique players, and then it became clear. Sometimes everything old is new again...?
2015 Connor spruce/Indian rosewood
1978 Ramirez 1a cedar

astro64
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Re: new generation of guitarists and their technique

Post by astro64 » Fri Apr 07, 2017 4:13 am

I have seen many young performers in the GFA over the past year in the competition. None played with as extreme a hand position as Garcia. It obviously works for him, he is a very musical player. That hand position would surely not work for me. I doubt anyone could get used to it if starting out later on the guitar.

chien buggle
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Re: new generation of guitarists and their technique

Post by chien buggle » Thu Apr 20, 2017 9:48 pm

Viloteau has written an ebook on technique called inside the black box and it has some very good parts. Another book that deals with similar issues is technique mechanism, learning by eduardo Fernández (its not an easy read but well worth it). I feel like technique books that focus on drills are a bit dated at this stage.

I am very interested in modern style of playing that is epitomised by the French school of players such as Viloteau, Thibaud Garcia, Florin Larousse and many others. A lot can be learnt by watching videos and studying fingerings. Modern players have a very different approach to fingering compared to segovia or bream.

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