Can an Old Guy make it to 10,000 Hours? A rhetorical question

A "classroom" environment for exchanging Technical Questions & Answers, How-To's, music theory concepts, etc.
User avatar
Rick Beauregard
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 827
Joined: Thu Nov 06, 2014 5:23 am
Location: Blaine, WA

Re: Can an Old Guy make it to 10,000 Hours? A rhetorical question

Post by Rick Beauregard » Fri May 12, 2017 3:54 pm

Eberhard Mueller wrote:
Fri May 12, 2017 1:11 am
Perhaps it might be useful to conjecture about if, when and where a senior student has an advantage over the young student? I already mentioned one. He can afford a nicer guitar. :D
Great question Eberhard!

I often lamented, in my 40's, that work cut too much into my free time for pursuing my real passions (and I had a pretty stimulating job as an environmental consultant): family, playing CG, sailing, or fly fishing. Obviously we have more time to pursue these things. We also I think have a different perspective of time. If someone HAD told me at age 12 that I just needed to put in the 10 years or whatever (and maybe someone did), I can hear myself saying, "Holy crap, no way! I can learn theee chords and play any tune on the top 40."

We should have lifelong passions that are physically and intellectually stimulating, and expansive and evergreen. Music is perfect. If I can't play I can write. If I can't write I can listen. The 10,000 hour goal is not about achieving someone's opinion about perfection or mastery, it is about pursuing a goal and maintaining the "beginners mind." That keeps us "young."
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

User avatar
rinneby
Posts: 593
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:52 am
Location: Sweden

Re: Can an Old Guy make it to 10,000 Hours? A rhetorical question

Post by rinneby » Sat May 20, 2017 1:11 pm

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Fri May 12, 2017 3:54 pm
Eberhard Mueller wrote:
Fri May 12, 2017 1:11 am
Perhaps it might be useful to conjecture about if, when and where a senior student has an advantage over the young student? I already mentioned one. He can afford a nicer guitar. :D
Great question Eberhard!

I often lamented, in my 40's, that work cut too much into my free time for pursuing my real passions (and I had a pretty stimulating job as an environmental consultant): family, playing CG, sailing, or fly fishing. Obviously we have more time to pursue these things. We also I think have a different perspective of time. If someone HAD told me at age 12 that I just needed to put in the 10 years or whatever (and maybe someone did), I can hear myself saying, "Holy crap, no way! I can learn theee chords and play any tune on the top 40."

We should have lifelong passions that are physically and intellectually stimulating, and expansive and evergreen. Music is perfect. If I can't play I can write. If I can't write I can listen. The 10,000 hour goal is not about achieving someone's opinion about perfection or mastery, it is about pursuing a goal and maintaining the "beginners mind." That keeps us "young."
Well said! :guitare:
1965 - Masaru Kono No.5
1972 - Yamaha GC-3D
1973 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.80
2004 - Lars Jönsson Torres SE 114

You are the instrument, not the guitar

User avatar
Eberhard Mueller
Posts: 79
Joined: Mon Oct 03, 2016 3:58 pm
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Re: Can an Old Guy make it to 10,000 Hours? A rhetorical question

Post by Eberhard Mueller » Mon May 22, 2017 10:25 pm

I came across this clip on another Delcamp thread. I bet that these "beginner," youngsters have already done their time,10,000 hours. As far as this oldster beginner, well, he is eating his heart out. Just kidding, it is a thrill to see these kids play. I just had to insert this into the "Old Guy" 10,000 hour question, thread - for the sake of balance. :twisted:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9AbL1GlCPM
Neil Douglas 2001 (German Spruce / German Maple)
Neil Douglas 1992 (Engelmann Spruce / Brazilian Rosewood)
La Patrie Motif
Cordoba Mini M

User avatar
Rick Beauregard
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 827
Joined: Thu Nov 06, 2014 5:23 am
Location: Blaine, WA

Re: Can an Old Guy make it to 10,000 Hours? A rhetorical question

Post by Rick Beauregard » Wed Jun 07, 2017 2:52 pm

When I hit the wall or reach a plateau, I seek out tips to help me over the hurdles. I find David Motto's tips and book are helpful to keep me on track. This week he talks about daily practice and the challenge of the 10,000 hour hurdle. http://davidmotto.com/practice-today/co ... ment-13280

I find that the idea of having a goal that can, to a degree, compensate for the lack of "the gift" can be encouraging.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: Can an Old Guy make it to 10,000 Hours? A rhetorical question

Post by James A. Showalter » Wed Jun 07, 2017 11:09 pm

" The 10,000 hour goal is not about achieving someone's opinion about perfection or mastery, it is about pursuing a goal and maintaining the "beginners mind." That keeps us "young." "

I remember thinking when I was young about guitar and then again when I was in middle-age. I piddled with it then. Now I'm 60 and rethinking guitar and now I'm 5 years into it. I'll retire next year and have a goal to learn CG. I don't know that I'll get to 10000 hours but I hope so. My thinking is that I will keep at it and am so awed by the volume of lessons in the Delcamp D01-D03. I started with D01 more than a month ago and just now printed it. I'll need to visit Office Depot for paper If I keep that up. I had developed from the past and now over the last 5 years a picking technique which assigned a single finger to each high string with the thumb playing the lowest 3 strings. Right from the start the picking technique for CG is new to me. Learning music, new technique, advancing daily. This is youthful. I'm not keeping track of my hours; yet. I have repaired hands, aching joints, and a mind that thinks. My perspective is that us older students can experience the joy of the "beginners mind" and Delcamp is a gift to all of us regardless of age or prior experience.

User avatar
Rick Beauregard
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 827
Joined: Thu Nov 06, 2014 5:23 am
Location: Blaine, WA

Re: Can an Old Guy make it to 10,000 Hours? A rhetorical question

Post by Rick Beauregard » Thu Jun 08, 2017 1:28 am

James A. Showalter wrote:
Wed Jun 07, 2017 11:09 pm
" The 10,000 hour goal is not about achieving someone's opinion about perfection or mastery, it is about pursuing a goal and maintaining the "beginners mind." That keeps us "young." "

I remember thinking when I was young about guitar and then again when I was in middle-age. I piddled with it then. Now I'm 60 and rethinking guitar and now I'm 5 years into it. I'll retire next year and have a goal to learn CG. I don't know that I'll get to 10000 hours but I hope so. My thinking is that I will keep at it and am so awed by the volume of lessons in the Delcamp D01-D03. I started with D01 more than a month ago and just now printed it. I'll need to visit Office Depot for paper If I keep that up. I had developed from the past and now over the last 5 years a picking technique which assigned a single finger to each high string with the thumb playing the lowest 3 strings. Right from the start the picking technique for CG is new to me. Learning music, new technique, advancing daily. This is youthful. I'm not keeping track of my hours; yet. I have repaired hands, aching joints, and a mind that thinks. My perspective is that us older students can experience the joy of the "beginners mind" and Delcamp is a gift to all of us regardless of age or prior experience.
Welcome to the lessons, James! I've been following them for three years, starting at D03 where my level was at when I started. I just graduated from D05. Here is my final exam piece.

Youtube


Regarding printing the scores, you can save trees by just printing the lessons and pieces assigned each month and s as you go. Are you submitting your videos? I highly recommend this practice as it gives you a bit of performance practice as well. If you are, I'll pop into the D03 lessons to have a listen. Good luck with it and have fun!
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: Can an Old Guy make it to 10,000 Hours? A rhetorical question

Post by James A. Showalter » Thu Jun 15, 2017 8:22 pm

Thank you Rick.

That's a nice melody. It inspires me.

I haven't yet gotten far enough along with the lessons to try videos. My history in guitar has strictly been playing TAB and trying to learn as much as I can from on-line lessons about how music theory works with guitar. Sight reading music is a challenge for me right now. I plan on joining the classes formally in September when the new term starts.

Again, thanks for the Welcome.

I have no fly rods but still more fishing poles than guitars. I'm working on it though.

User avatar
Eberhard Mueller
Posts: 79
Joined: Mon Oct 03, 2016 3:58 pm
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Re: Can an Old Guy make it to 10,000 Hours? A rhetorical question

Post by Eberhard Mueller » Sat Jun 17, 2017 8:11 pm

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Thu Jun 08, 2017 1:28 am
Welcome to the lessons, James! I've been following them for three years, starting at D03 where my level was at when I started. I just graduated from D05. Here is my final exam piece.

Youtube
Congratulations, Rick! Well done!
Neil Douglas 2001 (German Spruce / German Maple)
Neil Douglas 1992 (Engelmann Spruce / Brazilian Rosewood)
La Patrie Motif
Cordoba Mini M

Return to “Classical Guitar Classes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot], lazyrighthand and 15 guests