Recommendations for Bach

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Phillip_H
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Recommendations for Bach

Postby Phillip_H » Mon Mar 27, 2017 11:02 pm

I'm a long time guitarist, but most of that time has been on electric. I guess I'm at an intermediate level for classical. I have played a lot of Brouwer in addition to the Carcassi/Sor studies.

Anyway, I'm looking for some Bach recommendations that wouldn't be way beyond my level. I have the Koonce edition of the lute suites and I'm thinking about tackling the prelude to BWV 1006a in E major. I worked through about 1.5 pages yesterday and it seems to be somewhat accessible.

Any other recommendations?

CGCristian92
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Re: Recommendations for Bach

Postby CGCristian92 » Tue Mar 28, 2017 4:08 am

I would suggest starting with the 999 prelude. Maybe even the prelude for the 996 suite.

Dirck Nagy
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Re: Recommendations for Bach

Postby Dirck Nagy » Tue Mar 28, 2017 4:47 am

How about the cello suites? Suites 1-3 are not too horribly difficult, especially #1, which is a recognizable favorite.

There have been LOTS of arrangements. Stanley Yates' is pretty good for suite 1. (I admit I like John Duarte's #3, but a lot of people don't...lots of added notes)

If you are playing for your own amusement, I don't think there is anything wrong with playing individual movements from suites, instead of trying to tackle the whole thing.

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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: Recommendations for Bach

Postby Stephen Kenyon » Tue Mar 28, 2017 8:45 am

If you are coping fine with 1006a, you're not intermediate!

A second vote for cello suites, esp if you are interested in learning a whole suite, rather than just odd movements here and there. Another common 'first Bach' is the famous 996 Bourrée.
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Phillip_H
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Re: Recommendations for Bach

Postby Phillip_H » Tue Mar 28, 2017 12:46 pm

Thanks for the recommendations - I'll check out the cello suite arrangements. (I have already played the Bourrée from BWV 996 btw).

I guess I'm looking for a long term project. I'm not a serious performer, so I'm not opposed to cherry picking individual movements rather than taking on an entire suite. The Prelude to 1006a is 6 pages by itself, and I'm kinda crawling through page 1 at something like 48bpm at the moment.

I want to get past the music that worked on in college (that kind of feels like student music) and really dig into some serious literature. I'm not really interested in most of the Spanish nationalist music that Segovia championed. I'd rather play modern or Baroque. I know that eventually I'll need to take on Leyenda or whatever, but not right now.

celestemcc
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Re: Recommendations for Bach

Postby celestemcc » Tue Mar 28, 2017 4:14 pm

Seconding Cello Suite 1, BWV 1007. Koonce's is good, as is the one from the Iceland Guitar School, both of which are relatively spare. (Just Google the term). The latter is free. I pick and choose from both editions because they're voiced slightly differently, the former being a bit more true to the Cello version, but both are acceptable and relatively easy. The gigue's tough no matter which edition, though, at tempo!

The Lute suites are a lot more difficult, very broadly speaking.
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mmapag
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Re: Recommendations for Bach

Postby mmapag » Wed Mar 29, 2017 9:32 pm

celestemcc wrote:Seconding Cello Suite 1, BWV 1007. Koonce's is good, as is the one from the Iceland Guitar School, both of which are relatively spare. (Just Google the term). The latter is free. I pick and choose from both editions because they're voiced slightly differently, the former being a bit more true to the Cello version, but both are acceptable and relatively easy. The gigue's tough no matter which edition, though, at tempo!

The Lute suites are a lot more difficult, very broadly speaking.

What level would you say this piece is Celeste? I like it and will likely learn it. I've recently started working on BWV 1003 Andante with Per Olav Kindren's transcription and it is going OK but it may beyond my current proficiency in some parts. I have a knack for picking pieces that look easy but have sections harder than I currently can play! :shock:
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Erik Zurcher
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Re: Recommendations for Bach

Postby Erik Zurcher » Wed Mar 29, 2017 9:48 pm

I recommend Allen Krantz' edition of the Cello Suites Nos. 1, 2 and 3 for guitar , published by International Music Company, New York, No. 3464.
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Re: Recommendations for Bach

Postby RectifiedGTRz » Wed Mar 29, 2017 10:11 pm

Bach: Prelude to the Prelude, Fugue and Allegro then try the Allegro. The first lute suite is accessible to an intermediate as well, which is what the Bouree comes from you are talking about. I have the Yates Cello suites and the Duarte and the Lorimar versions. Yates isn't as complex as the Duarte; I tried transcribing the first Cello suite in G Major trying to keep the original key, (Low E to D and A to G) but when you get to the pedal points at the end you have to transcribe part of it an octave higher so it really does not work as well as the Duarte version. D major gives a nice sonority to the suite; I just don't care for it in C major.

Take the Allemande, Sarabande, Bouree, and Courante of the Koontz version of the first lute suite. The Gigue is wonderful to play but tough. The prelude and presto is nice but may inhibit you to go further if you are not into it. Then tackle some of the other individual movements. The lute suite in a minor isn't too difficult for the inner dances. Bach is great but does require some stamina and technical chops. Genius music though. Also get an easy version of Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring and then maybe try the Parkening version. Oh and try the Parkening version of the first prelude of the Well Tempered Clavier as it isn't really that demanding! Enjoy!
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celestemcc
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Re: Recommendations for Bach

Postby celestemcc » Thu Mar 30, 2017 12:46 am

What level would you say this piece is Celeste?


Don't know as I can say what level it is: not beginner, perhaps intermediate to advanced intermediate? The Prelude isn't hard, certainly easier than most of Bach's Lute Suites by far. Depends on the edition and your preferences, honestly: I'd look over several to see what you like. Some are more heavily fingered, some less; some more cello-like, some more guitar-like in the use of campanella and added bass notes. The ones I use, Iceland and Koontz, are relatively spare and I find them easy, particularly the Prelude. My teacher insists that it's an accomplishment in itself to learn an entire suite, even an "easy" one (I'd agree!).
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Jim Davidson
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Re: Recommendations for Bach

Postby Jim Davidson » Fri Mar 31, 2017 2:16 am

I'd look at the Violin Sonatas and Partitas. As written for the violin, they're very playable. You can fill it in with some harmony yourself or at least have an idea of what you're looking for when you look at others' arrangements of it. This also lets you tailor the difficulty level yourself. If you learn the 2nd Partita, you could work yourself up to the Chaconne.
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